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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Martha  Phillips Profile

    Has anyone lived for ten years with stage 4 breast cancer that went to your bones?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have someone in my support group that is a recurrence stage 4 with metastasis and she's totally ok and under control.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Do I need to be worried about germs as much on radiation as someone on chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Jessica Murphy Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Not so much about germs, but definitely pay attention to the health of your skin and your exposure to the sun. Lindi Skin is a great line that can offer the much needed hydration and also some cooling relief. Invest in a good quality sunscreen, too.

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My rads onc took blood every two weeks to watch my blood count. Unless they say something I think you are OK. Skin is the big deal with rads and fatigue.

      Comment
  • gina richardson Profile

    Tomorrow is the big day that I start chemo. My nerves ate starting to get the best of me. Any last minute tips for a first timer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 16 answers
    • View all 16 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Gina,

      You WILL BE OK! You are nervous because you have no idea what's up with the appointment. My sessions were always about two hours. The port makes it much easier. I did not have any numbing cream but I don't remember it ever being painful. They run saline to clear your line, and a bit of...

      more

      Gina,

      You WILL BE OK! You are nervous because you have no idea what's up with the appointment. My sessions were always about two hours. The port makes it much easier. I did not have any numbing cream but I don't remember it ever being painful. They run saline to clear your line, and a bit of Heperan (sp) to keep it from clotting. I got a metalic taste but that went away. They bring in your "Recipe" in bags, hang them on a "tree" and start running it. At some point, they bring in a HUGE syringe of "red stuff" and inject it into your line. You feel nothing. I always asked them questions, not out of fear but genuine interest. Bring your electronic gadgets with you, your phone, a great book, snacks, water, etc. I would fall asleep because they gave me some kind of additive that made me sleepy. (they probably just wanted to shut me up for a while) Honestly, I looked forward to my appointments because each one meant I was another step closer to being done. I made friends of the staff, looked foward to seeing them and talking. The same with the patients. I never found it to be a bad experience. I would much rather have been playing with my horses but try to "make lemonade" out of your chemo appointments! Hang in there Gina, you will be ok. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Karen G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had my first one a week ago Thursday. I was also really nervous but at the end of the day I had to say it wasn't so bad. If you have a port it also makes it easier just make sure to use the Emla cream to numb it. They have me a Saline Drip first. Than I got my premeds a Steroid, Emend (for...

      more

      I had my first one a week ago Thursday. I was also really nervous but at the end of the day I had to say it wasn't so bad. If you have a port it also makes it easier just make sure to use the Emla cream to numb it. They have me a Saline Drip first. Than I got my premeds a Steroid, Emend (for Nausea) and Pepcid to coat your Stomach before the Chemo drugs go in. I am on the AC T regimen so the nurse pushed the Adriamycin in while I sucked on an ice pop to prevent mouth sores. After that they gave me the Cytoxin through the IV bag. You don't feel any of this going in. I was there for 5 hours but it usually is supposed to take 3-4. Bring some snacks and a light lunch with you and a water bottle (drink a lot to flush out the drugs). I brought a book with me but was too nervous to read. My husband came with me too only because it was my first time and I was scared. Before you know it it is over. Hope this helps.

      1 comment
  • Sarah Hailes Profile

    I have burning pain on the side I had my lymphectomy. I am several months post op and three weeks post chemo. Is this normal? I just assumed it was and never asked. Now I'm wondering if I'm wrong.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sarah,
      I agree with Norma, call your doctor to check this out.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Scar tissue can be tight and burn. Nerves heal and find new paths. It is imperative to stretch and keep the muscles supple. I skipped a month and am having to stretch out again. If you're worried call the doctor.

      Comment

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