loading... close

Common Questions

  • jenny rios Profile

    I just have a silly question. Can you be around kids after each radiatiion treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • vicki e Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      When you have a pet/ct scan you have residual radiation and can't be around children or pregnant women for 18 hours. Regular rad treatments don't have that effect though

      7 comments
    • Lisa Taylor Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Hi Jenny, of course your granddaughter can be around you! Me and my doctor always said I could tell my grand kids that I can glow in the dark! They told me that was awesome!

      Comment
  • Kreesha Kuru Profile

    What are the symptoms of breast cancer ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      It's very hard to define symptoms for breast cancer. Everyone is different. Some women do not have any noticeable symptoms. Others notice a lump or a discharge from the nipple.

      The safest course is to have your yearly exames, Know your own body, and know your family history. If you have...

      more

      It's very hard to define symptoms for breast cancer. Everyone is different. Some women do not have any noticeable symptoms. Others notice a lump or a discharge from the nipple.

      The safest course is to have your yearly exames, Know your own body, and know your family history. If you have concerns, discuss them with your doctor right away.

      4 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Patient

      I also had bad night sweats. I could sleep naked w no sheets and still b drenched

      Comment
  • Alysa Fields Profile

    Is 1.6 centimeters considered large for a breast lump?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That's the reason I ended up doing an MRI as there was a discrepency between the screening mammo, the additional views, and the U/S and they wanted to determine the size before doing anything else.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      There is a lot more than just size that is important. The type of breast cancer, how aggressive the cancer is (grade) whether it is reactive to hormones and how many positive lymph nodes are involved. My friend had a huge tumor but it was non-aggressive. So size isn't everything for sure in...

      more

      There is a lot more than just size that is important. The type of breast cancer, how aggressive the cancer is (grade) whether it is reactive to hormones and how many positive lymph nodes are involved. My friend had a huge tumor but it was non-aggressive. So size isn't everything for sure in breast cancer. Mine was 2.2 cm,
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Should I be concerned about a 9mm cyst or cluster of cyst on left breast with calcifications seen ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I believe a second opinion would ease your mind. It would mine. Most insurance companies cover second opinions. Best wishes, jayme

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had the same thing and when they did the biopsy, it was DCIS. You have so many more options when it is diagnosed early. My advice- get a biopsy. Best of luck to you.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My first chemo is tomorrow and I'm scared... looking forward to know there are 5 to go. I'll be glad when the first one's over to tackle the side effects.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 15 answers
    • View all 15 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 1998

      Good luck stay positive. When I had my chemo I was more afraid of it than anything else. Turns out it wasn't that bad. I just made sure I took all the meds at the correct times that my doctors prescribed. I was afraid of the fear of chemo . Once the 1st treatment was over I realized ....I can...

      more

      Good luck stay positive. When I had my chemo I was more afraid of it than anything else. Turns out it wasn't that bad. I just made sure I took all the meds at the correct times that my doctors prescribed. I was afraid of the fear of chemo . Once the 1st treatment was over I realized ....I can do this, it is amazing what we let. Fear do to us. Be very good to yourself you deserve it. God Bless

      Comment
    • cindy stephenson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Just be comfortable. Bring someone with you and something to do. Just relax - u will get thru this .

      1 comment
  • Lisa W Profile

    I will be doing chemo here shortly (A.C.T.) and them Hormone Therapy. Anyone go through this too?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Lisa,
      Your treatment is a common treatment for IDC. I had 4 AC treatment but not the "T" portion. You are probably apprehensive about the upcoming appointments just because of the unknown. The members on this board are here to help you through this. We've been there, done that and we are...

      more

      Hi Lisa,
      Your treatment is a common treatment for IDC. I had 4 AC treatment but not the "T" portion. You are probably apprehensive about the upcoming appointments just because of the unknown. The members on this board are here to help you through this. We've been there, done that and we are alive because of it. The side effect none of us has side-stepped is the hair loss. When I asked my oncologist when I would lose my hair and he, very matter-of-fact said "2 weeks after the first treatment." Dang, if he wasn't right! I was ready for it with a wig, hats, and great scarves. I ended up going "commando" (bald) most of the time. Everyone has different reactions to chemo. My taste and sense of smell changed. I love chocolate and coffee. During chemo, I couldn't stand either. I took a drug called "Emend" for nausea and was not nauseated. The first few days after a treatment, I felt like I had the flu... weak. It always turned around and within 5 days I was back to normal. Be particularly careful about your weakened immune system. Try not to hang around crowds, WASH YOUR HANDS FREQUENTLY, and ask your pals not to visit if they feel the least bit punk-ish. Mention ANY side effects you are having to your oncologist and staff. Do not be afraid to ask questions about your treatment. If you have something that doesn't seem right between your appointments, CALL. I am now into my 5th year of hormone blocking treatment. I am taking Femara and have had some bone and joint pain but it has been tolerable. I'd say, for me, the hot flashes have been a pain but as a friend told me... I'm am just having my own "personal summer." HA!
      You are always welcome here! We are all sisters and want to support each other through treatments, after treatments, anytime. You just take these appointments one treatment at a time.... just like eating an elephant, one bite at a time! As a post script.... some of the funniest times I had were having my treatments. I was in a room with several other people also having their treatments. We were all in the same boat, someone would start something and pretty soon we were ALL laughing. We wore funny hats, we had "picnics" and we laughed about our circumstances. (my picture is my treatment around Christmas.... reindeer antlers.... and we all laughed) Hang in there gal! You will make it through this. We all care about you. Please keep in touch with us.

