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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • John Johnston Profile
  • Thumb avatar default

    My eyebrows and eyelashes have thinned out considerably two months post chemo. I kept them all through chemo even though I lost all my hair. Has anyone else had this happen? How long before they grow back?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • maria stuccio Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Same thing happened to me. I'm 3 months post and they haven't come back. I thought it might be due to starting tamoxifen. I really miss my eyelashes!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      LoL yes isn't it, but we got through it, now we just have to deal with the rehab of it all!

      Comment
  • Casey Chernes Profile

    Just finished 6 rounds of ACT treatments and going to start taxol for the next treatments. Had alot of nausea with ACT but the dr said taxol is easier. Anyone currently doing taxol?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Casey, taxol was easier on me than A/C. I had four dose dense treatments. I didn't have the nausea. And the fatigue was a little better. My nails didn't turn black but the flattened out. Also my hair began to grow back about the same time as my last treatment. I had my mastectomy in Oct and...

      more

      Hi Casey, taxol was easier on me than A/C. I had four dose dense treatments. I didn't have the nausea. And the fatigue was a little better. My nails didn't turn black but the flattened out. Also my hair began to grow back about the same time as my last treatment. I had my mastectomy in Oct and unfortunately had to begin chemo again with two different drugs. Best wishes to you and hang in there!!

      4 comments
    • Carly Byrd Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I just finished 12 rounds of Taxol. The fatigue lightened but there are other side effects like blackening nails. I have Herceptin every 3 weeks through next August and have already had a double mastectomy with a previous diagnosis. I am 29.

      6 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone had or received chemo in 6 weeks in order to avoid loosing hair? (versus a 4 week cycle)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      DOn't think it matters much. Your hair will still come out. Once I finally understood it, I didn't mind it so much. Chemo attacks rapidly dividing cells and destroys them. Therefore cancer is destroyed (hopefully) because it's composed of rapidly dividing cells. The hair on your head is the...

      more

      DOn't think it matters much. Your hair will still come out. Once I finally understood it, I didn't mind it so much. Chemo attacks rapidly dividing cells and destroys them. Therefore cancer is destroyed (hopefully) because it's composed of rapidly dividing cells. The hair on your head is the most rapidly growing hair on your body which is why it falls out first and completely. Eyebrows and eyelashes take longer and sometimes don't fall out entirely...hair on the rest of your body may never fall out. Anyway, it's unavoidable and I think it's a sign that the chemo is doing what it needs to. Most of us here feel that once it's gone it's not such a big deal. It's actually sort of liberating!!!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I haven't heard of it. I lost my hair after the first treatment. My reservation would be the fear that altering the regular frequency of treatment just to try to save my hair might come back to bite me in the future. Will the chemotherapy be as effective with the administration of it in this...

      more

      I haven't heard of it. I lost my hair after the first treatment. My reservation would be the fear that altering the regular frequency of treatment just to try to save my hair might come back to bite me in the future. Will the chemotherapy be as effective with the administration of it in this unorthodox way? It is traumatic to lose your hair but would my vanity win out over the wisdom of standard treatment? (HECK NO!) Breast cancer is a formidable enemy and it plays sneaky and tough. Being bald is temporary, there are many ways to deal with it.... wigs, scarves, hats, or even "going commando." I wouldn't chance it. As Traciann says... "It's the drug." Sharon

      Comment
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