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Common Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I will be starting Arimidex and was wondering what is the best time of day to take this medication, my Oncologist says early morning, I would like to hear from someone already taking it.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Sorry I o ly lasted 2 weekson

      2 comments
    • tara mollick Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had to take Tamoxifen and I also took mine at night for the same reason as above :)

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does having breast cancer make you feel tired easily? (and I haven't started my treatment yet)

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3C Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Kathy M Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I remember feeling fatigued after diagnosis because of the emotional stress. After that each treatment sort of ads to the fatigue so keep active!

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I agree with Kathy. Even though you haven't began your treatment...the emotional toll of being diagnosed with breast cancer is exausting. I was very tired and stressed before I started treatment. It gets easier. I finished my chemo last month, and getting ready for my BMX on the 24th of this...

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      I agree with Kathy. Even though you haven't began your treatment...the emotional toll of being diagnosed with breast cancer is exausting. I was very tired and stressed before I started treatment. It gets easier. I finished my chemo last month, and getting ready for my BMX on the 24th of this month. Hugs and prayers,

      Diana

      1 comment
  • Jennifer Marks Profile

    I found a lump in my right breast and am going for a biopsy on Monday. (after an ultrasound where they found a suspicious mass) Should I be worried?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Hi Jennifer I would not be honest if I were to tell you not to worry. It's only human to worry especially when you are waiting for results of any kind. However, I will tell you try not to dwell on the outcome pray and ask God to give you strength and peace until they are received. I will also ...

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      Hi Jennifer I would not be honest if I were to tell you not to worry. It's only human to worry especially when you are waiting for results of any kind. However, I will tell you try not to dwell on the outcome pray and ask God to give you strength and peace until they are received. I will also be praying for you. Stay encouraged maintain your Faith and Hope. Remember all If not most of us on this site are here to support you.

      Love and Blessings
      Your Sister of Hope!!!

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jennifer, i know finding a lump is scary. I've been there. You're doing the right thing by having a biopsy. It's difficult waiting for the results but, just know that 80% of biopsies are benign. So keep your chin up and I'll say a prayer that you're in that 80%! Take care. :)

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I'm 6 days out after my first neulasta shot and started having hip pain and lower back pain yesterday. Is this normal?? I'm gonna call my oncologist today.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am always glad to hear you will be contacting your oncologist's office since you are having a question about pain. During your treatment, bone pain, joint pain, discomfort is common. It may be due to the chemo treatment or Neulasta injection... so it is hard to say. Your doctor may suggest...

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      I am always glad to hear you will be contacting your oncologist's office since you are having a question about pain. During your treatment, bone pain, joint pain, discomfort is common. It may be due to the chemo treatment or Neulasta injection... so it is hard to say. Your doctor may suggest something for the pain so it is good you will be talking to the office today. We have been there and some of this board are in treatment right now. Hang in there, gal. Please keep in contact with us. Take care, and blessings to you. Sharon

      Comment
    • Kim Amelio Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      I can help with this!! My mom heard that if you take Claritin the night before your Neulasta shot and continue to take it for like three days ( Claritin.. not Claritin D) you get no joint pain!! And it worked.. she had no pain whatsoever. It's worth a try.. everyone she knows who has taken it...

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      I can help with this!! My mom heard that if you take Claritin the night before your Neulasta shot and continue to take it for like three days ( Claritin.. not Claritin D) you get no joint pain!! And it worked.. she had no pain whatsoever. It's worth a try.. everyone she knows who has taken it never got the joint pains.. good luck=)

      4 comments
  • Jennifer Swallow Profile

    My doctor said that my mammogram and ultrasound show nothing, but the lumps are still there and sore. What should I do? I know an MRI would be good, but what if my doctor refuses to order one?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is your body.... the doctor can't refuse to order a test for you. I had a bit of an argument with my doctor about an MRI but he quickly relented and ordered it for me. An MRI will show what a mammogram and an ultrasound can't. In my case, it would have found my breast cancer much earlier....

