loading... close

Breast Cancer

 
Breast Cancer

Chapter: 3 - Breast Cancer

Subchapter: 3 - Types of Tumors

Remember, a tumor is a mass of abnormal tissue. There are two types of tumors: those that are non-cancerous, or ‘benign’, and those that are cancerous, which are ‘malignant’.

Benign Tumors
When a tumor is diagnosed as benign, doctors usually leave it alone rather than remove it. Even though these tumors are not aggressive toward surrounding tissue, they may continue to grow, pressing on organs and causing pain or other problems. In these situations, the tumor is removed, allowing pain or complications to subside.

Malignant Tumors
Malignant tumors are cancerous and aggressive, because they invade and damage surrounding tissue. When a tumor is suspected to be malignant, the doctor will preform a biopsy, a diagnostic procedure which we will cover in Sub–Chapter 4.3, to determine the severity of the tumor.

Metastatic Cancer
Metastatic cancer is when cancer cells of a malignant tumor spread to other parts of the body, usually through the lymph system, and form a secondary tumor.

Tumor Grades
Tumor grading is a system used to classify a malignant tumor based upon the severity of the mutation and the likelihood that it will spread. According to the National Cancer Institutes's tumor grading system, there are four grades: low grade (1), intermediate grade (2) and two types of high grades (3 & 4). Grade 1 tumor cells, for example, are the least aggressive in behavior; they still resemble healthy cells and multiply at a slower rate. Higher grade tumors tend to grow and spread more rapidly than tumors of a lower grade.

Tumor grades are not to be confused with cancer stages, which we will discuss in detail in Chapter 5.

In this chapter, we looked at where cancer usually begins, reasons why it grows, how it spreads, the importance of evaluating the tumor for certain receptors, and the difference between benign and malignant tumors.

Now it’s time to get a better understanding of your diagnosis.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    How can you tell a tumor from hard tissue from treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Daphne Beitman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease....

      more

      Get to know your breasts by doing monthly self exams and note/keep track of any abnormalities you believe you feel. A tumor will grow, normal dense tissue will not. When in doubt have your doctor schedule a mammogram, especially if you're under 40 years old with a family history of the disease. If you you have no family history have a yearly mammogram beginning at 40.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this...

      more

      I want to use this medium to share my testimony to the public, hopefully to safe life also, Am Brandi Harri, I was diagnosed of Breast Cancer Three years ago, when i had my last baby, my world came crashing down when my Doctor told me that nothing could be done to save me after fighting this deadly disease with Chemo And Radiation for Two Years but i refused to sit back and wait until the day it finally decides to take my life so i went in search of help which i found in the hands of Priest Babaka through his Cannabis oil/Herb Soap Supplement. God use him to bring life back to me and gave my life a meaning again,am alive now all because of him, sir God will continue to Bless you and your family for this good work and word of truth..If you have any issue of CANCER don't hestitate to contact him with this email : babaka.wolf@gmail.com

      Comment
  • Atlanta Woods Profile

    What is the life expectancy of someone with metastatic breast cancer? It's in her bones and spine but not in vital organs.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Martha Phillips Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have the same thing bones and spine I've had it for ten months doing good I take zometa and falsodex once a month right now I'm great no one is promised tomorrow pray and may God Bless You in your treatments

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    35 years old everything going perfect, Never thought I will ever be DX with breast cancer, How? and Why? Tears

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I understand exactly how you feel because I felt the same way. Once I got through the shock, I focused on treatment. I read as much as I could about my options and leaned on my husband and great friends. I learned a lot about myself through the experience. I am through all treatments and moving...

      more

      I understand exactly how you feel because I felt the same way. Once I got through the shock, I focused on treatment. I read as much as I could about my options and leaned on my husband and great friends. I learned a lot about myself through the experience. I am through all treatments and moving on with my life. My advice would be to take very good care of yourself through everything. Best of luck to you and keep us posted. God bless you.

      Comment
    • Elaine Mills Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Can't quite get you off my mind tonight. I am a member of a facebook group called We Are Sisters that has been a tremendous help. We started the group right after two women randomly walked me through my first few days of shock finding out I had cancer. I am so thankful for them all, and...

      more

      Can't quite get you off my mind tonight. I am a member of a facebook group called We Are Sisters that has been a tremendous help. We started the group right after two women randomly walked me through my first few days of shock finding out I had cancer. I am so thankful for them all, and encourage you to join us and ask questions there. It is hard to even know what questions to ask at this point. But I do know the random spinning that your head must be going through. My first day was shock and I was strong. The second day my face kept leaking, even though I didn't break down. The third day, I found myself alone at home and couldn't take it. I went to a bar and "celebrated" boobies. Was not one of my finer moments. The next day I "ran away from home", which ... I kept my family informed of where I was the whole time, but I just felt I needed to get away. The following day, I hid like a hermit and decided I was not fit for public consumption. Finally, I had the day come around that I admitted to myself and my husband that I was ready to comply with whatever was demanded of me. This journey you are about to embark upon is not just a physical challenge. It is an emotional rollercoaster. Know that however you feel is okay. Become selfish for the first time in your life. Start removing all negativity from your life now. Protect yourself from stress and drama. Know that we are out here to embrace you on your sleepless nights. I am having one of those tonight. I used to be sad for people who found out they had cancer. Now it breaks my heart with every new diagnosis. This is not easy, but it is doable. I have so many cool suggestions of things I did to help me through surgery and recovery that I would love to share with you when you are ready. I don't come on this site often, but will try to follow up on you. I want to know how you are doing.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was just diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma grade 2. Anyone out there with same situation? I am leaning towards lumpectomy, but wondering if it is the right way to go?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 7 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I opted for a bi lateral mastectomy, it gave me more peace of mind and I am glad I did it.

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      It would depend on so many different things. You mentioned your tumor is grade 2. Do you know what stage you are? Are you HER2 - or ? BRACA? What do your other tests results say?

      1 comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word