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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • gina richardson Profile

    How long does a chemo treatment usually take?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Maria Torstensson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I have received Taxotere and the infusion takes 1h. From arrival until departure max 2h. Wish you good luck! 

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My first infusian took the longest. It took about 3 to 3 1/2 hours once I was "hooked up." I always had a blood test to make sure my numbers were good enough to get the chemo and just some normal wait time. I always planned on it taking 6 hours total and thrilled when it was less.

      Comment
  • Lou Cam Profile

    All of my doctors are together as a team, surgeons, oncologists, radiologists. I am not getting the info & discussions that you all seem to from my oncologist PA. Don't want to be "difficult", but afraid to make mistake in treatment

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Mary Chase Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Lou, if you're not getting the answers you need or the explanations you need then its time to be the patient that asks a a lot of questions. Your care team should not get irritated by this. This is your body and your life and if you need to remind them of that then do so! Write down all of your...

      more

      Lou, if you're not getting the answers you need or the explanations you need then its time to be the patient that asks a a lot of questions. Your care team should not get irritated by this. This is your body and your life and if you need to remind them of that then do so! Write down all of your questions and tell your team you need answers. You are not being difficult you are being your own advocate. If you still don't get the answers you need or are comfortable with then its time for a second opinion.

      1 comment
    • elma p. Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I know what you mean. It seems that I was not getting specific info unless I asked for it. Example: onc saying no chemo, but I had to ask what the oncotype test number was. Felt I would not get that unless I asked. Surgeon is similar. Don't think it is that they don't want to say, but do not...

      more

      I know what you mean. It seems that I was not getting specific info unless I asked for it. Example: onc saying no chemo, but I had to ask what the oncotype test number was. Felt I would not get that unless I asked. Surgeon is similar. Don't think it is that they don't want to say, but do not want to overwhelm those who cannot handle the info. This site has been my resource to know what no to ask! Keep asking for yourself!

      Comment
  • Lou Cam Profile

    Some people on this site say , "I read your story". How do you do that ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      You click on the name some ppl have there story.

      2 comments
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      U can go to ur profile at home page on top left hand corner of the app...then u go to account settings and u put ur story there.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Any thoughts? I saw two Medical Oncologists. One said 4 rounds of TC, but if I'm BRCA positive, 20 weeks of ACT. 2nd Onc said 16 weeks of ACT no matter what.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      16 or 20 weeks but how many treatments? (I'm having 6 rounds but 3 weeks apart so 16 weeks..)

      Comment
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