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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Cheryl Wornham Profile

    Are there any side effects with radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Cheryl, I haven't experienced radiation yet but that's part of my treatment plan. I had chemo first, now I'm preparing for my mastectomy, with 6 1/2 weeks of radiation following after I heal from surgery. I have spoken to several people that have been through it and read a great deal. Most of...

      more

      Hi Cheryl, I haven't experienced radiation yet but that's part of my treatment plan. I had chemo first, now I'm preparing for my mastectomy, with 6 1/2 weeks of radiation following after I heal from surgery. I have spoken to several people that have been through it and read a great deal. Most of what I've learned about the common side effects are fatigue, some skin irritation and redness (similar to a sunburn), and perhaps some tenderness. The side effects are supposed to be a lot milder compared to chemo. :)

      3 comments
    • MARTY THOMAS Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Cheryl. Every person is different. I had chemotherapy, followed by seven weeks of radiation, followed by one year of Herceptin infusion. Unfortunately, I did burn toward the end of the therapy. The doctor cut short my therapy by a few days and gave me some cream. It wasn't very pleasant...

      more

      Hi Cheryl. Every person is different. I had chemotherapy, followed by seven weeks of radiation, followed by one year of Herceptin infusion. Unfortunately, I did burn toward the end of the therapy. The doctor cut short my therapy by a few days and gave me some cream. It wasn't very pleasant but the pain goes away and so does the cancer! Good luck.

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Should / can I work during radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I was diagnosed with Stage 1A in October. I had surgical biopsy/lumpectomy. Then 30 radiation treatments which ended just before Christmas. Throughout radiation I managed to babysit my two year old grandson two days a week, 10 hours each day. Friends watched him for me when I went for treatment...

      more

      I was diagnosed with Stage 1A in October. I had surgical biopsy/lumpectomy. Then 30 radiation treatments which ended just before Christmas. Throughout radiation I managed to babysit my two year old grandson two days a week, 10 hours each day. Friends watched him for me when I went for treatment those two days. The most tiring thing was getting back and forth to the hospital five days a week for six weeks.

      Comment
    • P C Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      I took time off because I had to go twice a day.

      3 comments
  • Mary G Profile

    Completed my last chemo today! Wanted to stop by and say thanks to all who helped me get through this part of the journey with your positive comments and tips. On to the next steps; mastectomy and rads.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    almost 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Mary,

      HOO-RAH!!! This was a big one, thank goodness!! So happy for you, take a big deep breath. Chemo ain't for wimps!

      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Oh you are going to feel so much better now that chemo is done. Its almost over, congratulations

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    hi girls, im on tomoxifen 6mths now, im amgry and i dont laugh anymore, can something help?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I suggest reconnecting with life and reenganging it. You are coming out of a huge ordeal. Even if it was supported. I've been on it not quite as long as you but I'm still getting chemo. The tomoxiphen is a daily reminder. Try to insert happiness until more of those thoughts come naturally. ...

      more

      I suggest reconnecting with life and reenganging it. You are coming out of a huge ordeal. Even if it was supported. I've been on it not quite as long as you but I'm still getting chemo. The tomoxiphen is a daily reminder. Try to insert happiness until more of those thoughts come naturally.

      I go to a yoga class. There she guides us to focus on a neutral thought. Then add to it another and another. Move from neutral thoughts to happy thoughts. She says you can change your mood in seven minutes.

      Do something you love and do it often. Walk. Pick a flower. Bake. Meet friends. Volunteer. Work. Craft. I don't have the answers but being distracted can be a relief even if it isn't permanent. It is natural and you are not putting more in your body.

      Best in finding something other than appointments and cancer to think about.
      The

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Effexor works really well for a lot of people.

      Comment

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