      1 comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yep, I have my last ACT treatment this week! I'll probably be on Avastin afterwards. Everyone reacts differently to this combination. I had practically no nausea or vomiting. The exhaustion and fatigue are what really have gotten to me, as well as general weakness. I was in pretty good shape...

      more

      Yep, I have my last ACT treatment this week! I'll probably be on Avastin afterwards. Everyone reacts differently to this combination. I had practically no nausea or vomiting. The exhaustion and fatigue are what really have gotten to me, as well as general weakness. I was in pretty good shape when I started chemo last November, but now I get out of breath going up a flight of stairs. I always use a cane because I have Parkinson's, but with the chemo sometimes I use a walker because I'm so weak and unbalanced.

      I have a slight allergy to the Taxotere. I break out in red spots all over my torso, arms, and face, and I feel like I have head allergies. I also develop a wicked headache. Benadryl tabs take care of it. The Neulasta shot I get the day after chemo also can have some side effects. During my first 3 treatments or so, I would develop terrible bone and joint pain. Neulasta is intended to encourage white cell production in your bone marrow, and that causes the pain. But I haven't had much of it the last 2 treatments.

      "Chemo brain" can be a challenge, too. I started to forget a lot of things such as names, where I left things, and most particularly whether I had already told someone something. I end up repeating myself several times; everyone is so nice not to harp on the fact that they've heard it before.

      Take it day by day and don't anticipate anything, because it may not happen. Take it as it goes. If you do get a side effect or two, stay on top of them whether it's nausea/vomiting, pain, or other things. Your doctor should give you medication for any of the side effects -- just don't let them get full-blown before you take the meds.

      Best of luck!

      2 comments
  • Carla Victor-rawson Profile

    When can I take a shower after my Lumpectomy & SNB ? Had surgery on 7/25 bandages removers on 7/27 the stitches look awful but no infection & no drainage... Wasn't given much post op instruction.... What about exercise for my underarms?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My surgeon said 24 hours post op I could shower. I had to be careful raising my arm, but as long as I took it slow and was careful I was ok. I felt so much better after showering. I had steri strips (white tape) covering my stitches and was told to keep them on till they fell off on their own-...

      more

      My surgeon said 24 hours post op I could shower. I had to be careful raising my arm, but as long as I took it slow and was careful I was ok. I felt so much better after showering. I had steri strips (white tape) covering my stitches and was told to keep them on till they fell off on their own- I had to peel them off after my 10 day post op visit, they stayed on that good! The one issue I had after the axillary node dissection was I heard and felt "swishing" when I moved. I wasn't sure if it needed to be drained, so I made an appointment and was reassured that it was normal and it did go away on its own. Best of luck with your recovery!

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I was allowed to take a shower 24 hours later, just had to cover my surgery scars n drain holes ( icch). I couldn't stand not taking a shower. I would just be sure to keep incision away from water to be safe.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was just diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma grade 2. Anyone out there with same situation? I am leaning towards lumpectomy, but wondering if it is the right way to go?

    Asked by anonymous

    about 6 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I opted for a bi lateral mastectomy, it gave me more peace of mind and I am glad I did it.

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      It would depend on so many different things. You mentioned your tumor is grade 2. Do you know what stage you are? Are you HER2 - or ? BRACA? What do your other tests results say?

      1 comment
  • Linda Hubbard Profile

    I am starting taxol/herceptin weekly. What side effects have you had?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • P G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      Had my last one today (12 weekly treatments after FECH 4x every 21 days) TH wasn't bad, I do have numbness in my feet and hands, most of the time my stomach is ok and I am able to go to the gym and work. I wish you good luck! It will be over before you know it :)

      Comment
    • Roz Potenza Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Water! Water!! Water!!! Can't stress that enough. And I can tell you that it wasn't easy to drink sometimes.
      I found my worst days to be days 3 and 4 after chemo. Day 5 I would start to feel better, etc.
      I had similar symptoms to Andre and I also got... well. stopped up and it caused me...

      more

      Water! Water!! Water!!! Can't stress that enough. And I can tell you that it wasn't easy to drink sometimes.
      I found my worst days to be days 3 and 4 after chemo. Day 5 I would start to feel better, etc.
      I had similar symptoms to Andre and I also got... well. stopped up and it caused me terrible stomach cramps. I used Dulcolax religiously after the first time and I never got those bad cramps again. I also requested (and yes, you can do this too) a bag of IV fluids the day after chemo. I had to go in for a Nulasta shot anyway so I used to call this my "shot and a bag" day. It just helps to keep you hydrated and everything works better with that.

