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Bonnie's Story

About her story

"There's some things in life you have to share. You have to have someone to lean on, and they'll help you get through."

After performing a self-breast exam, Bonnie Brooks discovered a lump and immediately scheduled an appointment with her doctor. On September 11, 2008, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 metastatic breast cancer. With a difficult treatment regiment ahead, including chemotherapy, she realized that she could not face breast cancer alone.

"I was always very independent and I've learned with breast cancer you can't always be independent," says Brooks. "You have to be dependent on people to help you through."

Hear Bonnie's inspirational story and learn more about how she overcame breast cancer.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the general prognosis for stage one triple negative breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 2 answers
    • Trish Watt Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed with stage one triple negative Breast cancer in 2005. They didn't know much about it back then other than it being an aggressive type of cancer that they usually went at with strong Chemo. A/C and Taxol dose dense which means Chemo every other week for 8 rounds of treatment. I was...

      more

      I was diagnosed with stage one triple negative Breast cancer in 2005. They didn't know much about it back then other than it being an aggressive type of cancer that they usually went at with strong Chemo. A/C and Taxol dose dense which means Chemo every other week for 8 rounds of treatment. I was treated at Rush Medical Center in Chicago, I don't know where you live but if it's near a big city go to a teaching hospital, they have all the latest treatments. I'm doing great and with all of the anti-nausea drugs they have now I was fortunate NOT to get sick even once but everyone responds differently. To their treatments. Now days they have found that treating Cancer is very specific for each person and they treat you for your needs not based on someone else's response. You are going down a long road of treatment but you will get through. This is a great site to get answers, they didn't even have it 6 years ago so see they are making progress. Stay positive, you are woman, hear us ROAR!

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Your prognosis is excellent. I would encourage you to do everything your doctors tell and take excellent care of yourself like eat right and get plenty of sleep. In going through cancer treatment, I realized God loves me and will help me through this. God loves you and will help you too.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone else had this problem? I had a bilateral mastectomy w/ expanders on the 17th. 5 days later I had another because the incision wasn't closing properly. I'm facing another because there is a small spot that is not closing!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lisa Taylor Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I will be praying for you and your family! God Bless

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Sometimes when you have radiation prior to reconstruction there is a problem with the incision healing due to the radiated dead skin cells. A skin graft maybe required. Talk to your plastic surgeon and ask what your options are. Take care

      Comment
  • Danielle Moore Profile

    I've been diagnosed with LCIS after breast reduction surgery. I'm so confused about this and I have to wait weeks to see a doctor. Do I have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 1 answer
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I did some research and it is lobular carcinoma in situ. From what I read, it is not cancer but abnormal cells in the lobules that increases the risk for developing cancer in the future. Not everyone develops cancer. It is found accidentally when doing some other procedure. I would call my doctor...

      more

      I did some research and it is lobular carcinoma in situ. From what I read, it is not cancer but abnormal cells in the lobules that increases the risk for developing cancer in the future. Not everyone develops cancer. It is found accidentally when doing some other procedure. I would call my doctor and ask him/her to explain it to you

      4 comments
  • Sarah Hailes Profile

    I have burning pain on the side I had my lymphectomy. I am several months post op and three weeks post chemo. Is this normal? I just assumed it was and never asked. Now I'm wondering if I'm wrong.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sarah,
      I agree with Norma, call your doctor to check this out.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Scar tissue can be tight and burn. Nerves heal and find new paths. It is imperative to stretch and keep the muscles supple. I skipped a month and am having to stretch out again. If you're worried call the doctor.

      Comment

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