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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I just had a diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound. My doctor said he is over 95% certain I have cancer. Is it normal to be able to tell just from mammogram and ultrasound? Does that mean I have a large tumor?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Drs. trained in reading studies can usually tell by the films they look at but the only way to see what it truly is is to do a biopsy.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I, too, was told "Expect the biopsy to come back as breast cancer." Many times, the shape and density, of the suspicious area is telling. My tumor was a very weird shape, it was very hard, and felt lumpy. It was not at all like other lumps I had felt in my breasts. I knew, the second I found...

      more

      I, too, was told "Expect the biopsy to come back as breast cancer." Many times, the shape and density, of the suspicious area is telling. My tumor was a very weird shape, it was very hard, and felt lumpy. It was not at all like other lumps I had felt in my breasts. I knew, the second I found it, it was bad. Doctors who look at hundreds and hundreds of lumps each and every day can tell a lump that is classic for breast cancer. There are also time when they can be wrong and that is why a biopsy is needed to confirm their suspicions. There are so many treatments for breast cancers, it is not the death sentence it once was. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My 2nd surgery will be mastectomy (due to too much DCIS) No lymph node issues! Researching reconstruction-expander in R. breast, saline implants in both. Pain? Recovery? Advice? Will do chemo after surgery then implants. The journey continues.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 7 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Jamie Moore-Holmes Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had tissue sparing bilateral mastectomy Sept. 2011, 5 rounds of chemo, April 2012 I had my reconstruction with memory gel implants. For me the bilateral was very painful, however....pain meds were used more freely. Reconstruction was very painful and pain meds were not sufficient. I am heading...

      more

      I had tissue sparing bilateral mastectomy Sept. 2011, 5 rounds of chemo, April 2012 I had my reconstruction with memory gel implants. For me the bilateral was very painful, however....pain meds were used more freely. Reconstruction was very painful and pain meds were not sufficient. I am heading back into surgery in 2 weeks to have the right implant/breast worked on due to scar tissue. Nipple construction the end of Feb. one day at a time. I feel more like "Me" everyday. Jamie

      Comment
    • Paula Svincek Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I aslo had a double mastectomy with reconstruction. I concur with Jo Steinberg. Because a lot of the nerves are affected, it's not extremely painful (drugs certainly helped). Let the anesthesiolist know before surgery that you want something so you won't throw up. I had expanders at the time...

      more

      I aslo had a double mastectomy with reconstruction. I concur with Jo Steinberg. Because a lot of the nerves are affected, it's not extremely painful (drugs certainly helped). Let the anesthesiolist know before surgery that you want something so you won't throw up. I had expanders at the time of surgery, they were put under the muscle. I opted for silicone implants because I thought they looked more natural. Fortunately I didn not have to have radiation.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hey, I was looking for a support group in the New York or Brooklyn area. Anyone?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 4 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Facebook group called "Pink Sisters". Ask the American Cancer Society or Susan B. Komen group. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      stage_3a Patient

      Mount Sinai Dubin Breast Center has a group that meets Wednesday evenings, I believe, near 98th street. They also have other support groups.

      Also check out Gilda's Club in NYC, they are an excellent resource with tons of support groups.

      Good Luck!

      Comment
  • Elizabeth Castro Profile

    How long before the swelling & bruising go away from reconstructive surgery?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My entire back down to my coccyx was bruised from my bilateral recon

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My entire back down to my coccyx was bruised from my bilateral mastectomies with reconstruction. The bruising didn't surface until several days after my surgery It took a couple of weeks for the bruising to fade. I had lost a lot of blood during my surgery the bruising was more from the...

      more

      My entire back down to my coccyx was bruised from my bilateral mastectomies with reconstruction. The bruising didn't surface until several days after my surgery It took a couple of weeks for the bruising to fade. I had lost a lot of blood during my surgery the bruising was more from the pocketing of the blood. I did not have any bruising along the incisional area.

      Comment

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