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      This is your body.... the doctor can't refuse to order a test for you. I had a bit of an argument with my doctor about an MRI but he quickly relented and ordered it for me. An MRI will show what a mammogram and an ultrasound can't. In my case, it would have found my breast cancer much earlier. Be polite, be nice, but be persistant, and win this one as if your life depended on it. I hope Diana reads this as she will also support you in getting an MRI. You GO GIRL!

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jennifer. I totally agree with Sharon. You have lumps that a mammogram & ultrasound aren't picking up. Hopefully they are benign....but you don't know. It's crucial that you have an MRI preformed. I wished my doctors would have done one for me. Thus my cancer was found much too late. It is...

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      Hi Jennifer. I totally agree with Sharon. You have lumps that a mammogram & ultrasound aren't picking up. Hopefully they are benign....but you don't know. It's crucial that you have an MRI preformed. I wished my doctors would have done one for me. Thus my cancer was found much too late. It is your body and you need to demand more testing. If your doctor refuses then it might be time to find another doctor. Take care Jennifer & keep us posted

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Any advice for treating this awful furry feeling inside my mouth? I am just one week into a new TC regimen, and some foods taste okay, but the texture thing is really bothering me.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    almost 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I was taxotere/cytoxan all i could taste is chocolate and rusty pipe. Texture is alway a big deal for me. I lived on yogurt(really cold) and crackers and protein drinks. On the few days I could taste ipa beer and really spicy salsa an hour later lots and lots of tums.

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I think biotine, that mouthwash for sensitive mouths might help

      Comment
  • Delicia matthews Profile

    What is unilateral mastectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      A unilateral mastectomy is the surgical removal of one breast. A bilateral mastectomy is the removal of both breasts.

      Comment
  • Kristine Fonseca Profile

    I just had bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction 30 days ago. I still have the tissue expanders in. I am still in a lot of pain. Is this normal? If so, how long does it last.? The pain is 24/7 with no relief.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Kristine have you made your doctor aware of your constant pain? I had reconstruction at the time of my mastectomies. My breast or chest area felt tight like my breast was engorged when I was breast feeding I took Vicodin for pain every 4-6 hours that first week then Advil was enough for the...

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      Kristine have you made your doctor aware of your constant pain? I had reconstruction at the time of my mastectomies. My breast or chest area felt tight like my breast was engorged when I was breast feeding I took Vicodin for pain every 4-6 hours that first week then Advil was enough for the pain. I have no experience with tissue expanders. I had to lay with my head elevated propped up on pillows sitting on a recliner was best as soon as I laid flat I could feel the pressure in my chest. I also felt better wearing an ace wrap around my chest instead of a bra it felt better to have that firm support. Give your doctor a call and make him aware of your pain

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had a right mastectomy with an expander just over 2 weeks ago and after 2 days I was on regular tylenol and eventually ibuprofen. I took the havy duty stuff -- vicodin or valium -- at night. I only had one side, but it seems extreme to be having constant pain after 30 days. If you haven't...

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      I had a right mastectomy with an expander just over 2 weeks ago and after 2 days I was on regular tylenol and eventually ibuprofen. I took the havy duty stuff -- vicodin or valium -- at night. I only had one side, but it seems extreme to be having constant pain after 30 days. If you haven't tried the valium ask your doctor, as it acts as a muscle relaxer and can help a lot!

      Comment
  • Sandy MacDonald Profile

    Has anyone used Biotin for hair growth after chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • K G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yes, I take a pill everyday. I also use Nioxon shampoo and I am pleased with how fast my hair is growing back. I believe in it. Good luck.

