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Jan's Story

About her story

"I am one woman among hundreds of thousands of women who are learning to be courageous, and to overcome, and to live in the face of cancer."

Jan was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer in June 2009 after undergoing a routine bone scan for an unrelated injury. A wife and mother, Jan described her initial diagnosis as a complete shock.

"I remember just the sensation of having the wind sucked out of my lungs, a sucker punch, or something that stops you mid-stride," says Jan about her diagnosis. "And then as you begin to breathe again, there's this one million questions that circle your mind. "

Realizing that her family needed her and that she had some things she still wanted to accomplish, Jan decided to fight. Her touching story of survival and hope is an inspiration to anyone facing the difficult journey of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My mother is 69 yrs old. just diagnosed with L breast cancer, pending biopsy. She is resident of USAbut not citizen, DOESN'T HAVE ANY INSURANCE, how can I get her treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I would contact the American Cancer Society, Planned Parenthood, and Susan G. Komen Foundation. They would be sources of information for your Mom's treatment.

      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Vicki Geer Fournier Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I would also contact the state you live in to see if they have sort of plan for women with breast cancer. I live in New Hampshire & New Hampshire & Maine have a "no women be left behind" progam (Breast & Cervical Cancer program). I am on that & once I was diagnosed I automatically was approved...

      more

      I would also contact the state you live in to see if they have sort of plan for women with breast cancer. I live in New Hampshire & New Hampshire & Maine have a "no women be left behind" progam (Breast & Cervical Cancer program). I am on that & once I was diagnosed I automatically was approved for Medicaid (but only for the breast cancer) What a relief it was not to have to worry about the bills. GOOD LUCK!

      Comment
  • Lynn Rambo Profile

    How long after the itchiness starts will I begin to lose my hair???

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Wanda S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      My hair started to fall out 14-16 days after my first chemo. I buzzed it a few days later.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      My scalp hurt and tingled about 14 days after my first chemo appointment. As Betti says, everybody is different. My hair then started to come out in clumps. It was lousy to have that happen but it grows back. Hang in there, and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Once removed does a lymph node grow back?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      I don't believe they grow back, but often the lymph finds other paths to move through the body. It's pretty impossible for surgeons to remove every lymph node in an area so you usually have some left to do the work. I got this info from my lymphedema PT.

      2 comments
    • Mimi Carroll Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Nope, they don't grow back. We do have others . I had 13 out in February and I am doing fine. I get massages and do exercises to help the fluid go to other nodes. Two best lymph exercises- jump on trampoline or rebounder and when sitting flex your foot up and down.
      I wear a compression...

      more

      Nope, they don't grow back. We do have others . I had 13 out in February and I am doing fine. I get massages and do exercises to help the fluid go to other nodes. Two best lymph exercises- jump on trampoline or rebounder and when sitting flex your foot up and down.
      I wear a compression sleeve my dic gave when doing lifting and will for flying.

      3 comments
  • Peter P Profile

    do you believe there should male breast cancer awareness and education programs made available for men and their partners?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help...

      more

      Yes, definitely do! I don't think enough men are aware that they can get breast cancer. And I have read about doctors dismissing their male patients or misdiagnosing them... and then what occurs, is the cancer is found in a late stage. This time of year is the perfect time for people to help bring more awareness by writing an article for your local newspaper, congressman, etc.

      Comment
    • Peter P Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or...

      more

      Thanks Diana. I live in Canada. I found a small lump in my left breast the the week of June. I was operated on September 1, complete mastectomy and Sentinel lymph node. I was advised yesterday that I have to back in 2 weeks for another surgery to remove more lymph nodes. Then chemo and/ or radiation. Very discouraging but i am glad I'm alive.

      3 comments

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