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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Madisyn Poulsen Profile

    I am fourteen and I have what looks like a second nipple on one of my breasts, it's a hard lump. Should I go get it checked out? Is it possible I might have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would absolutely get it checked out, better safe than sorry.

      Comment
    • Myles Digby Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It is extremely rare for someone your age to develop breast cancer, but it wouldn't hurt to have your doctor check it out, to give you peace of mind.

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    90%Nylon 10%Spandex Bras good for wear .... is there any risk for a breast cancer by wearing these kind of a bras for a long time?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I don't believe bras cause breast cancer...

      1 comment
    • Roz Potenza Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I have never heard a credible correlation to breast cancer and bras. Nope. Nothing. Wear one. Don't wear one. Underwire. Au Naturale. Have at it.

      Do get yearly mammograms. Do check yourself in the shower for lumps. Do get something checked RIGHT AWAY if you feel it. Do have a healthy...

      more

      I have never heard a credible correlation to breast cancer and bras. Nope. Nothing. Wear one. Don't wear one. Underwire. Au Naturale. Have at it.

      Do get yearly mammograms. Do check yourself in the shower for lumps. Do get something checked RIGHT AWAY if you feel it. Do have a healthy life. :)

      Comment
  • Christina Archambault Profile

    26 year old her 1 positive stage 2b 3 nosds pos. I get my last chemo April 19th ! I have been really strong for the most part threw this chemo! I find I am getting scared for my future as the chemo is coming to an end .. Did u worrie bout your future ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    about 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I have heard this many, many, times! People have a sense of loss when they are coming to the end of their chemotherapy. You feel protected and cared for during your treatment and all of a sudden, it is over. So for everyone who has this feeling, it is oh so common. You are like a fledgling...

      more

      I have heard this many, many, times! People have a sense of loss when they are coming to the end of their chemotherapy. You feel protected and cared for during your treatment and all of a sudden, it is over. So for everyone who has this feeling, it is oh so common. You are like a fledgling getting pushed out into the world to fly on your own. I on the other hand, counted the days until I was done and although I liked everybody, I was thrilled to get back to my life, my horses, and my HAIR! I think this feeling of a little bit of loss, and this safe caccoon, is something that will fade as you transition to another part of your treatment or back to your regular life. My congratulations for being done with your chemo..... YAHOOO!!! You will continue to be strong but you are saying good bye to this part of your treatment. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I'll be finished May 8th with chemo and I too feel apprehensive. Chemo has really tired me out and the affects of it are becoming more but still there's the comforting thought that chemo is fighting the cancer. I keep thinking that I must take one day at a time. There are still more procedures to...

      more

      I'll be finished May 8th with chemo and I too feel apprehensive. Chemo has really tired me out and the affects of it are becoming more but still there's the comforting thought that chemo is fighting the cancer. I keep thinking that I must take one day at a time. There are still more procedures to go through to be cancer free.

      1 comment

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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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