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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • NancyStradley- Pezzi Profile

    Looking for someone who has had stage 2 Infiltrating lobular carcinoma

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years Answer
  • Diane Sakowski Profile

    5.6 cm. stage? Surgery in days. Scared

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women...

      more

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women having surgery, going through their treatments and coming out as a victorious survivor! You WILL make it through this journey and be a survivor just like we are. I can assure you, there are good endings to breast cancer. I am a 5 year survivor and just had another GOOD check-up this past Wednesday. I wish we could all get together and give you a little sack of our collective courage. For me, just as Rita said, the surgery.... in my case a mastectomy.... was NOT that bad! The chemo. again, was not that bad. As my oncologist told me...."This is NOT your mother or grandmother's chemotherapy." You stop people from telling you negative stories.... don't listen to them.
      Please remember, we are all here to help support everyone going through this journey. Positive thoughts only.... put on your pink warrior outfit.... and march with determination. Do not be afraid to ask questions of your team, they are there to help you. You WILL triumph as so many women have before you. God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My tumor was 7.3 cm I am stage 3. Last year I had surgery, chemo, and radiation. Today the cancer is gone. I jave to be villigent about my check up but today No ca

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I am a one year survivor this month. I started out stage 1 and ended up stage4 because a "tiny" spot was found on my sternum, which is now gone due to radiation. What I don't completely understand is why didn't I have chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 9 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      That is a good question for your treating physician. Every situation is different, and therefore should be treated differently. I went to a conference earlier this year and the doctor on the panel suggested that it is almost impossible to even measure treatment data in regards to cancer. He...

      more

      That is a good question for your treating physician. Every situation is different, and therefore should be treated differently. I went to a conference earlier this year and the doctor on the panel suggested that it is almost impossible to even measure treatment data in regards to cancer. He said we should record data in narrative form when talking about cancer, instead of numbers and facts. This is because cancer is a disease of abnormality in an individual. That abnormality can manifest itself in a number of different ways, and therefore, it requires a unique and individual approach to its treatment. I know this is a long answer, but I hope it helps you open up a dialogue with you and your doctor. They can probably better explain why your treatment journey was different and address your concerns about chemo. I really hope this helps!

      1 comment
  • Sara Palmer Profile

    My sister was diagnosed with Stage 2 triple negative breast cancer. We live in different states at the moment, but what can I do to help and support her through her treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would recommend sending lots of cards.
      A friend of mine gave me a small gift after every procedure. This was something nice to look forward to each time. Call her often, listen to her fears and worries. It is a rough road but she will remember the sweet touches.

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. ...

      more

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. also, little gifts help--like send her something each week or every 2 weeks or something. Comedy books (Tina fey's bossypants was funny, also the S*%! My dad says helped me when I couldn't sleep. Assuming she's having chemo, send her a few scarves and/or hats. Maybe a thin hat for sleeping.

      Gossip, jokes, all that helps too. Don't make every correspondence about cancer bc she wants to feel normal too.

      See if you can help set up a meal calendar among her friends/neighbors/colleagues. Cooked meals made a difference when I was too run down after chemo to cook.
      Best wishes

      1 comment

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