      Comment
    • Cathy Wadkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Take 5000 mg from Walmarts and have a salon put a protein treatment in every 6 weeks and get your salon to buy the Bosley shampoo, conditioner, the 3 rd and the 4 th step as well I have nee

      Comment
  • Jessi Thompson Profile

    Can fibroglandular tissue that gets hard become dangerous in the future?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Jesse,

      In an overall picture, you have dense breast tissue. They are still deciding whether this predisposes a woman to breast cancer. What it does do is make it much more difficult to get a good, clear mammogram shot. This was my problem.... dense breast tissue which was very difficult to...

      more

      Jesse,

      In an overall picture, you have dense breast tissue. They are still deciding whether this predisposes a woman to breast cancer. What it does do is make it much more difficult to get a good, clear mammogram shot. This was my problem.... dense breast tissue which was very difficult to see through. I ended up with breast cancer that was not diagnosed by mammogram. If there is a question as to whether a lump is malignant or not, I would push my doctor to order additional testing such as an MRI or biopsy, etc. If I would have jumped up and down on the radiologist's chest, I would have been diagnosed at an earlier stage. Sometimes in life, you have to "take the bull by the horns" and be your own best advocate and insist on further testing. You could be saving your life. Put on those big girl panties and really talk to your doctor about the ramifications of dense breast tissue. It can be a real problem. You are right to question this! Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
  • Jo Thomas Profile

    Can I get a tattoo after chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2013
    over 5 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Jo Thomas Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Thanks girls! I'm planning on getting the word 'Courage' because without it none of us would get through this journey.

      3 comments
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Yes. Breast reconstruction includes a tattooed nipple. Never thought I would get a tattoo, but glad I did. ( Had it done after chemo). Best of luck to you with your bc journey. Take care.

      Comment
  • Carla Victor-rawson Profile

    What about exercise after lumpectomy. & SNB starting to feel a little swollen... Anybody know what to do? Was NOT given a lot of post op instruction

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had SNB a month ago they told me I could shower after a day and to slowly move my arm do it doesn't get stiff. I had a drain at the SNB site for two weeks. If it is swollen you might need to see the Dr so they can manually aspirate you. I hope you aren't feeling too sore.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Carla, Jo's post-op instructions are great. As for the exercise, it depends on what type. Walking would be great.... throwing your arms into the air, might not be a good idea. Weight lifting would be a NO. This is not long term probably a week or two at the most. Contact your doctor's office...

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      Carla, Jo's post-op instructions are great. As for the exercise, it depends on what type. Walking would be great.... throwing your arms into the air, might not be a good idea. Weight lifting would be a NO. This is not long term probably a week or two at the most. Contact your doctor's office to check with them to make sure especially about the suspected swelling. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does anyone have advice? I'm starting 12 weeks of taxol/herceptin weekly. Then nine months of herceptin every 3 weeks. I'm scared as heck.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I was very scared also. I did 5 treatments of taxotere,carboplatin n herceptin n then 9months of herceptin. For me,the chemo kicked my butt, I didn't do well. But it was over before I knew and now I am totally fine. You will get through it, try to stay hydrated before n after your treatments....

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      I was very scared also. I did 5 treatments of taxotere,carboplatin n herceptin n then 9months of herceptin. For me,the chemo kicked my butt, I didn't do well. But it was over before I knew and now I am totally fine. You will get through it, try to stay hydrated before n after your treatments. Make sure you let your oncologist know of any side effects. There's many drugs to alleviate bothersome symptoms.

      1 comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I've had over a year of treatment so far and only 3 Herceptin left. I started scared too!!! Walking, yoga and especially meditation have been invaluable. Having a support network, asking for help when you need it, praying to whomever you believe in, cuddling pets, Netflix movies, audiobooks all...

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      I've had over a year of treatment so far and only 3 Herceptin left. I started scared too!!! Walking, yoga and especially meditation have been invaluable. Having a support network, asking for help when you need it, praying to whomever you believe in, cuddling pets, Netflix movies, audiobooks all help. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other and your medical team will help you through any issues. Her2 is now an ok one to have - at least we have Herceptin and a bunch if new treatments in studies now too.

