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Common Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the prognosis of stage 3 medullary carcinoma? Ten years ago I had a lumpectomy and radiation. Now I have tumors in both breasts and face a bilateral radical mastectomy plus chemo. What is my prognosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When I was going through cancer treatment, I refused to hear negative stories. It didn't do me any good and just depressed me. There are many more women alive today because of the treatments available. No human can really talk prognosis with any amount of certainty because we don't have a...

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      When I was going through cancer treatment, I refused to hear negative stories. It didn't do me any good and just depressed me. There are many more women alive today because of the treatments available. No human can really talk prognosis with any amount of certainty because we don't have a clue. If I were you, I would not focus on your diagnosis but on your fight that is ahead of you. Here is Marianne, who has fought a huge battle and won. There are many, many women on this board who have made it and are alive and well today. We are all here to support you. We know this is the scary thing to be facing but we have all been there. We know that terror but also know success. Please don't spend time and energy looking at that half empty glass.... you might at well believe you are going conquer this and win the battle. Do not put a limit on your life by talking prognosis because in reality, it doesn't help you.... it drags you down both mentally and physically. Who actually knows what YOUR prognosis will be?Prognosis, is a cold, analytical statistic.... you are a warm, loving, living, breathing, feeling, human being. Only God knows how long any of us have on this earth. Your job right now is to fight like a girl, get through your treatment and start living your wonderful life. Again, we are all here to support you and share our experiences with you. God's blessings to you. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The minute that I was diagnosed I made the decision to have a bilateral mastectomy and it was the best decision I have made. I will soon have my implant exchange.

      Comment
  • Sandy MacDonald Profile

    Has anyone used Biotin for hair growth after chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yes, I take a pill everyday. I also use Nioxon shampoo and I am pleased with how fast my hair is growing back. I believe in it. Good luck.

      Comment
    • Cathy Wadkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Take 5000 mg from Walmarts and have a salon put a protein treatment in every 6 weeks and get your salon to buy the Bosley shampoo, conditioner, the 3 rd and the 4 th step as well I have nee

      Comment
  • kate eshleman Profile

    I had my drains removed Friday and understood some fluid under my mastectomy scars would be typical, but I actually look like I have small breasts again and it is uncomfortable. Is this typical?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Kate I had fluid build up post bilateral mastectomies my surgeon would manually drain the fluid with a syringe every other day for two weeks after my surgeries. I noticed the more I did with my arms the faster the bluish would build up. Also needed to sleep ony back propped up with pillows or in...

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      Kate I had fluid build up post bilateral mastectomies my surgeon would manually drain the fluid with a syringe every other day for two weeks after my surgeries. I noticed the more I did with my arms the faster the bluish would build up. Also needed to sleep ony back propped up with pillows or in a lazy boy recliner laying flat or on my side would also cause fluid buildup. In time the fluid build up will stop and reabsorb. Most important is if the areas is red and warm to touch or if you have a fever go to the emergency room as that could be a sign of infection take care

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Hi I had fluid build up for a year after surgery. I still have a little but nowhere near as much as the first year. It is fairly typical. I always showed my oncologist and surgeon anything that bothered me, just to be safe. Not sure what can be done although I did have lymphatic drainage...

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      Hi I had fluid build up for a year after surgery. I still have a little but nowhere near as much as the first year. It is fairly typical. I always showed my oncologist and surgeon anything that bothered me, just to be safe. Not sure what can be done although I did have lymphatic drainage treatments done by a licensed person.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does anyone have advice? I'm starting 12 weeks of taxol/herceptin weekly. Then nine months of herceptin every 3 weeks. I'm scared as heck.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I was very scared also. I did 5 treatments of taxotere,carboplatin n herceptin n then 9months of herceptin. For me,the chemo kicked my butt, I didn't do well. But it was over before I knew and now I am totally fine. You will get through it, try to stay hydrated before n after your treatments....

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      I was very scared also. I did 5 treatments of taxotere,carboplatin n herceptin n then 9months of herceptin. For me,the chemo kicked my butt, I didn't do well. But it was over before I knew and now I am totally fine. You will get through it, try to stay hydrated before n after your treatments. Make sure you let your oncologist know of any side effects. There's many drugs to alleviate bothersome symptoms.

      1 comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I've had over a year of treatment so far and only 3 Herceptin left. I started scared too!!! Walking, yoga and especially meditation have been invaluable. Having a support network, asking for help when you need it, praying to whomever you believe in, cuddling pets, Netflix movies, audiobooks all...

