loading... close

Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Cecilia Clark Profile

    The drain's still in place after three weeks. Does anyone else have this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    almost 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No Cecilia, I had mine out at 2 weeks - I then had fluid build up on left side that had to be aspirated. It's better to have them in longer if needed. After reading your bio, I am wondering if you had implants inserted at time of mastectomy & not expanders? You said you had to have the one side...

      more

      No Cecilia, I had mine out at 2 weeks - I then had fluid build up on left side that had to be aspirated. It's better to have them in longer if needed. After reading your bio, I am wondering if you had implants inserted at time of mastectomy & not expanders? You said you had to have the one side revised so that makes me think that. Prayers to you.

      2 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Cecilia,
      I think the drains need to stay in as long as they are needed. They are a pain to have but they are serving a purpose... to drain excess fluids that remain. It is truly better to have them in than have fluids build up. I would just be patient but also keep asking your surgeon about...

      more

      Cecilia,
      I think the drains need to stay in as long as they are needed. They are a pain to have but they are serving a purpose... to drain excess fluids that remain. It is truly better to have them in than have fluids build up. I would just be patient but also keep asking your surgeon about them too. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Lois Croley Profile

    After radiation, when should I start taking tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      The day after I stopped radiation I began taking Tamoxifen. I believe this is common but your oncologist will surely be the one to advise you on this.

      Comment
  • holly jones Profile

    Anyone ever have lightheadedness/dizziness after chemotherapy? I'm 3 mos past my last chemo still on herceptin. Doc thinks it may be my adrenal gland "asleep"..having MRI on my head Tuesday.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Holly, I think anytime you have a question regarding anything to do with your treatments, do not be afraid to contact your doctor to ask. There a many different side effects to the drugs we are given and it is perfectly ok to ask either your pharmicist or doctor. Like I have said before,...

      more

      Holly, I think anytime you have a question regarding anything to do with your treatments, do not be afraid to contact your doctor to ask. There a many different side effects to the drugs we are given and it is perfectly ok to ask either your pharmicist or doctor. Like I have said before, pharmacists are underutilized and are a wealth of knowledge regarding drugs we have to take.

      Comment
    • holly jones Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thank you Sharon for replying. Also wondered if anyone else had ever been told their adrenal glands sometimes temporarily shut down due to being on steroids?

      Comment
  • teresa clark Profile

    Fatigue but no nausea/vomiting for my first chemo treatment!! Can I expect the experience to stay that way?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The steroids kept me feeling pretty good for the first 2-3 days after treatment and then I'd start to feel cruddy. I never actually vomited (well, ok, I did twice, but it was random and I wasn't even feeling that bad at the time!). Mostly I just felt like a constant nagging queasiness, never...

      more

      The steroids kept me feeling pretty good for the first 2-3 days after treatment and then I'd start to feel cruddy. I never actually vomited (well, ok, I did twice, but it was random and I wasn't even feeling that bad at the time!). Mostly I just felt like a constant nagging queasiness, never really like a full-on nausea, if you know what I mean. Good luck!! And keep up the positive attitude!!! I swear, it makes a world of difference to just convince yourself that you feel ok (even when you really don't ;)

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Teresa,
      It is difficult to predict how anyone will feel. I felt as you do, fatigue and no nausea. If you go back to work, be SURE to be aware your immune system is compromised. I don't know how much exposure you have with the public but become a bit of a "germaphobic" while you are going...

      more

      Teresa,
      It is difficult to predict how anyone will feel. I felt as you do, fatigue and no nausea. If you go back to work, be SURE to be aware your immune system is compromised. I don't know how much exposure you have with the public but become a bit of a "germaphobic" while you are going through treatment. Wash your hands often, and don't be touching your eyes, nose, mouth, face. This is a serious flu that is going around. You do not need to pick it up! Take care, Sharon

      1 comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word