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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My first treatment was Wednesday and so far so good. (no sickness or anything) Thank you god. I'm praying the next treatments go good too. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy...

      more

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy and tired and queasy but not enough to make me sick or keep me from doing what I usually do. Hope you're still feeling well!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope...

      more

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope you will share the positive stories of chemotherapy with anyone who is having that type of treatment. You just don't know how anyone is going to react to that stuff. Continued good luck to you. God's blessings..... Sharon

      1 comment
  • Angela Kroninger Profile

    My aunt recently got diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. What does this entail and how can I help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Nancy Collins Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2002

      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or...

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      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or bandanas. I hated a wig, but I was going through chemo and radiation during the hottest part of the summer, so I wore bandanas. Just be there for her, tell her if she needs anything to let you know. We need to be as independent as we can, so someone hovering over us (me and the people I've met along the way have felt this way) isn't good. If she wants to talk, listen, but let her bring up the topic of cancer. Try to treat her like you would before her diagnosis, which I know is hard. You feel so helpless, but you just being there for her, is the great gift you can give her. She'll go through a lot of emotions, which she may or may not show around you, but PLEASE never take it personal if she gets snappy. Not only are we scared, but our bodies are going through some major changes. She's lucky to have you!!!

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special...

      more

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special yogurt that had extra "healthy bacteria", because I had thrush from the chemo. Another friend who was too far away to visit, sent me a little figurine of one woman with her arm around another. Another friend from my church sent me a greeting card every week to cheer me. My pals from work brought me a gift basket with cozy pajamas, a fluffy throw, and some bath stuff. These are the things that mattered most to me when I was "going through the fire".

      You could make up some meals and freeze them for her. I could only eat soft food for a while so noodle casseroles or soups might be good. If she needs help with housework you could organize a cleaning bee. Most of all, just be there for her without smothering.

      Comment
  • D D Profile

    What can I expect from a surgery biopsy and how soon are the results shared? A lump on breast is about 3.5 cm was aspirated and resulted in a bloody liquid and revealed another behind it. (3cm with hardened walls and atypical cells...I'm scared)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi DD, yes it's very scary waiting. It usually takes at least two days (sometimes longer) to get the biopsy results in. While you're waiting ...know that 80% of biopsies are negative. I pray you're in that 80%. Hugs

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was scared too so I know how you feel. Try not to worry until you know for sure what is going on. Remember God loves you and will help you through if you just ask.

      Comment
  • vicky kayley Profile

    Last chemo today yipee can not believe how quickly it has gone, start rads on 4th September. The light is getting near x x

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 20 answers
    • View all 20 answers
    • vicky kayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thank you all for the lovely comments, I really can not believe how quickly it has gone. Good luck to all still in chemo it will be done before you know it , lots of hugs to all x x

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      YIPPEE!!!! What a great place to be. You made it through the chemo and now on to another step.... closer and closer to the end of your treatment. We are all celebrating with you! Pony-Fur Hugs to you! Sharon

      Comment

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