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      I've had over a year of treatment so far and only 3 Herceptin left. I started scared too!!! Walking, yoga and especially meditation have been invaluable. Having a support network, asking for help when you need it, praying to whomever you believe in, cuddling pets, Netflix movies, audiobooks all help. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other and your medical team will help you through any issues. Her2 is now an ok one to have - at least we have Herceptin and a bunch if new treatments in studies now too.

      1 comment
  • Deborah St. Aubin Profile

    I am four months post chemo and my hair seems to be growing back so slow, about I/2 inch and slightly longer in the back is this normal? Before Breast Cancer and Chemo my grew really fast , now I am scared it May never grow as before.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Deborah,
      Not to worry!!! I, too, had the fast growing hair but after chemo, that initial growth seemed to take 8 months. It will grow, and it will go back to the way it was growing. Be patient, it will come back, it just takes awhile. Hang in there, Sharon

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Oh please don't worry it takes a long time, mine grew slowly the first year, really slow.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is it ok to have alcohol while on Tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The answer better be yes or I'm screwed. I'm a home brewer and just tried my hand a wine making for the first time. I do know for a fact a double shot of scotch makes shaving your head the first much easier.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes it is fine to have alcohol while on tamoxifen and also while having chemo. My doc said try to keep your life as normal as possible, if you want to have a drink, have it. Sit back, have a drink and relax. Good luck.

      Comment
  • sabrina brown Profile

    Last chemo tomorrow. How long before my hair will start to grow back in?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    over 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had ended chemo Oct 27th, 2011. Peach fuzz really starting 2weeks after. By Christmas time it was probably 1/2 inch. Now-almost 6months out I have a pixie style-probably a little over an inch long. Looking back at Christmas, end of Jan, I thought I had so much hair at that time....now it just...

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      I had ended chemo Oct 27th, 2011. Peach fuzz really starting 2weeks after. By Christmas time it was probably 1/2 inch. Now-almost 6months out I have a pixie style-probably a little over an inch long. Looking back at Christmas, end of Jan, I thought I had so much hair at that time....now it just keeps getting longer! I used Nioxin shampoo and took biotin daily. When I was loosing my hair and it was only about an inch long after having my husband clip it, i was so sad that it was so short. After chemo and all I have been through and it is an inch long-I am so happy. Funny how that is huh. It is a thing we have to go through-I am thankful for things much more now!

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I went through chemo twice. My chemo with Adriamycin/Cytoxin & Taxol I began growing my hair back before my last dose of Taxol. Then it just began growing like crazy! Congrads on your completing chemo!!! It's a huge achievement!!

      1 comment
  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mom was recently told she was in stage 2 of breast cancer - I'm really scared and want to know how bad is stage 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Its going to be okay. I am a survivor that was diagnosed with stage 3c. I have completed surgery, chemo and radiation. My cancer also went into my lymph nodes. I'm praying for you and your mom.

      1 comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast...

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      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast cancer or your mom is younger than 40, you might talk to your doctor (&/or hers) about genetic testing. They have identified gene mutations that drastically increase your risk of breast & ovarian cancer. I don't mean to freak you out or imply that anyone in your family has one of these gene mutations, I am merely passing on information that might prove helpful.

      Like Diana, I recommend your mom get in touch with other women who have or have survived breast cancer. She may meet some during treatment or you can help her search for a local support group.

      And at 10 weeks pregnant, your mom has plenty of time to enjoy your pregnancy! If she begins chemo treatments or undergoes surgery soon, I'm sure just thinking about you & that little one will lift her spirits & help her fight. You ladies can get through this! I'll keep you all in my most positive of thoughts.
      Sending Love!

      1 comment
  • Rachael Leslie Profile

    My girlfriend was diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday. The appointment with the surgeon is next week to get specific answers. I want to do anything and everything I can to help her through this. Any advice is very much needed and appreciated!

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your...

