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Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My recently diagnosed 40yr old sister-in-law doesn't want my help. We live 30 miles away and only see her a few times a year. Her church and neighbors are supportive. Any suggestions on how to be there for her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people...

      more

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people comforted me in many ways. My sisters who lived out of town, checked in with me weekly by phone or email, they sent care packages during the weeks I had chemotherapy with books, warm fuzzy socks, and sometimes sent flowers. My friends were determined to cook for me, but I was dreading being bombarded with visitors when I felt miserable. So I placed a cooler outside my door and they all took turns delivering food for my family when I could not function. One place I looked forward to having visitors was the chemotherapy room because I needed to sit there for a few hours and I was usually feeling quite well on those days. Some friends and family also drove me to radiation as it was an hours drive away. And then there were cards and notes in the mail that to this day I still read as I look back on how people helped me when I never wanted help, but that is what got me through the most difficult time in my life. I am thankful that so many people found a way to care. My thoughts are with you and your sister- in-law and I know you will find your own way to help her. Take care!

      Comment
    • Jennifer Jackson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with all of the above. Never underestimate the power of prayer. I recently experienced a very bad cancer scare, and felt comforted through the prayers of others.

      Comment
  • Connie Hass Profile

    I feel like my old self before breast cancer will never return. I want my energy & happiness back. I'm 2 months out of radiation and I'm still flipping tired after a half day! Is this normal & for how long?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I totally understand how you feel Connie!!! I'm 2 months out of radiation as well and still feeling exhausted. I started back to work on June 4th & I

      5 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      You will return to your old self. You have been through a big assault on your immune system and it takes a while to get back to how you felt before. I sure agree with Lysa too. Be patient, be good to yourself, we all recover at different rates. At two months (just 8 weeks) you are just...

      more

      You will return to your old self. You have been through a big assault on your immune system and it takes a while to get back to how you felt before. I sure agree with Lysa too. Be patient, be good to yourself, we all recover at different rates. At two months (just 8 weeks) you are just beginning your recovery. Listen to your body if it is saying to you...."I'm tired!" You will get back to your normal self. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      3 comments
  • Jessica Mcconnaughy Profile

    Both my aunts had breast cancer - what're my chances of getting breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Tasha Wainstein Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You should consider genetic counselling to get an accurate assessment of your risks of developing breast cancer especially if your family members were diagnosed with breast cancer at younger ages (less than 50 years).

      Comment
    • Jessica Mcconnaughy Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Ok thank you

      Comment
  • renee  lorenz Profile

    My mother recently had breast cancer, am I at risk also?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Ryan Nez Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Probably not it doesn't hurt to get checked. My mon is suffering from a rare form of breast cancer called HR2

      6 comments
    • Diane Lewey Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Has your mother been tested BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutation? The BRAC 1

      Comment

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