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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Alexandra Gomez Profile

    What age can girls get breast cancer ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones,...

      more

      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones, including hormone disrupters in the environment.

      • As with many other diseases, your risk of breast cancer goes up as you get older. For example, according to the American Cancer Society, about 1 out of 8 invasive breast cancers develop in women younger than 45. About 2 out of 3 invasive breast cancers are found in women 55 or older. In fact, the aging process is the biggest risk factor for breast cancer. That's because the longer we live, there are more opportunities for genetic damage (mutations) in the body. And as we age, our bodies are less capable of repairing genetic damage.

      • About 1 in 8 women in the United States (12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

      • A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. About 20-30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a family history of breast cancer.

      These steps will help lower your risk:
      • maintaining a healthy weight
      • exercising regularly
      • limiting alcohol
      • eating nutritious food
      • never smoking (or quitting if you do smoke)

      Comment
    • Jessica Worcester Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I'm 20

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Biopsy results May 5th was secondary angiosarcoma due to Radiation 10 yrs ago. Has anyone been through this successfully?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2004
    over 4 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      It sounds like you are in good hands. I did see a study, that I believe may still be ongoing. It was 9 years after, and women who had the entire radiated area excised had not had a recurrence. I think that lumpectomy would be risky , and there would be a better chance of cancer not recurring, ...

      more

      It sounds like you are in good hands. I did see a study, that I believe may still be ongoing. It was 9 years after, and women who had the entire radiated area excised had not had a recurrence. I think that lumpectomy would be risky , and there would be a better chance of cancer not recurring, with mastectomy with good wide margins. Best wishes on your recovery.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It must be rare....I have never heard of it although, cancer can be a side effect of lots of treatments. I hope you keep us posted as you go through treatment. Have faith darlin' and take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    if you are diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer and its in the stage 111B are there good survival rates?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I don't believe in living by numbers at any stage or kind of cancer. Stay positive, be proactive and you can live a very long life. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      They don't account for précis ting additional health issues. They don't account for the support. The exercise the decisions. The lifestyle and nutrition. Gosh. It's a statistic and who know anything from that? I'd rather live in denial than dwell in depression. So I choose to know and...

      more

      They don't account for précis ting additional health issues. They don't account for the support. The exercise the decisions. The lifestyle and nutrition. Gosh. It's a statistic and who know anything from that? I'd rather live in denial than dwell in depression. So I choose to know and then move beyond and defy. Wish me luck and you luck.

      Comment
  • shumani ndou Profile

    i have a pain nd swellen on my right breast . . ns dr said is problem tissies is that meas sign of cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It is difficult to say what is going on. You probably need testing like a mammogram, ultrasound and maybe a biopsy. We can't say because we aren't doctors. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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