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      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your support. Go with her to her appointments.... the diagnostic ones will be particularly important. She will need someone to --take notes-- as she will never be able to remember most of what is being said. This is a step by step process. Try to keep her from going to the really dark side. There are a ton of positive stories and outcomes to this lousy diagnosis. We, here, are living proof. Some of the journey's have been very tough but these strong women are here to share their struggles and outcomes. You are a dear friend to want to help her through this battle. Please stay in touch with us, we are here to help you and her along her path. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because...

      more

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because when you are with the doctor we patients go blank I don't know how many times I was going to ask this that or the other thing and get into the office and I go blank my husband would just chime in for me Be patient with your girlfriend she will be on a whirlwind of emotions. Hold her tell her it's okay to talk about it all with you let her know your feelings also. My husband and I held each other up luckily one was always stronger then the other on those bad days. I have a link on my profile to my story of my personal experience with breast cancer in 2003. I take you from the initial diagnosis the biopsy surgery and recovery with a reflection a year later. Even though my type of breast cancer or choice of treatment may be different I hope by sharing my experience it will help other women and there family. http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Breast lumps on both breasts, sized 3cm, 2.8 0.8 & 0.5 on the ultrasound. I also have a family history of breast cancer - my dad's Aunt. It increases my risk that it's breast cancer. What should I do?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You should go to your doctor immediately. Early detection makes a big difference.

      Comment
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I found the tumor in my left breast 2 years ago, at 42 y.o. Same week I did the ultrasound - we jump the step of mammogram because it was clear where the thing was. With the ultrasound we found 2 more tumors, and the confirmation of being a mass. One more week I had the biopsy. Then surgery - I...

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      I found the tumor in my left breast 2 years ago, at 42 y.o. Same week I did the ultrasound - we jump the step of mammogram because it was clear where the thing was. With the ultrasound we found 2 more tumors, and the confirmation of being a mass. One more week I had the biopsy. Then surgery - I opt for double mastectomy because I had a high risk over 60% to have in the other breast in the future. Best thing I did because in the biopsy post surgery, they did find a tinny tumor on my right breast, still not detectable by any test.
      Started chemo 1 month after surgery. Then had the genetic test done, and I'm BRCA 2 positive - high risk for ovarian cancer. As soon as I finished the chemo, I had a surgery to remove the ovaries. Then did reconstruction, and now I am healthy, happy and with really little risk of reincidence! Easy? No, it was a trip to hell, painful, scary, I still have neuropathy, joint pains and chemo brain. But I wouldn't change any of the steps I took because I'm alive and happy, very happy!!!! My conclusion and answer for you: don't waste time. As soon as you can have the alien removed from your body, better chances for everything to be all right!!

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have a recent lump at my areola, it feels hard and downy move much. I've had so "weird" feeling in tho breast over some months possibly years. Would cancer just "pop" up

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Absolutely have this checked. My breast where breast cancer was found felt "weird." This is NOT to say you have breast cancer at all. For your own peace of mind have this checked. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Cancer can be sneaky...have it checked out soon. I couldn't even feel my cancer and it was found on a mammogram. Keep us updated and prayers for you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was Reading my post operative pathology report and found out I jumped from grade 2 to grade 3. Feeling like it's no longer curable. How do you cope?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 6 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I understand hoe you're feeling. I was diagnosed last year at 49 with stage 3C breast cancer. I was scared beyond belief. The cancer was also in my chest wall and 13 lymph nodes with some breaking outside the node. Went through 8 rounds of chemo then a bilateral mastectomy. They discovered that...

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      I understand hoe you're feeling. I was diagnosed last year at 49 with stage 3C breast cancer. I was scared beyond belief. The cancer was also in my chest wall and 13 lymph nodes with some breaking outside the node. Went through 8 rounds of chemo then a bilateral mastectomy. They discovered that chemo hadn't helped as much as they thought. So....I switched chemo drugs and had 8 more 3 weeks after my surgery. Then 33 radiation treatments. I'm on tamoxifen now and I'm happy to say I'm in remission!!! It wasn't easy. You just take it one day at a time. If that's too much....one hour at time. You'll get to the other side of all this. And we're cheering you on.....every step of the way!!!!!!

      2 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I, too, had a disappointment in my post-op pathology report. After hearing from my surgeon right after my surgery that all 5 sentinel nodes were clear.... one came back positive in the pathology report. I know how you feel, as it is a huge let-down and you MOMENTARILY watch your life pass...

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      I, too, had a disappointment in my post-op pathology report. After hearing from my surgeon right after my surgery that all 5 sentinel nodes were clear.... one came back positive in the pathology report. I know how you feel, as it is a huge let-down and you MOMENTARILY watch your life pass before your eyes. You just get back up on the pony and keep on riding! The shock of this will pass.... you will get better, you will get well, you will be ok. You got through your treatment, and charge ahead with your life. This is just a piece of the puzzle of your disease. This is not charting your course of life. There are a vast majority of us who are alive and well years after beating breast cancer. You just work on being one of us. I swear a positive attitude will do more for you than 50 gallons of tears you could cry over this small fact. You reaction should be.... SO WHAT! Kick booty darlin' do not let this get you down. Fight like a girl and you will be a winner.
      Hang in there, much love and strength, take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Jessi Thompson Profile

    Can fibroglandular tissue that gets hard become dangerous in the future?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Jesse,

      In an overall picture, you have dense breast tissue. They are still deciding whether this predisposes a woman to breast cancer. What it does do is make it much more difficult to get a good, clear mammogram shot. This was my problem.... dense breast tissue which was very difficult to...

