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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there such a thing as post tramatic syndrome after breast cancer treatment? If there is I got broadsided with it today.Wasn"t prepared for it!!

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Morning Jo. I think with anything traumatic in your life it is possible to have a bout with post traumatic stress syndrome And dealing with breast cancer is very traumatic we stay strong we stay positive we keep on moving but yet some days it all seems so overwhelming. What we have been...

      more

      Morning Jo. I think with anything traumatic in your life it is possible to have a bout with post traumatic stress syndrome And dealing with breast cancer is very traumatic we stay strong we stay positive we keep on moving but yet some days it all seems so overwhelming. What we have been through and it just never seems to end. Those small mighty pills throw us for a loop. Your journey has been an intense journey I cannot even imagine how it was. Mine was a piece of cake kind of took the easy way out with the multiple mastectomies. So you are definitely entitled to days of being overwhelmed I certainly have those days have myself a little cry then tell myself it's not that bad start to count my blessings and try my best to get through the day. I'll call a friend we'll commiserate together and laugh. You are not alone. Sending you a big big gentle bear hug.

      5 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I completely agree... it is the most traumatic event most of us have ever faced. One day you are sailing along and next you are hit with a diagnosis of breast cancer and mentally facing your own mortality. It is sobering, and a pretty tough journey. I am on an anti-depressant or I would be...

      more

      I completely agree... it is the most traumatic event most of us have ever faced. One day you are sailing along and next you are hit with a diagnosis of breast cancer and mentally facing your own mortality. It is sobering, and a pretty tough journey. I am on an anti-depressant or I would be sitting in the corner drooling and talking to myself. I feel... "normal" and can think rationally. I think we all have up and down days. I find much support with everyone on this site because we are pretty much in the same boat. Here we can find total understanding and acceptance. If you haven't been where we have, it is difficult to have any idea of what your body and mind goes through. We are all on this battlefield together, my sisters. Love and understanding to all. Sharon

      3 comments
  • Marsha Sievert Profile

    My sister was diagnosed with Stage 4 Lobular Invasive Carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma. My mother has ductal cancer. I was diagnosed (by needle biopsy), with Lobular Carcinoma in Situ. In lieu of my family history, what would recommendations be?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Marsha,
      I would think your oncologist would recommend some family DNA testing with a geneticist for the BRCA gene. Therefore, if you have a daughter, granddaughter, and you test positive, there would be several prophylactic procedures that could be done.
      I don't know if you are asking about...

      more

      Marsha,
      I would think your oncologist would recommend some family DNA testing with a geneticist for the BRCA gene. Therefore, if you have a daughter, granddaughter, and you test positive, there would be several prophylactic procedures that could be done.
      I don't know if you are asking about recommendations for treatment but that is best done by an oncologist, surgeon, and radiologist. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      What does your doctor(s) recommend? Like Sharon said DNA testing in most likelihood depending on other relatives of yours. You need to be asking your entire team and see what they have to say about it if you haven't already.

      Comment
  • Vicki Geer Fournier Profile

    Is there anything I can do to get my body/immune system prepared for chemo (i.e. take vitamins plus in addition take vitamin C)?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Vicki, I think just eating a well balanced diet and most important to drinking plenty of fluids. Some oncologists will warn you that there are supplements that actually interfere with the action of the chemotherapy. It is best to talk this over with your oncologist to make sure. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Make sure your oncologist knows everything you decide to try. Hydrate is my best advice. I did taxotere/cytoxan rest, hydrate and walk on the days I could were the best thing for me. I never ended up in hopital or missed a treatment.

      Comment
  • Anj Donahue Profile

    Is it okay to use tampons while undergoing chemo treatment? I've been trying to find solid answers and haven't found much.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would think its just a matter of preference. I used tampons for the one menstrual cycle that I had during treatment. after that one, it stopped for about 7 months. I finally got it back in march- 4 months after my last chemo treatment. I have just turned 30- age does play a part in having...

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      I would think its just a matter of preference. I used tampons for the one menstrual cycle that I had during treatment. after that one, it stopped for about 7 months. I finally got it back in march- 4 months after my last chemo treatment. I have just turned 30- age does play a part in having you cycle return to normal. Hope this helps!

      Comment
    • Anj Donahue Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thanks Tiffani! I'm 26, so I certainly wasn't sure what to expect. I was told it likely would disappear during treatment, but apparently not! I thought I had read that it was not a good idea to use tampons because of increased likelihood of infection? But I guess I will just be extra diligent...

      more

      Thanks Tiffani! I'm 26, so I certainly wasn't sure what to expect. I was told it likely would disappear during treatment, but apparently not! I thought I had read that it was not a good idea to use tampons because of increased likelihood of infection? But I guess I will just be extra diligent about changing it more frequently?

      Comment
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