      1 comment
  • Rachael Leslie Profile

    My girlfriend was diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday. The appointment with the surgeon is next week to get specific answers. I want to do anything and everything I can to help her through this. Any advice is very much needed and appreciated!

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your...

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      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your support. Go with her to her appointments.... the diagnostic ones will be particularly important. She will need someone to --take notes-- as she will never be able to remember most of what is being said. This is a step by step process. Try to keep her from going to the really dark side. There are a ton of positive stories and outcomes to this lousy diagnosis. We, here, are living proof. Some of the journey's have been very tough but these strong women are here to share their struggles and outcomes. You are a dear friend to want to help her through this battle. Please stay in touch with us, we are here to help you and her along her path. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because...

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      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because when you are with the doctor we patients go blank I don't know how many times I was going to ask this that or the other thing and get into the office and I go blank my husband would just chime in for me Be patient with your girlfriend she will be on a whirlwind of emotions. Hold her tell her it's okay to talk about it all with you let her know your feelings also. My husband and I held each other up luckily one was always stronger then the other on those bad days. I have a link on my profile to my story of my personal experience with breast cancer in 2003. I take you from the initial diagnosis the biopsy surgery and recovery with a reflection a year later. Even though my type of breast cancer or choice of treatment may be different I hope by sharing my experience it will help other women and there family. http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How long does it take an axillary node dissection to heal? I'm having pain and numbness, plus, it's difficult to sleep at night. Should I go to a PT?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yup it hurts more than the mastectomy. I had nasty lymph webbing like a "cord" from my armpit to wrist. I went to Physio and it got me full range, reduced the pain, etc. But find a good one with experience in it.

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree with all the previous answers! My lymph node dissection (in April) hurt more than the mastectomy I ultimately had (in May). I did use a pillow - one that was longer and narrow - and slept on my back with my arm elevated on it. It helped until I could move around in my sleep more. I...

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      I agree with all the previous answers! My lymph node dissection (in April) hurt more than the mastectomy I ultimately had (in May). I did use a pillow - one that was longer and narrow - and slept on my back with my arm elevated on it. It helped until I could move around in my sleep more. I also had the numbness and it's still not 100% back to normal, but I am used to it, I think. It's a slow and sometimes painful recovery. Definitely get a referral for physical therapy. There are PT's who specialize in post-mastectomy.

      Comment
  • Susie Que Profile

    Can anyone offer insight on tamoxifen vs hysterectomy or hormone therapy and aromatase inhibitors?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Estrogen is produced by your adrenal gland and ovaries do even with a hysterectomy a form of estrogen blocker will be prescribed if you had a estrogen positive tumor. Tamoxifen is usually prescribed for women who have not gone through menopause. Femara and arimidex are usually prescribed for...

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      Estrogen is produced by your adrenal gland and ovaries do even with a hysterectomy a form of estrogen blocker will be prescribed if you had a estrogen positive tumor. Tamoxifen is usually prescribed for women who have not gone through menopause. Femara and arimidex are usually prescribed for women who are menopausal

      4 comments
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      If you have hormone positive cancer, you need something to block that. Tomoxifin is used for premenopausal women & arormatase is for post menopausal women. Even if you have a hysterectomy, your body produces hormones.

      Comment
  • kate eshleman Profile

    I had my drains removed Friday and understood some fluid under my mastectomy scars would be typical, but I actually look like I have small breasts again and it is uncomfortable. Is this typical?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Kate I had fluid build up post bilateral mastectomies my surgeon would manually drain the fluid with a syringe every other day for two weeks after my surgeries. I noticed the more I did with my arms the faster the bluish would build up. Also needed to sleep ony back propped up with pillows or in...