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      Jesse,

      In an overall picture, you have dense breast tissue. They are still deciding whether this predisposes a woman to breast cancer. What it does do is make it much more difficult to get a good, clear mammogram shot. This was my problem.... dense breast tissue which was very difficult to see through. I ended up with breast cancer that was not diagnosed by mammogram. If there is a question as to whether a lump is malignant or not, I would push my doctor to order additional testing such as an MRI or biopsy, etc. If I would have jumped up and down on the radiologist's chest, I would have been diagnosed at an earlier stage. Sometimes in life, you have to "take the bull by the horns" and be your own best advocate and insist on further testing. You could be saving your life. Put on those big girl panties and really talk to your doctor about the ramifications of dense breast tissue. It can be a real problem. You are right to question this! Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Jessi Thompson Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      I went to get a Breast Ultrasound on Wednesday and they said the hard lump in my left breast was fibroglandular tissue. I am most likely in perimenopause. But have a family history of breast cancer and my mom is currently fighting a 4 year battle with Rectal cancer. So my question is, can the...

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      I went to get a Breast Ultrasound on Wednesday and they said the hard lump in my left breast was fibroglandular tissue. I am most likely in perimenopause. But have a family history of breast cancer and my mom is currently fighting a 4 year battle with Rectal cancer. So my question is, can the fibroglandular tissue turn into cancer or something I need to worry about? I am waiting to hear from a doctor (which could take a while) to see if they recommend to observe the fibroglandular tissue lump or have surgery on it. I'm just not very informed on what fibroglandular tissue is and what can happen with it.

      Comment
  • sheree oden Profile

    Has anyone had a recurrence in a previous mastectomy ? An identical tumor came back 10!yrs later in the tissue surrounding an implant where my left breast had been. Next week I will have a re mastectomy, followed by radiation and more chemo.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Lisa S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Recently diagnosed in my lymph nodes on my chest wall as well as many lymph nodes regionally after mastectomy chemo radiation and hormonal therapy. First dx 1/2010 this time 2/2012. Prayers and hugs going your way. Keep in touch.

      1 comment
    • Lisa S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Recently diagnosed in my lymph nodes on my chest wall as well as many lymph nodes regionally after mastectomy chemo radiation and hormonal therapy. First dx 1/2010 this time 2/2012. Prayers and hugs going your way. Keep in touch.

      Comment
  • Kendra Klindt Profile

    Tomorrow is my 1st of 4 chemo treatments. Getting Cytoxan and Taxotere! Taking steroid pills today - dexamethasone. Have my 3 kinds of nausea meds ready to go for after chemo. Any thoughts or suggestions? I know I can/will do this but scared to death!

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_1 Patient
    over 4 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Great attitude! Yes you can do this! Drink lots of water. Rest when needed, but walking helps too. Take your meds before you need them. Easier to treat then to take away. Use plastic ware to help with the metal taste. Eat what you want. It's all trial and error. What is good one day may not be...

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      Great attitude! Yes you can do this! Drink lots of water. Rest when needed, but walking helps too. Take your meds before you need them. Easier to treat then to take away. Use plastic ware to help with the metal taste. Eat what you want. It's all trial and error. What is good one day may not be the next. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Mimi Carroll Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Drunk lots if fluid today... And keep drinking to flush it out.... Most of the time T/C is not the scary combination. I wish you well. Remember to have infusion nurses number posted at home in case you have questions.

      Comment
  • Linda Wells Profile

    What is necrosis of the breast? I have had SEVERAL mammograms done and 2 biopsies on my left breast and the necrosis didnt show up until I had a sonogram. I have had pain in my left breast continually and I cannot hold a book or my grandchild against it.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 1 answer
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Necrosis is tissue - such as breast fat - where damage to the cells has occurred. Necrotic is a Greek derivation and it means death. So in medical usage it refers to prematurely dead tissue when the host body remains alive. The thing is the dead tissue in a live organism can arise from a...

