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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Tom Schink Profile

    My mom just got diagnosed with breast cancer (early Stage 2) and is extremely worried that she will lose her job. First, what's the likelihood of that and second, how can I try to calm this fear?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has...

      more

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has to take off work for treatment. She should also inquire about any disability benefits her employer might offer. Best wishes to you and your Mom

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably ...

      more

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably deeper fears under this one about work. Not that you need to pry them outta her, but remind her she needs to take care of herself, that you're there to listen, and that you'll take her to anyone else she wants to talk to, including a support group.
      Best wishes.

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Any ideas on how to tell my 10 year old daughter I have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have a 10 year old and year old. I just told both kids one month ago. I told them when I knew I would not be hysterical about it. It is all in your delivery. My kids have been fine.

      Comment
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also...

      more

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also be helpful to come up with an outline of topics that you want to cover, because your talk with your daughter will likely become emotional and you may forget what you wanted to say.

      Here is a link to a short article in Parents that may be helpful: http://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/6-ways-to-tell-your-kids-about-breast-cancer/

      Also, remember that you are not alone. Not too long ago, on this site, someone else asked the question "How do I tell my kids". Click on this question and you can see some suggestions from women who have also had to do this: http://beyondtheshock.com/questions/561

      I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but am wishing you the best. Stay strong and keep hope!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    A big shout out to all the sisters and their loved ones along the east coast. Louisiana is praying for you. Hope you see a few of our crews up there lending a hand in pulling you back to some kind of normal. :-D Jo

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      PS! Praying your treatments aren't interrupted and that you all get TLC. Jo

      Comment
    • Kathy Basham Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Jo, you are an inspiration and a help! To all those who have lost so much, love and prayers for restoration coming your way.

      Comment
  • Becky N Profile

    How can I get invited to the private FB group called Pink Sisters?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Just click on my name and add me I use my Facebook to log in I will add you it the simplest way that I know

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Rebecca- friend me on fb Maura Manfredi Philipps and I'll add you

      3 comments

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