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Renee's Story

About her story

"I will still smile and I will still fight."

After discovering a lump during a self-breast exam, Renee scheduled a doctor's appointment and was later diagnosed with an aggressive form of Stage 4 breast cancer.

"The moment I heard that I had breast cancer, I had a game plan in my head that I was going to fight," said Renee.

Renee's prognosis for treatment was difficult, but she decided early on that she was going to fight. Even after losing the use of her legs, Renee faced breast cancer with a smile.

Watch Renee's story and discover why her inspiring testimony and life touched the hearts of the producers, directors, and staff behind the National Breast Cancer Foundation's Beyond the Shock program.

Related Questions

  • Vicky gannon Profile

    I have had discharge, pain and lump in armpit.Had a sonogram 2 yrs. ago and found nothing. Should i be concerned now?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Things can change over two years. I would go to your doctor ASAP for tests to determine the source of your pain, discharge, and the lump in your armpit. If by chance it's cancer, the sooner you catch it the better.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My good friend has just been diagnosed with breast cancer. What can I do or say to help her through this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Francine Williams Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile...

      more

      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile that is one thing Cancer can't take from u

      2 comments
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of...

      more

      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of you today. Also, don't say "let me know if there's something I can do" bc it puts the burden back on her and it's so hard to ask for help. Instead, ask when her appointments are and plan to go with her (if she has no one else that can go), stop by (call or text first) with a meal when she's sick from chemo and clean up a little while you're there. Bring funny movies or books ('the sh*t my dad says' is hilarious--someone gave it to me), bring gossip, distractions are good. Try not to probe by asking a ton of questions all the time, but let her know you're always there to listen. She'll start to open up when she wants. If she's sad, let her be. Be comforting but don't give advice. (like empathize and say you know it must be hard and scary, but don't say things like, look for the silver linking, or try to be positive...some days, she'll just be sad and angry will need a shoulder to cry on)

      When she's feeling well, keep her busy! If you aren't always free, create a calendar for friends/colleagues that can cook, visit, take her out, etc.

      If she plans on wearing a wig, offer to go with her to pick it out before her hair falls out. Then, when it starts to fall out, offer to shave it (my friend gave me a Mohawk).

      When her treatments are over, months from now, keep checking in...that's a tough time emotionally, even when hair starts to grow back. Breast cancer is life changing and we still think about it even post treatment.

      Of course, you can't do it all, but get your friends together to help with all of this.

      I've truly seen who my true friends are with how they've dealt with my diagnosis. I'm young(32), and I've read and agree that breast cancer is lonely for young women bc most of our peers have no idea what it's like. If your friend is young, help her check out programs for young women with BC

      best wishes

      Comment
  • lisa epstein Profile

    I had stage 1 2.1mm and grade 3, I had a lumpectomy and am er positive nodes neg. and clear margins. What kind of treatment do you think I will need now?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would talk with your doctor but I chose to have radiation after the lumpectomy and am now taking Tamoxifen. I know this is a scary time but I wanted to do everything I could to keep from having another cancer. God bless you and be with you through your journey.

      2 comments
  • Laura Gaspard Profile

    Are Mammograms Painful?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Juliette Zweig Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I just got one yesterday. I personally don’t find them painful, and not even that uncomfortable. My breasts are very tender and I have no problem. Plus, they are fairly quick. You’re out and about fast. Making the annual visit no big deal.

      Comment
    • Kim Flackey Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No. I find them to be more uncomfortable than painful. It also depends on the time of the month. Your breasts are usually more tender right before your period. Try and schedule it after your period and this should help. Of all medical tests, this is the one I dread the least. It's no biggie.

      2 comments

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