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Gloria Taylor Edwards's Story

About her story

A 2013 year-end message from a one-year breast cancer survivor; shares encouragement to continue the fight for a cure

Related Questions

  • Helene LaPoint Profile

    I have been diagnose with metastatic breast cancer which spread to the liver they put me on faslodex shots can any body give me some answers on this idc hormone receptor postive her2 neg

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. ...

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      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. I am just guessing.... but you will probably be on this type of drug and will have scans to see how the liver tumors shrink. If they don't, they will switch you to another type of hormone blocking drug. Many women are on different types of treatments to shrink tumors before they have surgery. What is your doctor saying about your treatment plan? We have a great big family here on this board. We are always sorry to get more members but it is quite a sisterhood of women who have been there, done that. Each woman's treatment is different from another depending on her particular breast cancer cells. Collectively, we try to help support each other. Hang in there, Helene.... You put on those big girl panties and FIGHT LIKE A GIRL!!!
      Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is pre-cancerous carcinoma cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      That's not a term that I have heard. Carcinoma is the formal word for cancer. If you have a pre-cancerous abnormality you need to have this addressed ASAP. This probably means the cells seen are in the process of turning into cancer and will be cancer in the future. Get this checked.

      1 comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I don't think there is such a thing. I know they found a single polyp on my initial colonoscopy and the report said it was "precancerous". When I asked my PCP what that meant she told me if I hadn't had that screening colonoscopy as I had no systems that polyp would have turned into cancer so I...

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      I don't think there is such a thing. I know they found a single polyp on my initial colonoscopy and the report said it was "precancerous". When I asked my PCP what that meant she told me if I hadn't had that screening colonoscopy as I had no systems that polyp would have turned into cancer so I was thankful I had the test done. In fact in thinking about it there is no such thing as precancerous cancer or carcinoma for that matter.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Do you have any inspirational quotes, lyrics, or verses to get you through rough times? Please share your favorites!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Samantha (Admin) Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      "She stood in the storm, and when the wind did not blow her way, she adjusted her sails" - Elizabeth Edwards

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      "What doesn't kill me will only make me stronger." Through any type of difficult time in my life, I knew, I would grow in knowledge and strength from the experience. I always had the idea that even on my worst days, I would get better. I felt confident I would walk through the fire of...

      more

      "What doesn't kill me will only make me stronger." Through any type of difficult time in my life, I knew, I would grow in knowledge and strength from the experience. I always had the idea that even on my worst days, I would get better. I felt confident I would walk through the fire of treatment and come out the other side, a winnerl I knew why I was given the burden of having breast cancer.... it was because I am a blabbermouth and would yak it up to other women to get mammobrams and do self checks. I run an email information service for my horse community. (Vast majority are women) I told them when I found out I had breast cancer and I encouraged them to get their checks done because mine was found in an early stage. I also wanted to show women, the diagnosis of breast cancer is not a death sentence. I didn't want to keep my disease a secret because I wanted no rumors going around. Even when I was going through chemotherapy, I carried on my life as close to normal as possible. I wanted to shine the light of day on breast cancer and SHOW people what it was like. I received wonderful support and received a lot of positive feedback about yearly checks. I also had several women share they were going through scares of ultrasounds and biopsy's and hope I was able to help them get through it. Only one woman having DCIS and another woman had stage 1 IDC, both successfully treated and back to life again. I never question why, if by divine reason, I was chosen to have breast cancer... I talk too much! Live your life to it's fullest, help and love other people, Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is it common to have both Invasive and Non Invasive Breast Cancer in the same area?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • sandy glisman Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yes, I had invasive adenocarcinoma and dcis in the same breast. Hope i helped!!

      Comment
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I cannot cite you a scientifically valid statistics so cannot give you clear stats about whether this is common or not.

      I can tell you I had 6mm invasive tubular carcinoma of the right breast along with less than 5% of non-invasive DCIS - all in the same patch of flesh. Not just in the same...

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      I cannot cite you a scientifically valid statistics so cannot give you clear stats about whether this is common or not.

      I can tell you I had 6mm invasive tubular carcinoma of the right breast along with less than 5% of non-invasive DCIS - all in the same patch of flesh. Not just in the same breast but in the same location.

      So it is certainly possible for this to happen - presumably even more than two types - but I have no reliable data on how common this is.

      Comment

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