loading... close

Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone tried cannabis for your breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 2 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Samantha (Admin) Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Mary Anne, it seems as if there is a glitch with the anonymous feature. We will be working to resolve this issue asap.

      Comment
    • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile
      anonymous
      stage_4 Patient

      I don't mean to ask these questions anonymously, my name is Mary Anne and I belong to the sight. I need to find out what I'm doing wrong.

      Comment
  • Pat Lyons Profile

    14 yrs after partial masectomy and lymph removal just found a lump in upper armpit not fluid. What can cause this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Any changes in one's body need to be seen by a doctor. Testing will probably need to be done to see what it may or may not be.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Pat,
      That's why doctor's get paid the big bucks.... we can't guess. Have you had an infection, a cold, a tooth abcess, etc. lately? Something like that could cause some swelling in a lymph node. How long has it been there? DId is show up quickly? Is it painful? Those are probably some of...

      more

      Pat,
      That's why doctor's get paid the big bucks.... we can't guess. Have you had an infection, a cold, a tooth abcess, etc. lately? Something like that could cause some swelling in a lymph node. How long has it been there? DId is show up quickly? Is it painful? Those are probably some of the questions your doctor is going to ask. As Betti says, some testing is probably going to take place, and your doctor might even choose to remove the entire thing. Primary importance is to get in and have it looked at by your oncologist. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Karen G Profile

    Had my hair buzzed off today. How long does it take before my scalp stops hurting/feeling sore?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • NancyStradley- Pezzi Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My chemo bud Michelle told me a trick. Get a lint brush and roll it over your scalp! Helps get rid of hair and feels sooo good! I brushed lol my scalp daily!

      1 comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The hair will get a little finer and softer. Right now it's bristly and coarse so it's sore. It'll ease up!

      Comment
  • Cassie Basham Profile

    Anyone fallen into the "intermediate category" on the oncotype test, and then had the EndoPredict test done to get a definite answer to benefit of chemo? My RS was 27.

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    12 months 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I only had the OncoType DX test as at the time was the only one available and was told I was aiming for a number of 18 or below. I came in right at 18 and my Onc. told me I could get by without chemo. but she used another program of some sort, plugging in my info., and it said my recurrence rate...

      more

      I only had the OncoType DX test as at the time was the only one available and was told I was aiming for a number of 18 or below. I came in right at 18 and my Onc. told me I could get by without chemo. but she used another program of some sort, plugging in my info., and it said my recurrence rate would drop significantly so I chose to do chemo. and am glad I did.

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Maybe Endo is new, I've never heard of it. My onco score was 17. I had decided to have chemo if my score was over 20. I think that 26 was the number that my doctor said I must have chemo, and 19 to 25, we would have to discuss.

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word