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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Are you able to use your arm normally after an auxillary node dissection? Does it affect day to day life?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jayme, I had a lot of limited mobility in my right arm. I tried doing exercises at home to improve this but in the end I decided to go to a Physical Therapist. I've been seeing her for 2 months now and she has helped my tremendously!!! Before..I couldn't take my shirt off by myself. But now, I...

      more

      Hi Jayme, I had a lot of limited mobility in my right arm. I tried doing exercises at home to improve this but in the end I decided to go to a Physical Therapist. I've been seeing her for 2 months now and she has helped my tremendously!!! Before..I couldn't take my shirt off by myself. But now, I can...plus reach places I couldn't before. if you decide to go to one....I highly suggest someone that is experienced with working with women who've had mastectomies and specialize in soft tissue massage as well. She not only makes me do exercises.....she begins with doing massage in my restricted area. It's been a life saver for me since I'll be going back to work on the 4th of June. Hugs Jayme.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had an auxiliary node dissection about 2 months ago. I was told to gradually stretch my arm with wall walks and not to lift anything over 10 pounds. Now I have pretty good mobility, but was told by a PT to stretch my arm more before I have radiation therapy (I'm in chemo therapy now). I do have...

      more

      I had an auxiliary node dissection about 2 months ago. I was told to gradually stretch my arm with wall walks and not to lift anything over 10 pounds. Now I have pretty good mobility, but was told by a PT to stretch my arm more before I have radiation therapy (I'm in chemo therapy now). I do have numbness in my armpit and back of my arm & am at risk for infection because of the lymph node removal & shouldn't have my blood pressure or blood drawn on that side forever. Hope this helps.

      1 comment
  • tamara carr Profile

    I have been diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ, stage 1. What is the best course or treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Tamara,
      Your doctor will probably give you some options. One of my friends is going through treatment for this right now. She is pre-menopausal and has several spots showing up on her mammogram that turned out to be malignant. She was hoping she could have a lumpectomy but it was too...

      more

      Hi Tamara,
      Your doctor will probably give you some options. One of my friends is going through treatment for this right now. She is pre-menopausal and has several spots showing up on her mammogram that turned out to be malignant. She was hoping she could have a lumpectomy but it was too widespread. She had a mastectomy and will be having reconstruction, no chemo.
      Your treatment plan depends on a lot of things on a cellular level. No two women's treatment plans seem to be the same. The pathology may be similar, with the same overall diagnosis but the treatment plans depend on that microscopic detection. Good luck to you! Sharon

      Comment
    • Jodie Brummet Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed with DCIS stage 0 last year. I was able to have lumpectomy followed by radiation. I am premenopausal and take Tamoxifen. I also had negative genetic test. Ask many questions and you will find what is the best treatment path for you.

      Comment
  • Brenda  Hawkins  Profile

    Stage 2, invasive ductal and lobule cancer, centinal node positive, 16 out of 16 axillary nodes negative, triple positive. Treatment??

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Brenda, there are lots of online sites you can access to see what the treatment is. I had Stage 2B IDC with one positive sentinal node. Did you have a Oncotype DX test? Even if another woman has exactly the same case, there could be microscopic differences that changes your course of...

      more

      Brenda, there are lots of online sites you can access to see what the treatment is. I had Stage 2B IDC with one positive sentinal node. Did you have a Oncotype DX test? Even if another woman has exactly the same case, there could be microscopic differences that changes your course of treatment. Diagnostics have become down to the cell level and beyond. Your treatment will be tailor-made just for you and your type of cancer. If you don't get an answer here, it is just because someone with that type of cancer isn't reading this at the moment. There is another site called Adjuvant Online... you sign-up as a doctor, and have access. It can give you probably more information than you want. I hope somebody checks in here who can give you some personal experience with this type of breast cancer. All of us here have had our own stories of breast cancer and treatment. No matter what, we ALL support each other and we all know the paths we have walked. Don't be afraid to ask questions. If things don't pass the "gut feelings" do not hesitate to get a second opinion... or even a third. Hang in there, gal.

      2 comments
  • Linda Leist Profile

    How long does treatment last?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on the type and stage of the breast cancer. We are all different as far as treatment and length of time it takes. Mine took 4 months from start to finish but I was placed on 5 years of hormone treatment. Sharon

      Comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hmmm - I've been in treatment for a year now and still have a few months to go. Then maybe 5 years of hormones. Stage 3, grade 3b, her 2 've. Stay strong!

      Comment

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