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Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Bettyann Rosenthal Profile

    I have Stage III HER2-pos Breast Cancer. I have Medicare, it pays 80%. Is there not good doctors and treatment for people who don't have secondary ins. or cash growing in the backyard?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      The American Cancer Society has a lot of great information concerning financial matters, support, and so much more. There are offices in most major cities, or you can reach them on their website which includes a toll-free number. Best wishes to you Bettyann on your journey.

      3 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      If a diagnosis of breast cancer isn't already lousy.... then you have to worry about how you are going to pay for the treatment. We had catastrophic coverage because the insurance premiums were so expensive. My husband and I had to buy our own coverage. The premiums were high and so were the...

      more

      If a diagnosis of breast cancer isn't already lousy.... then you have to worry about how you are going to pay for the treatment. We had catastrophic coverage because the insurance premiums were so expensive. My husband and I had to buy our own coverage. The premiums were high and so were the deductable. Diana is giving you a great suggestion. Contact the American Cancer Society. They gave us a gas card so we could get to my appointments. They also had other programs and suggestions to help you out. If you run into expensive prescriptions you can't afford, I found if you contact the drug manufacturers, they sometimes have programs for low cost drugs or free. That was a huge help when I needed a special drug to combat nausea. Our community also had a benefit dinner and auction for us when I was diagnosed.... what a huge blessing that was!!!

      Comment
  • beverly moody Profile

    Is anyone on hormone therapy and if so, how are you doing? Will know in two weeks if I am a candidate for it.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Beverly, I have entered my 5th year of the hormone blocking drug Femara or Letrozole. I will be glad when I get to quit. For me, the side effects have been hot flashes, and joint and leg pain. It has been tolerable but for me, the hot flashes have been the most troubling. At first they...

      more

      Hi Beverly, I have entered my 5th year of the hormone blocking drug Femara or Letrozole. I will be glad when I get to quit. For me, the side effects have been hot flashes, and joint and leg pain. It has been tolerable but for me, the hot flashes have been the most troubling. At first they were just plain ugly. They have gotten better but still a pain. Everybody has different reactions and I always hesitate to say something negative because I don't want to scare anybody from taking this possibly life-saving treatment. The side effects were small price to pay and I am very thankful this is available and I was er/pr positive and her2 negative.

      Comment
    • beverly moody Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yea those are small but peaty side effects will keep in touch good luck take care

      Comment
  • Brenda  Hawkins  Profile

    Stage 2, invasive ductal and lobule cancer, centinal node positive, 16 out of 16 axillary nodes negative, triple positive. Treatment??

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 8 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Brenda, there are lots of online sites you can access to see what the treatment is. I had Stage 2B IDC with one positive sentinal node. Did you have a Oncotype DX test? Even if another woman has exactly the same case, there could be microscopic differences that changes your course of...

      more

      Brenda, there are lots of online sites you can access to see what the treatment is. I had Stage 2B IDC with one positive sentinal node. Did you have a Oncotype DX test? Even if another woman has exactly the same case, there could be microscopic differences that changes your course of treatment. Diagnostics have become down to the cell level and beyond. Your treatment will be tailor-made just for you and your type of cancer. If you don't get an answer here, it is just because someone with that type of cancer isn't reading this at the moment. There is another site called Adjuvant Online... you sign-up as a doctor, and have access. It can give you probably more information than you want. I hope somebody checks in here who can give you some personal experience with this type of breast cancer. All of us here have had our own stories of breast cancer and treatment. No matter what, we ALL support each other and we all know the paths we have walked. Don't be afraid to ask questions. If things don't pass the "gut feelings" do not hesitate to get a second opinion... or even a third. Hang in there, gal.

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    What will 100% fight off my moms cancer for life. Chemotherapy or radiation? She chose surgery & radiation. She has several lumps in her left breast and lymph node and is at high risk. What is a better treatment and why?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When posed with a question like this it is impossible to know the answer. Each woman diagnosis and cancer are different and unique. Without hearing the pathology of the disease, ours would be only a guess. This is a decision she has made because of the information she received, her perception...

      more

      When posed with a question like this it is impossible to know the answer. Each woman diagnosis and cancer are different and unique. Without hearing the pathology of the disease, ours would be only a guess. This is a decision she has made because of the information she received, her perception of the impact of the different treatments and her oncologist's guidance. You are a wonderful daughter for caring and loving your Mom and wanting to help her through this very tough time. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It's never 100%, but I would suggest having a second opinion. Everyone's different, but I was surprised with lymphnode involvement, that they didn't suggest chemo too. Never hurts to ask another specialist before making a decision . I did. Same advice but I liked the second team of docs...

      more

      It's never 100%, but I would suggest having a second opinion. Everyone's different, but I was surprised with lymphnode involvement, that they didn't suggest chemo too. Never hurts to ask another specialist before making a decision . I did. Same advice but I liked the second team of docs better! Best wishes to you and your mother

      Comment

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