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      Necrosis is tissue - such as breast fat - where damage to the cells has occurred. Necrotic is a Greek derivation and it means death. So in medical usage it refers to prematurely dead tissue when the host body remains alive. The thing is the dead tissue in a live organism can arise from a multitude of causes. It can be a blow to the area, radiation can do this - even the bite from a white spider can cause tissue death. So if you have a breast histopathology report stating after a biopsy that they found necrotic cells within a tumour positive for breast cancer, this means there were dead cells in the tumour site. In a normal breast, if necrosis is present it normally does not mean breast cancer as it can happen from so many things. A friend had this from a grandchild accidentally kicking her hard in the chest for example. The question to ask is - is your necrosis associated with breast cancer or some other condition.

      4 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone having lower back pain while on tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    almost 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • R. SUTHERLAND Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3A Patient

      Yes!!

      Comment
    • Sandra Dakin Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes. I am having an MRI next week to rule out disk issues. My Onco however did not think there was a correlation.

      1 comment
  • Betsy Krueger Profile

    What is a good cream for a mastectomy scar?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alison Johnson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I like eucerine, it's at most pharmacies. 2 year after treatment and I still use it each night.

      2 comments
    • Betsy Krueger Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the...

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      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the surgeries, but the scar tissue on each side of scars no longer looks so reddish and painful. I think, too, that the rubbing I did. It helped me not think it was weird and ugly, and it has helped me not feel so regretful that all the cancer occurred. Maybe that's part of "touch."

      Thank, again. This thread does get read by others, so I think it's valuable to continue to have suggestions.

      Comment
  • Deb  Liebzeit Profile

    PORTA-CATH PAIN. My PORTA-CATH was inserted 2 days ago and I have to say it actually hurts worse than my mastectomy. Anyone else experienced this? Cripes this is some damn ride I am on! ;-)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 5 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I'm 2 years out. I hated the port every minute of every day that I had it. I hated the way it looked, the way it felt, and what it represented. I was, by the onc, told to keep it in at least 1 month after my last chemo. I jad mine out 1 month and 1 day after my last chemo. BUT, with time and...

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      I'm 2 years out. I hated the port every minute of every day that I had it. I hated the way it looked, the way it felt, and what it represented. I was, by the onc, told to keep it in at least 1 month after my last chemo. I jad mine out 1 month and 1 day after my last chemo. BUT, with time and distance it was the best thing I did for me and my treatment AND taking it OUT it put an !!!!!! to the end of chemo. I not only survived I won, and you will to. I chose to put 2 rose buds and a pink ribbion tattoo over my scar. It is my own personal badge of honor. God Bless your journey.

      Comment
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      My port surg too was more difficult than the double mass. Like Sarah said it was short lived discomfort, as the pros out weighed the cons. Got mine put in oct 2009 and it still remains in. I have been so blessed and not had any further problems with it since in the beginning. Good luck. N god...

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      My port surg too was more difficult than the double mass. Like Sarah said it was short lived discomfort, as the pros out weighed the cons. Got mine put in oct 2009 and it still remains in. I have been so blessed and not had any further problems with it since in the beginning. Good luck. N god bless.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I'm 23 year old. I have a lump in the upper outer quadrant of my right breast. I had it biopsied 5 months before... it's stage 2. I sometimes feel pain in that area not very often. Does it mean it has metastasized??

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Connie Demarest Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      GET TREATMENT RIGHT AWAY!!!!!!!!

      2 comments
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would ask your doctor to be sure nothing has changed. Have you had surgery, chemo or radiation?

      5 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anybody Dx with stage 2A with Negative Nodes, Had To Do Any chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on what is contained on a cellular level. What type of breast cancer, stage, grade, onco DX. Her2+ ER- PR- ? Lots of findings go into the decision for your treatment. It isn't just because it is a 2A. That is only part of it. You are still in the discovery-phase of your diagnosis. ...

      more

      It depends on what is contained on a cellular level. What type of breast cancer, stage, grade, onco DX. Her2+ ER- PR- ? Lots of findings go into the decision for your treatment. It isn't just because it is a 2A. That is only part of it. You are still in the discovery-phase of your diagnosis. Once your path is clear, you will honestly feel better about everything. You will know a lot more in days to come. Hang in there.... you will be ok even if you have to have chemo. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, I was stage 2 ER/PR positive, her2 negative, and I had chemo first to shrink the tumor before surgery. Age also made a difference in my treatment, I was 29 when diagnosed.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What does T1 cN1 mi MO mean?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Laura Cornwell Profile
      anonymous
      Industry Provider

      I think I can interpret this. T1c N1mi M0
      T1c - referring to primary tumor size, it was more than 1 cm in greatest dimension but less than 2 cm.
      N1mi - means they found cancer cells in one to three lymph nodes outside the primary tumor. but mi means micrometastases which means that there were a...

