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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My joints ache after chemo treatment. Any suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have used that joint juice stuff and a lot of water . They have it by the ensure stuff , it helps because the chemo dehydrates every part if you . I mean every part .

      Comment
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Claritin and Tylenol pm at night

      Comment
  • lauren neely Profile

    What happens if you get breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Well, my advice is that you listen to your doctors, get second opinions,

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Also, check out the learn videos on this site - they'll help educate you quite a bit.

      Comment
  • Sandra Allen Profile

    i am having a double mastectomy in jan do you have depression afterwards

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the...

      more

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the realization of the loss of a breast means different things to different women. It is difficult to predict how you will feel. My breasts are small and I didn't particularly have any attachment to them in regards to body image. I just wanted to get rid of the breast cancer and was very happy to get rid of the body part that contained it.
      I chose not to have reconstruction and have done well with a prosthesis. I was 59 when diagnosed and made this decision. It is different if women are diagnosed in their 20's, 30's, 40's etc. A large percentage of them have reconstruction which sounds like it is a long, procedure and not very comfortable. Anyway.... as for depression, if you tend to get depressed or feel down, it may be a problem but I can't say it is as a matter of fact. Hang in there darlin' you are getting rid of a lousy sneaky disease and that IS the most important thing. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and...

      more

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and you are right Sharon it is long and uncomfortable but I would do it all again. The part of the mastectomy that I found difficult was the recovery and not being to do the things I was used to doing like driving and showering on my own. Good luck to you Sandra, you will be fine and like Sharon said you are getting rid of an awful illness and it is the best way to do it. Let us know are you going as you progress. Cheers

      Comment
  • kim sosa Profile

    I was diagnosed IDCS stage 2 or 3A and everyone from Dr. to my bc sisters always tell me I should be around to watch my children grow up. But then the Dr. that works with my chemo Dr. tells me my survival rate doesn't look good. Those words crushed me

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree w everyone. You need another doctor who is going to be encouraging and positive and will fight with you!! I was dx w invasive ductal in Oct. It was stage 2 with nodal involvement and I am doing great. The chemo completely dissolved the tumor and I had surgery Wed to excise the tissue and...

      more

      I agree w everyone. You need another doctor who is going to be encouraging and positive and will fight with you!! I was dx w invasive ductal in Oct. It was stage 2 with nodal involvement and I am doing great. The chemo completely dissolved the tumor and I had surgery Wed to excise the tissue and nodes. I have 2 little girls and I've been fighting since the start to see them grow up. You have great survival hope but you need positive people treating you!

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      That's horrible Kim! What an awful thing to say!!! Don't you listen to that. Is this your oncologist? Your doctor should be encouraging & hopeful! It's so important in your healing. No one knows but God how long you have left on this earth. I began my journey with stage 3C last May. And now I'm...

      more

      That's horrible Kim! What an awful thing to say!!! Don't you listen to that. Is this your oncologist? Your doctor should be encouraging & hopeful! It's so important in your healing. No one knows but God how long you have left on this earth. I began my journey with stage 3C last May. And now I'm cancer free!!!! There is always always always hope!!!! think this doctor should be booted to the curb!

      Comment

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