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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Francine Williams Profile

    Can anyone tell me if sores in the mouth are side effects from chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • R. SUTHERLAND Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Pink magic works bs

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, that is one of the side effects. Dry mouth and sores. Like Karen said....there's a mouthwash for that. Just ask your doc.

      Comment
  • Sharon Danielson Profile

    Read about this and wanted to share it regarding chemo-hair-losshttp://www.msc-worldwide.com/

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    over 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hey Sharon...great idea posting this!! I'd read of women using the cold cap & they swore by it. They didn't lose much of their hair. Some said that didn't lose any! It's worth checking into !!!!

      Comment
    • Kim Amelio Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      My mom actually asked about this and was told by her oncologist that wearing cold caps may actually prevent the chemo from going to that area.. So I guess if it were me.. I'd rather be bald and not worry about the cancer going to my brain - just my opnion

      5 comments
  • P C Profile

    Has anyone had a senoma form after surgery? How long does it continue to swell? (they drained it for me once)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I developed a seroma quickly after surgery. I continued to feel pressure in the surgical scar. A few months after surgery I there was a visible swelling in the scare. I had an ultrasound that found the seroma. I then raised it with my Breast Surgeon who explained around 40% of women ended up with...

      more

      I developed a seroma quickly after surgery. I continued to feel pressure in the surgical scar. A few months after surgery I there was a visible swelling in the scare. I had an ultrasound that found the seroma. I then raised it with my Breast Surgeon who explained around 40% of women ended up with seromas - a pertinent medical fact I thought should have been mentioned prior to surgery but about which I will not make a fuss because he did a great job. The seroma was most uncomfortable around six months after surgery. I am 16 months post surgery now and it is uncomfortable occasionally only. I suspect this is hormonally and fluid dependent. I am normally not brilliant at healing after getting a cut, scratch etc so I have been pleasantly surprised at how little trouble the seroma is these days. I was offered a needle aspiration by my GP around the time the seroma was at its most intense however he warned me that having the fluid drawn out can make some seromas fill faster and bigger, so making it worse and also said any needle into flesh carries a risk of infection into my surgical scar. He felt most seromas spontaneously regress of their own accord especially those like mine that are not toughly encapsulated. Weighing up the pros and cons I elected not to aspirate.It has been shrinking away to almost nothing these past 6 months. I'm therefore glad I left it alone. My seroma was classified as small. If it was a large one and more incapacitating I may have made a different decision.

      2 comments
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a small seroma that would swell and reduce over and over again. I finally had my surgeon aspirate the fluid out once and that seemed to help the pocket heal and close up. Depending on how large yours is, you may be able to have the same done for you.

      1 comment
  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mom was recently told she was in stage 2 of breast cancer - I'm really scared and want to know how bad is stage 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Its going to be okay. I am a survivor that was diagnosed with stage 3c. I have completed surgery, chemo and radiation. My cancer also went into my lymph nodes. I'm praying for you and your mom.

      1 comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast...

      more

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast cancer or your mom is younger than 40, you might talk to your doctor (&/or hers) about genetic testing. They have identified gene mutations that drastically increase your risk of breast & ovarian cancer. I don't mean to freak you out or imply that anyone in your family has one of these gene mutations, I am merely passing on information that might prove helpful.

      Like Diana, I recommend your mom get in touch with other women who have or have survived breast cancer. She may meet some during treatment or you can help her search for a local support group.

      And at 10 weeks pregnant, your mom has plenty of time to enjoy your pregnancy! If she begins chemo treatments or undergoes surgery soon, I'm sure just thinking about you & that little one will lift her spirits & help her fight. You ladies can get through this! I'll keep you all in my most positive of thoughts.
      Sending Love!

      1 comment
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