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Penny's Story

About her story

"I knew I had to take this horrible, bad thing and turn it in to something positive."

In March 2010, Penny was diagnosed with Stage IIB Triple-negative breast cancer.

"There's something about when you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, it's like being elected to a club that you never wanted to be a part of," says Penny. "But, when you're there, you're really glad there's other people with you."

A busy salon owner, Penny realized that her diagnosis and treatment would completely change her lifestyle. But, through breast cancer, she learned that it was her family and support that meant most to her.

Watch Penny's story and learn how a rare form of breast cancer changed her life and helped her realize that all things work out for good in the end.

Related Questions

  • Karen Milburn Profile

    Going for insertion of a port on Monday. I forgot to ask how long the procedure lasts, anyone know an average time? anything about your experience that you would like to share?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      I would plan on about 4 hours at the hospital but plan to rest the rest of that day, and take it easy the day after that.
      For most people it's a simple procedure. I found out that day I have difficult chest anatomy and mine was more difficult and painful.
      Be good to yourself and don't overdo:)

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It was a big day for me because I went from having the port placed to having my first chemo. Treatment. Usually it lasts about 3 hours from start to finish. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have had 3 EC and 3 TAX to date. My oncologist wants me to have 2 further TAX to further shrink the lump. What is the point as I am having the breast removed anyway? Thanks.

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Chemo is systemic so maybe it's to kill any other cancer cells?

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Patient

      Thank-you for your replies. I don't think they are looking for clear margins as the breast is going to be removed in any event.

      I understand the systemic nature of chemo, but my onc/surgeon did not appear to be overly concerned with this aspect.

      The thoughts of the surgeon seems centered on the...

      more

      Thank-you for your replies. I don't think they are looking for clear margins as the breast is going to be removed in any event.

      I understand the systemic nature of chemo, but my onc/surgeon did not appear to be overly concerned with this aspect.

      The thoughts of the surgeon seems centered on the lump, she really wants to shrink it right down.

      Comment
  • nicole blagburn Profile

    Anyone taking tamoxifen? That's in my treatment plan and the side effects scare me! Would love some input.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I have been on it since Feb 22nd. No real side effects. Benefits outweigh if any bad effects. If you do have some bad side effect, you can always talk to your doctor about stopping. Give it a shot though. Good luck!

      Comment
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I'm on tamoxifen, the worst side effect is the hot flashes but you can do things to minimize or make them more bearable.

      Comment
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