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      Kate I had fluid build up post bilateral mastectomies my surgeon would manually drain the fluid with a syringe every other day for two weeks after my surgeries. I noticed the more I did with my arms the faster the bluish would build up. Also needed to sleep ony back propped up with pillows or in a lazy boy recliner laying flat or on my side would also cause fluid buildup. In time the fluid build up will stop and reabsorb. Most important is if the areas is red and warm to touch or if you have a fever go to the emergency room as that could be a sign of infection take care

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Hi I had fluid build up for a year after surgery. I still have a little but nowhere near as much as the first year. It is fairly typical. I always showed my oncologist and surgeon anything that bothered me, just to be safe. Not sure what can be done although I did have lymphatic drainage...

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      Hi I had fluid build up for a year after surgery. I still have a little but nowhere near as much as the first year. It is fairly typical. I always showed my oncologist and surgeon anything that bothered me, just to be safe. Not sure what can be done although I did have lymphatic drainage treatments done by a licensed person.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Disscomfort right breast fuller heavier than left one; acute sharp pain/very tender. Full hystorectomy over 15 years ago hormone replacement. Mamograms last 3 years normal. My mom died from breast cancer before age 60.

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Any changes at all in the breasts should be checked out ASAP! My right breast was fuller than my left, tender, & swollen. It seemed to happen overnight. I was diagnosed with breast cancer. And this came 5 months after a so called "clean" mammogram. Please get it checked out. It may be nothing to...

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      Any changes at all in the breasts should be checked out ASAP! My right breast was fuller than my left, tender, & swollen. It seemed to happen overnight. I was diagnosed with breast cancer. And this came 5 months after a so called "clean" mammogram. Please get it checked out. It may be nothing to worry about...but you never ever want to take that chance!! Always better to be safe than sorry. Keep us posted on how you are.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My breast was uncomfortable, heavy and burning so I went and had a mammogram. They found IDC and I am mid way through my treatment. You need to have any changes to your breast checked out. Even more so because you have a family history. All the best.

      Comment
  • nancy  wilcox Profile

    Did anyone experience tingling in their fingers when your axillary nodes were inflamed?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 3 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Julie,

      yes with the finger tingles [tended to be thumb and next two fingers] however mine was related to after effects of Sentinel Node Biopsy. I had sentinal node under right armpit removed during surgery and tested for cancer cells while still under anethethic. No cancer cells were found so no...

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      Julie,

      yes with the finger tingles [tended to be thumb and next two fingers] however mine was related to after effects of Sentinel Node Biopsy. I had sentinal node under right armpit removed during surgery and tested for cancer cells while still under anethethic. No cancer cells were found so no further lymph nodes were removed.

      I found in weeks after surgery the rotation/range of motion in right shoulder got more and more limited and the finger tingles started. The physiotherapist i consulted said the finger tingles were related to nerves that had been disturbed/injured during the sentinel node surgery. I had a series of exercises to retain full range of motion in right shoulder and stretching exercises that ensured the lines of nerves etc in my right arm did not tighten and contract. My persisting with these physiotherapy exercises, the tingling would intensify immediately around the exercise period, but over a few months it gradually reduced to the point where it rarely happens these days. The physiotherapist said it was good I had come in within weeks of surgery when the problem first happened as it meant I was able to stretch scar tissue and nerves so they did not "set" in a tight position that caused irritation. Softening scars and lengthening nerves is harder work the longer you leave it.
      Tingles in right arm and right fingers can be associated with heart disease.
      Tingles in fingers especially in your dominant hand can be associated with carpel tunnel syndrome [over use by repetitive actions often cause it].
      Just reminding you that finger tingles can be associated with other things such as that or even constant sleeping on one side to ease pressure on breast cancer surgery side can also cause nerve compression and finger tingling if you are heavy, or even if you aren't, if you are constantly sleeping on one shoulder.

      Comment
    • Julie Dalton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello Nancy,
      I'm not sure whether I can be of any help, but I'll certainly try. Since I don't know how far you are on with your Chemo and/or Radiotherapy sessions I'm not able to form a proper judgement, but on what little I've read about tingling in your fingers when your Axillary nodes are...

