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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • tamara carr Profile

    If DCIS isn't cancer, then why would you go through serious life changing surgery?! My doctor believes that because I am only 31 that I should consider a bilateral mastectomy.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I was first diagnosed with DCIS in 2003 I agree that some do not consider it a cancer my doctor was floored by the medical journals that give this sense that DCIS is nothing. If left untreated it does turn into an invasive cancer mastectomy is the treatment of choice and even with a mastectomy...

      more

      I was first diagnosed with DCIS in 2003 I agree that some do not consider it a cancer my doctor was floored by the medical journals that give this sense that DCIS is nothing. If left untreated it does turn into an invasive cancer mastectomy is the treatment of choice and even with a mastectomy you have a 5% chance of reoccurrence i am one of those 5%. My reoccurrence was again caught early at the incisional line with micro invasive cells so further scraping and deeper mastectomy was done. I did not see an oncologist with my first diagnosis I was referred to a breast specialist. Who felt the surgery was enough. I did not want to take tamoxifen at that time I felt there was a greater risk of endometrial cancer and other side effects since I was only 43. They also we're unable to do hormone testing as the tissue that was removed was too small

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      With my reoccurrence in 2008 micro -invasive cells and estrogen so I did take tamoxifen for three years and am now menopausal so was switched to arimidex which I will take for another 5 years Most important message I would like to stress is even with bilateral...

      more

      With my reoccurrence in 2008 micro -invasive cells and estrogen so I did take tamoxifen for three years and am now menopausal so was switched to arimidex which I will take for another 5 years Most important message I would like to stress is even with bilateral mastectomies and reconstruction you need to continue to have those mammograms, ultrasounds, scans or MRI . I was fortunate to be followed with mammograms every 3 months for a year then every 6 months for several years that is how my reoccurrence was again caught at an early stage I graduated to yearly mammograms only 2 years ago. A little discomfort is a small price to pay for early detection.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Why have a double masectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      That's such a tough decision, and a very personal one. For me, I chose to have a double mastectomy for several reasons. My "good" breast had several micro calcifications as well as other small cysts. My stage of cancer didn't allow me to have immediate reconstruction. But after I go through...

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      That's such a tough decision, and a very personal one. For me, I chose to have a double mastectomy for several reasons. My "good" breast had several micro calcifications as well as other small cysts. My stage of cancer didn't allow me to have immediate reconstruction. But after I go through radiation & given the "thumbs up" I will have reconstructive surgery. If I had kept my left breast....it would have to been operated on to match my reconstructed breast. So symmetry was another reason. Although I chose to have both breasts removed there are no guarantees my cancer won't return in the future. It could  even come back somewhere else in my body. That's a reality. But I choose to remain optimistic in my recovery & knowing I have done everything in my power to keep a reoccurrence from happening. Good luck and God bless you in whatever you choose.

      Comment
  • NancyStradley- Pezzi Profile

    Looking for someone who has had stage 2 Infiltrating lobular carcinoma

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years Answer
  • Sarah Hailes Profile

    I'm status post bilateral mastectomies and in the process of chemotherapy. My cancer is stage two and had 10 lymph nodes removed. I have lymph edema. My question is that I really want to run in the future. Is that ever going to be possible???

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • celien thorne Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      After I recovered from mastectomy And a miscarriage i walked -jogged- 3 miles every day. Then I was able to run 3-5 miles for the countdown to my chemo even that very morning before I received chemo I ran , my mantra was "screw u cancer , not gonna stop me".... Now im almost 6 weeks out of...

      more

      After I recovered from mastectomy And a miscarriage i walked -jogged- 3 miles every day. Then I was able to run 3-5 miles for the countdown to my chemo even that very morning before I received chemo I ran , my mantra was "screw u cancer , not gonna stop me".... Now im almost 6 weeks out of chemo but still getting Herceptin I'm back to running 3 miles everymorning "slow but steady " .. And i do strength training exercises , eventually I hope to train for a triathlon I'm no athlete by any means im just not gonna b taken down by this crap not gonna stop me ! You will get your running stride again , one step , one boob , at a time ;-)

      3 comments
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yes! You can do anything you work hard enough to do. We have cancer it doesn't have us. We have to be smart but we can do and be what want.

      1 comment

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