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Linnea's Story

About her story

"I decided that chemo was going to be my friend and that it was going to save me."

In April of 2001, Linnea was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer. Her treatment regimen included chemotherapy and radiation, but she soon discovered that her best medicine was a motherly instinct to survive.

In this poignant video, Linnea talks about how her 10 year old daughter gave her the strength and motivation to move beyond the shock of breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone flown with a wig? Has it been an issue with security?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Libby B Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mother and I are on vacation now in Las Vegas and she had no trouble at all at the airport.

      Comment
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I haven't but they shouldn't even care . Women have fake hair pieces all the time . I wouldn't worry one bit . Have fun on your trip .

      Comment
  • Sam Perez Profile

    What are the effects of radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Your doctor and nurse would be the best people to speak with about side effects as side effects vary from person to person and depend on the radiation dose and what part(s) of the body are being treated. Sometimes, your overall health will affect how your body reacts to radiation treatment. ...

      more

      Your doctor and nurse would be the best people to speak with about side effects as side effects vary from person to person and depend on the radiation dose and what part(s) of the body are being treated. Sometimes, your overall health will affect how your body reacts to radiation treatment. Some of the most common side effects include, but may not be limited to: fatigue and weakness, reddening of the skin of the treated area, breast discomfort or pain, and swelling of the breast or arm on treated side.

      There are some ways to take special care of yourself during treatment that may reduce side effects:

      1. Get plenty of rest
      2. Eat a balanced, nutritious diet
      3. Take care of the skin in the treatment area
      4. Do not wear tight clothes over the treatment area
      5. Do not rub, scrub, or use adhesive tape on treated skin
      6. Do not put heat or cold (heating pad, heat lamp, ice pack) on the treatment area
      7. Protect the treated area from the sun
      8. Tell your doctor about ALL medicines you are taking (including vitamins, herbs, aspirin, etc.)

      Take care!

      1 comment
    • Eleanor Johnson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The only effect i received from radiation was just the darken of my skin. I did not experience the tiredness that most patients do.

      Comment
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
  • kim sosa Profile

    I received my cocktail of chemo I will be taking Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide & Paclitaxel. Has anyone been on any of these and what should I expect? I start next Wed. Excited to start my journey and kill this bc and be normal and healthy again.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 1 answer
    • shen cruces Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Hi Kim, I am currently on AC and will be following it up with taxol also. I have only had two treatments so far and they have been spaces two weeks apart so I get to have the neupogen shot too. So far I am tired the day of chemo but I drink lots of fluids, not just water, to flush my system. ...

      more

      Hi Kim, I am currently on AC and will be following it up with taxol also. I have only had two treatments so far and they have been spaces two weeks apart so I get to have the neupogen shot too. So far I am tired the day of chemo but I drink lots of fluids, not just water, to flush my system. The next day is okay, then I am tired for the next 3-4 days. I keep on the schedule for the nausea meds which work well for me. I was told not to get behind on taking them. I eat lots of protein, fruit, and really anything that sounds remotely appetizing. Everyone's body is different so you might have less or more side effects. Hopefully less. I do visualize the chemo drugs doing their job (I picture PacMan chasing down all the cancer cells). It helps to feel confident that these drugs are helping us get back to our lives. You may be nervous the first day. Just make sure you drink lots of water starting the day before chemo and stock your fridge with things you like to eat. I had some heartburn issues after chemo so I always have foods that are easily digestible ready for me to grab. Best of luck to you. You and the chemo are going to kick some cancer butt on Wednesday!

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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