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      Hello Nancy,
      I'm not sure whether I can be of any help, but I'll certainly try. Since I don't know how far you are on with your Chemo and/or Radiotherapy sessions I'm not able to form a proper judgement, but on what little I've read about tingling in your fingers when your Axillary nodes are inflamed all I can tel you is this; I had a mastectomy with 10 nodes removed last October. I did all the Exercises that they tell you to do after the Op in order to keep a full range of motion in the shoulder and arm area. Three months later, and during my Chemo sessions I discovered I had the condition they call Lymphoedema. This is brought on by loss of the Lymph nodes as I'm sure you know. Anyhow all I can tell you is that my hand is quite severely numb and tingly all of the time so obviously the nodes and the lymph and hand area are all connected and very very complimentary to each other. More than we realise I think. If you'd like to keep in touch or have any more questions then I'd be only too pleased to hear from you - my email address is; daltonfox@btinternet.com and my name is Julie. Bye for now. Take care, Julie

      1 comment
  • Aunia Hall Profile

    I have an ultrasound guided biopsy on Monday and my Dr. said I should hear something in 2-3 days after. How long does it actually take to get the pathology report and test results?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      An MRI guided biopsy is different than an ultrasound guided biopsy. An ultrasound biopsy is not that bad really, it only takes about 15 min. Good luck and just keep in mind that most biopsies come back not showing any cancer.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Aunia, we all understand the angst of the wait. I had to wait 3 days. I also had an ultrasound guided biopsy. It didn't take that long and like Diana, I was just a little sore afterward.... remember to put some ice on the area. So many of these are benign, so don't worry yourself sick about...

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      Aunia, we all understand the angst of the wait. I had to wait 3 days. I also had an ultrasound guided biopsy. It didn't take that long and like Diana, I was just a little sore afterward.... remember to put some ice on the area. So many of these are benign, so don't worry yourself sick about it. Your doctor is just being proactive and looking out for your best interest. I have a huge circle of friends and many of them have had this type of test..... of them all, I am the only one whose test came out positive. Hang in there Aunia.... we are all here to help support one another. Blessings to you, Sharon

      Comment
  • Betsy Krueger Profile

    What is a good cream for a mastectomy scar?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alison Johnson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I like eucerine, it's at most pharmacies. 2 year after treatment and I still use it each night.

      2 comments
    • Betsy Krueger Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the...

      more

      Thanks for the continuing suggestions. Since my separate surgeries, I used Mederma on scars. I waited till scars stopped feeling so tender after all the scabs healed. I still look somewhat like I had open-heart surgery,

      I look better as time goes on. I'll always know that I had the surgeries, but the scar tissue on each side of scars no longer looks so reddish and painful. I think, too, that the rubbing I did. It helped me not think it was weird and ugly, and it has helped me not feel so regretful that all the cancer occurred. Maybe that's part of "touch."

      Thank, again. This thread does get read by others, so I think it's valuable to continue to have suggestions.

      Comment
  • Linda Wells Profile

    What is necrosis of the breast? I have had SEVERAL mammograms done and 2 biopsies on my left breast and the necrosis didnt show up until I had a sonogram. I have had pain in my left breast continually and I cannot hold a book or my grandchild against it.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Necrosis is tissue - such as breast fat - where damage to the cells has occurred. Necrotic is a Greek derivation and it means death. So in medical usage it refers to prematurely dead tissue when the host body remains alive. The thing is the dead tissue in a live organism can arise from a...

      more

      Necrosis is tissue - such as breast fat - where damage to the cells has occurred. Necrotic is a Greek derivation and it means death. So in medical usage it refers to prematurely dead tissue when the host body remains alive. The thing is the dead tissue in a live organism can arise from a multitude of causes. It can be a blow to the area, radiation can do this - even the bite from a white spider can cause tissue death. So if you have a breast histopathology report stating after a biopsy that they found necrotic cells within a tumour positive for breast cancer, this means there were dead cells in the tumour site. In a normal breast, if necrosis is present it normally does not mean breast cancer as it can happen from so many things. A friend had this from a grandchild accidentally kicking her hard in the chest for example. The question to ask is - is your necrosis associated with breast cancer or some other condition.

