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Gloria Taylor Edwards's Story

About her story

A 2013 year-end message from a one-year breast cancer survivor; shares encouragement to continue the fight for a cure

Related Questions

  • Mimi Arroyo Profile

    My friend had stage 4 cancer. What can I do to help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Help her live and love her life.

      Comment
    • Deborah Camacho Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      She has a lot to learn and her emotions are probably high. If you can help her get to her appointments, if she needs help. Help her keep notes on her diagnosis and treatment. Let her cry if she needs to cry.

      Comment
  • Felicia Harper Profile

    How can i keep my cancer from returning?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 2 answers
    • M Aycock Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Pray and get rid of stress as much as humanly possible ! I am 3 yrs out w TNBC and still worry at times- DON'T LET CANCER RULE YOUR LIFE!! Much love

      Comment
    • Denise P. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I've been all over this question. So far from what my studies show changing your diet to mostly veggies and fruit will assist in alkalizing your body. Drinking clean water and plenty of it as well as walking will help greatly. As our other sister stated controlling your stress and being spiritual...

      more

      I've been all over this question. So far from what my studies show changing your diet to mostly veggies and fruit will assist in alkalizing your body. Drinking clean water and plenty of it as well as walking will help greatly. As our other sister stated controlling your stress and being spiritual grounded is the major key! I speak out loud saying I'm stronger than is!!!!!!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone been treated with Neupogen or Neulasta to help increase the absolute neutrophil count when on Taxol or Carboplatin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I received them too, and they really caused my bones to ache. My oncologist told me to take Claritin the morning of the shot to reduce the pain. I was very surprised to find that it worked.

      Comment
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I got the neulasta shot after my first 3 A/C treatments. I was able to skip the last shot for treatment #4 of A/C and I didn't need it for my 4 taxol treatments.

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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