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      I think I can interpret this. T1c N1mi M0
      T1c - referring to primary tumor size, it was more than 1 cm in greatest dimension but less than 2 cm.
      N1mi - means they found cancer cells in one to three lymph nodes outside the primary tumor. but mi means micrometastases which means that there were a relatively small number of cancer cells in the lymph node.
      M0 - means there are no metastases in any other part of the body

      Because it was classified as N1mi instead of regular N1, this would describe a stage IB rather than stage II breast cancer. So worse than stage IA, but better than Stage II.

      Comment
    • Elaine Mills Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Look up "pathology results" on the internet. I got great information from doing that.

      Comment
  • Cynthia Flexen Profile

    I dont know whether I should have a Bilateral mastectomy or just single mastectomy? I have DCIS in my left breast. I do not have the BRCA1 or 2 gene so that is why I dont know what to do??? Any advice please?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Cynthia, have you spoken to your Breast Surgeon about their opinion? That's very good news you don't have either of the BRACA genes. I will have my test performed this week. That's a tough decision, whether to remove both breasts. I have Stage IIIc IDC. It's a later stage plus my...

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      Hi Cynthia, have you spoken to your Breast Surgeon about their opinion? That's very good news you don't have either of the BRACA genes. I will have my test performed this week. That's a tough decision, whether to remove both breasts. I have Stage IIIc IDC. It's a later stage plus my non-cancerous breast has several calcifications and a fluid filled cyst. Trouble brewing there. So I've chosen to have both removed. It's such a personal choice I can only relate my story to you. A good medical site to go to with fact based research is breastcancer.org. Or the book "Dr Susan Love's Breast Book". both has so much helpful info. Thinking of you on your journey,

      Diana

      2 comments
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I just had a bilateral mastectomy one week ago. I have cancer in one breast only. I choose a bilateral because it made more sense to me to have two breasts that could look as similar as could be.

      Comment
  • Laura Gaspard Profile

    Are Mammograms Painful?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Juliette Zweig Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I just got one yesterday. I personally don’t find them painful, and not even that uncomfortable. My breasts are very tender and I have no problem. Plus, they are fairly quick. You’re out and about fast. Making the annual visit no big deal.

      Comment
    • Kim Flackey Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No. I find them to be more uncomfortable than painful. It also depends on the time of the month. Your breasts are usually more tender right before your period. Try and schedule it after your period and this should help. Of all medical tests, this is the one I dread the least. It's no biggie.

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    My good friend has just been diagnosed with breast cancer. What can I do or say to help her through this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Francine Williams Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile...

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      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile that is one thing Cancer can't take from u

      2 comments
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of...

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      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of you today. Also, don't say "let me know if there's something I can do" bc it puts the burden back on her and it's so hard to ask for help. Instead, ask when her appointments are and plan to go with her (if she has no one else that can go), stop by (call or text first) with a meal when she's sick from chemo and clean up a little while you're there. Bring funny movies or books ('the sh*t my dad says' is hilarious--someone gave it to me), bring gossip, distractions are good. Try not to probe by asking a ton of questions all the time, but let her know you're always there to listen. She'll start to open up when she wants. If she's sad, let her be. Be comforting but don't give advice. (like empathize and say you know it must be hard and scary, but don't say things like, look for the silver linking, or try to be positive...some days, she'll just be sad and angry will need a shoulder to cry on)

      When she's feeling well, keep her busy! If you aren't always free, create a calendar for friends/colleagues that can cook, visit, take her out, etc.

      If she plans on wearing a wig, offer to go with her to pick it out before her hair falls out. Then, when it starts to fall out, offer to shave it (my friend gave me a Mohawk).

      When her treatments are over, months from now, keep checking in...that's a tough time emotionally, even when hair starts to grow back. Breast cancer is life changing and we still think about it even post treatment.

      Of course, you can't do it all, but get your friends together to help with all of this.

      I've truly seen who my true friends are with how they've dealt with my diagnosis. I'm young(32), and I've read and agree that breast cancer is lonely for young women bc most of our peers have no idea what it's like. If your friend is young, help her check out programs for young women with BC

      best wishes

      Comment

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