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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Melony  Taylor Profile

    I am newly diagnosed, and wondering what all my options may be. I haven't even met with the surgeon yet. I was wondering what some of my options are.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Melany,
      So sorry you have had this diagnosis but you have plenty of company out here. You will be presented with a lot of options. Each of those options will have percentages attached to them as far as beating this disease. Treatment plans depend on many, many, findings that have to do with...

      more

      Melany,
      So sorry you have had this diagnosis but you have plenty of company out here. You will be presented with a lot of options. Each of those options will have percentages attached to them as far as beating this disease. Treatment plans depend on many, many, findings that have to do with your own unique disease. Even though you may be diagnosed with the same type of breast cancer, your treatment may be completely different than the next woman's. Discovery is based on a cellular level and the best treatment will be advised depending on those findings. Your head will be spinning as you attend your soon to be appointments. I would advise you take along a family member, or a good friend to take notes, and listen to what is being said. You will have a lot thrown at you and it is difficult to take it all in. You could also record your sessions to play back as a reminder. We are here to help you as much as we can. Women want to know what is going to happen along the way. PLEASE do not be afraid to ask your questions to the team of people who will be caring for you. This is the most important time in your life when YOU have to be your own best advocate. Do not be a shrinking violet at you are the most important part of this journey. Approach this with strength, courage, and humor. You will need the support of all the folks you can enlist. We don't know what your treatment plan is going to be because it all depends on the outcome of the specific tests you are going to have. If things don't sound quite right to you, GET A SECOND OPINION!
      Hang in there... remember, we are always here for you. You WILL make it! Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I was diagnosed i

      Comment
  • carol butler Profile

    just told that i have invasive lobular breast cancer and it is involving my whole breast - see surgeon next week - Does this mean that it definitely would have metastasized ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    almost 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      No I'm invasive lobular known as ILC on all the sites. I'm stage 3 with a 7.3 cm mass. Here is the good mews I had clean nodes and cancer no where else. I though everything in the book at it and I am 2 1/2 years cancer free. It isn't a death sentence! It's a tough but doable journey. God Bless...

      more

      No I'm invasive lobular known as ILC on all the sites. I'm stage 3 with a 7.3 cm mass. Here is the good mews I had clean nodes and cancer no where else. I though everything in the book at it and I am 2 1/2 years cancer free. It isn't a death sentence! It's a tough but doable journey. God Bless you journey.

      2 comments
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am sorry that you have joined us. Surgery often confirms a diagnosis in my case it bumped the stage up.

      You won't know the extent of it until
      Surgery and additional scans. I hope they are all done quickly and the results go your way.

      Cancer to some extent becomes a full
      Time in until you...

      more

      I am sorry that you have joined us. Surgery often confirms a diagnosis in my case it bumped the stage up.

      You won't know the extent of it until
      Surgery and additional scans. I hope they are all done quickly and the results go your way.

      Cancer to some extent becomes a full
      Time in until you know where it isn't. I'm sorry you have this worry. Breath be brave be smart and be decisive Read cry and read again.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My Mother was told she has breast cancer in her right breast. However this was told to her from doing a Mammography and Ultra Sound. Should a biopsy be done to really rule out cancer or can they tell its cancer from those test? Scared for her!!!!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I had 2 areas that looked "highly suspicious" on a mammogram, additional views, and U/S. A biopsy was recommended to determine what they were. Some things, to doctors trained in reading the studies have certain appearance(s) that indicate if it is a cancer or not but the final determination is...

      more

      I had 2 areas that looked "highly suspicious" on a mammogram, additional views, and U/S. A biopsy was recommended to determine what they were. Some things, to doctors trained in reading the studies have certain appearance(s) that indicate if it is a cancer or not but the final determination is by doing a biopsy.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I was told at my biopsy appointment expect the test to come back as being cancer. Until there is a definite finding of cancer from a pathologist report, it isn't a real confirmation. I do believe that some types of breast cancer are nearly unmistakable in the way it looks. I found my own lump...

      more

      I was told at my biopsy appointment expect the test to come back as being cancer. Until there is a definite finding of cancer from a pathologist report, it isn't a real confirmation. I do believe that some types of breast cancer are nearly unmistakable in the way it looks. I found my own lump and there was no doubt in my mind it was cancer. The way it felt was vastly different from any other lump I had ever had. It wasn't a big surprise. Some breast cancers are very difficult to find and to tell from a mammogram and ultrasound. Have her get a biopsy for sure and hope for the best. In case this does turn out to be breast cancer, it doesn't mean a death sentence. Usually you go through treatment and just go on with your life. I was diagnosed at 59 and am now 68, and very healthy. My life is wonderful. Your Mom is lucky to have you in her corner. Please keep us posted. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Dx with DCIS,decided on mastectomy. Will have expander during initial surgery. No spec. blood tests ordered- should I be reminding either surgeon. I had taken estrogen/progesterone comb for years, have now stopped.Path report suggests tests.. I am 66

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I think it is always good to mention or question anything that you think might be pertinent to your case. Don't assume ANYTHING. This could be a very important.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      If you haven't told your doctors about the hormone replacement therapy you probably should. Another fact to put into the mix!

      1 comment

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