      4 comments
  • Giselle dominguez  Profile

    My mom was recently told she was in stage 2 of breast cancer - I'm really scared and want to know how bad is stage 2?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    almost 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Janice Baker Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Its going to be okay. I am a survivor that was diagnosed with stage 3c. I have completed surgery, chemo and radiation. My cancer also went into my lymph nodes. I'm praying for you and your mom.

      1 comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast...

      more

      Giselle,
      My sister & cousin both had triple negative breast cancer (in their lymph nodes, too) & are both survivors! My best friend is fighting stage III triple negative breast cancer right now at the age of 26 & she's kicking it's ass! Your mom will, too. If there is a family history of breast cancer or your mom is younger than 40, you might talk to your doctor (&/or hers) about genetic testing. They have identified gene mutations that drastically increase your risk of breast & ovarian cancer. I don't mean to freak you out or imply that anyone in your family has one of these gene mutations, I am merely passing on information that might prove helpful.

      Like Diana, I recommend your mom get in touch with other women who have or have survived breast cancer. She may meet some during treatment or you can help her search for a local support group.

      And at 10 weeks pregnant, your mom has plenty of time to enjoy your pregnancy! If she begins chemo treatments or undergoes surgery soon, I'm sure just thinking about you & that little one will lift her spirits & help her fight. You ladies can get through this! I'll keep you all in my most positive of thoughts.
      Sending Love!

      1 comment
  • Deborah St. Aubin Profile

    I am four months post chemo and my hair seems to be growing back so slow, about I/2 inch and slightly longer in the back is this normal? Before Breast Cancer and Chemo my grew really fast , now I am scared it May never grow as before.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Deborah,
      Not to worry!!! I, too, had the fast growing hair but after chemo, that initial growth seemed to take 8 months. It will grow, and it will go back to the way it was growing. Be patient, it will come back, it just takes awhile. Hang in there, Sharon

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Oh please don't worry it takes a long time, mine grew slowly the first year, really slow.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Breast lumps on both breasts, sized 3cm, 2.8 0.8 & 0.5 on the ultrasound. I also have a family history of breast cancer - my dad's Aunt. It increases my risk that it's breast cancer. What should I do?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You should go to your doctor immediately. Early detection makes a big difference.

      Comment
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I found the tumor in my left breast 2 years ago, at 42 y.o. Same week I did the ultrasound - we jump the step of mammogram because it was clear where the thing was. With the ultrasound we found 2 more tumors, and the confirmation of being a mass. One more week I had the biopsy. Then surgery - I...

      more

      I found the tumor in my left breast 2 years ago, at 42 y.o. Same week I did the ultrasound - we jump the step of mammogram because it was clear where the thing was. With the ultrasound we found 2 more tumors, and the confirmation of being a mass. One more week I had the biopsy. Then surgery - I opt for double mastectomy because I had a high risk over 60% to have in the other breast in the future. Best thing I did because in the biopsy post surgery, they did find a tinny tumor on my right breast, still not detectable by any test.
      Started chemo 1 month after surgery. Then had the genetic test done, and I'm BRCA 2 positive - high risk for ovarian cancer. As soon as I finished the chemo, I had a surgery to remove the ovaries. Then did reconstruction, and now I am healthy, happy and with really little risk of reincidence! Easy? No, it was a trip to hell, painful, scary, I still have neuropathy, joint pains and chemo brain. But I wouldn't change any of the steps I took because I'm alive and happy, very happy!!!! My conclusion and answer for you: don't waste time. As soon as you can have the alien removed from your body, better chances for everything to be all right!!

      1 comment

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