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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • kim sosa Profile

    I'm about to start my chemo is it safe to go to a baseball game and nascar race? These are tickets that were bought before I was diagnosed. I'm guessing propably not because of my immune system being low. Do I just stay in the house? Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      If you haven't started chemo yet Kim....then I would say go & have a good time. When you begin chemo there might be times when you don't want to risk going out in public because of your counts being low. But if you haven't begun yet....in my opinion I would go & have a good time! :)

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I went to a game between treatments and it was fine! I never stayed in the house even when I knew my counts were the lowest. But I was more careful--washed my hands more, sanitized surfaces, etc. but I tried to do things to get me through it.

      5 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Going for first chemo treatment today. Anything special I should know, take or be concerned with?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi I took some juice and a book with me. However, I didn't drink the juice nor did I read. I was a bit nervous at first, then when I met my treatment nurse I totally relaxed. She covered me with a warm blanket and explain everything she was going to do. There were many other ppl getting chemo and...

      more

      Hi I took some juice and a book with me. However, I didn't drink the juice nor did I read. I was a bit nervous at first, then when I met my treatment nurse I totally relaxed. She covered me with a warm blanket and explain everything she was going to do. There were many other ppl getting chemo and they were talking and laughing with each other. It all seemed so normal and wasn't what I had pictured. It made me feel positive and not alone. Now when I go I usually have some crossword puzzles, a book and a memory game with me. After I'm there I just choose what I want to do. My center has water, coffee and many other edibles

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Like my oncologist told me.... "This isn't your mother's chemotherapy." There have been improvements... lots. I agree with Jayme about the commraderie in the infusion room. Lots of talking, laughing, and eating. It was never a scene of grim silence but a feeling of "we are all in this...

      more

      Like my oncologist told me.... "This isn't your mother's chemotherapy." There have been improvements... lots. I agree with Jayme about the commraderie in the infusion room. Lots of talking, laughing, and eating. It was never a scene of grim silence but a feeling of "we are all in this together." I would bring a book to read, or if you knit, or some kind of puzzle... just as Jayme suggested. I would usually fall asleep through some of the treatment. I found the experience to be never unpleasent. I know that sounds very odd but lots of us would wear very funny hats, lots of joke telling and plans for the future. It was a place of hope, help, and support. Much luck to you and march through this like you own it! Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How long after chemo is started does it take to lose eyebrows and lashes?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I had 4 rounds of AC each 3 weeks apart. After the last treatment, I noticed my eyebrows were starting to get thinner and the same with eyelashes. I never had enough chemo to lose them totally.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I lost my hair first about 15 days after my first treatment. Then it was several more weeks before my eyebrows & eyelashes came out. :)

      Comment
  • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile

    Hi my lovely sisters, had my lumpectomy and didn't have clear margins so going back to surgery in Jan. I just want to thank you all for being hear because I know some of you have gone thru the same thing, which is why I didn't loose it when I heard.

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_4 Patient
    over 5 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • frances pensato Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just hang in there . You will be fine. There have been man that have to go through a second surgery but happy with the results at the end. We are all here for you and sending you lots of strength.

      Comment
    • Cheryl Wornham Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sorry you have to go through another surgery prayers coming your way

      Comment
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