      You will have good and bad days but you will also get through them. Keep your eye on the prize! Your well being. Good luck and hugs!

      2 comments
  • Tamara Davidson Profile

    Had my first radiation treatment today,, has anyone ever tried coconut oil? I have aloe plants and aquafor. .

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    almost 5 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Fats ferreira Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Hi ladies, My mother is on treatment 24 of 28, then she'll be getting 3 to 5 Boosts, so far, her skin has been good,no redness, no peeling, no blisters, perhaps those that have been through this could tell if the boosts are worse? Than normal rads? here in South Africa, the protocol, seems a bit...

      more

      Hi ladies, My mother is on treatment 24 of 28, then she'll be getting 3 to 5 Boosts, so far, her skin has been good,no redness, no peeling, no blisters, perhaps those that have been through this could tell if the boosts are worse? Than normal rads? here in South Africa, the protocol, seems a bit different, my mom hasn't been allowed to wet that breast @ all, just a gentle wipe, and then apply Maizena (corn starch) powder to the breast, and for her underarms, she's been allowed no deodorants, no creams or anything! No bra allowed, and Loose clothing! I must say for those that are going to start this, my mom has breased through rads so far, she was so scared, and didn't want to do radiation, Because 6 months of Chemo was really really tough! God Bless you all!

      1 comment
    • Tamara Davidson Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Thanks for all the well wishes ladies I kinda read some threads online about the cocunut oil and people who have used it during their treatment and they claim it works I will try all that I have and see what happens,, anyway thank ya

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Does jp drain coming out hurt 2 wks after mastectomy? Did anyone remove it themselves or family do?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I'm a big baby and it didn't hurt at all! You will be relieved once they are out! I felt like I could actually move and start doing my exercises once they were out. I was so afraid to move while I had them thinking I was going to yank them out. LOL wishing you a speedy recovery ;)

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Agreed -- do NOT do it yourself. The doctor should pull it out quickly, like ripping off a band aid. Doesn't hurt. I just remember being surprised at feeling how far in those tubes were, so don't do it yourself! Getting them out will be such a relief not to have those things danglish off you...

      more

      Agreed -- do NOT do it yourself. The doctor should pull it out quickly, like ripping off a band aid. Doesn't hurt. I just remember being surprised at feeling how far in those tubes were, so don't do it yourself! Getting them out will be such a relief not to have those things danglish off you anymore.

      Comment
  • Samantha  Sheringer Profile

    One of my breasts is bigger then the other and it feels harder then the other, it hurts to the touch or when I jump or run - could this be breast cancer or just growth? (It hasn't seemed to have gotten any worse then past few months)

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Court Simas Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It could be growth or growing pains, but that depends on your age. If you're young, that's probably it. But if not, then it's hard to tell.

      In a situation like this, having it checked out by a doctor is probably the safe thing to do.

      Comment
    • Survivor's Daughter Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree. You should have it checked out. My mother's first sign was a change in breast size but it was not followed up by her doctor. When she had her mammogram a couple of months later, they found the growth. Could have been caught sooner if they had responded to the change in breast size.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Was anyone's husband not supportive

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Not my husband, but my son. (He's grown & gone with a family of his own) I had the hardest time telling him & all he did is listened, & said "ok" a couple times. Has never wanted to talk about it. I felt he didn't care. It wasn't until his wife told me how hard he is taking it, cries all the time...

      more

      Not my husband, but my son. (He's grown & gone with a family of his own) I had the hardest time telling him & all he did is listened, & said "ok" a couple times. Has never wanted to talk about it. I felt he didn't care. It wasn't until his wife told me how hard he is taking it, cries all the time & is so worried about me. It's been a year now, & I think he realizes now that I'm ok - never talks cancer, but he makes fun of my hair. So, my point is, everyone deals with things differently. Talk with your husband to see how he is really feeling. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      We have had women write in that has said their husband's left them when they were diagnosed. Breast cancer is a tough diagnosis on everyone and some husbands react in different ways. If this is your husband, you might talk to your oncologist about it and maybe you could get a referral to a...

      more

      We have had women write in that has said their husband's left them when they were diagnosed. Breast cancer is a tough diagnosis on everyone and some husbands react in different ways. If this is your husband, you might talk to your oncologist about it and maybe you could get a referral to a councilor to talk about why your husband can't be supportive. Take care, Sharon.

      Comment
  • sharon s Profile

    FYI Netflix documentaries. Watched the Gerson Miracle & I'm about to start watching Burzynski. Dying to Have Known is next. Before chemo, I watched Hungry for Change & Fat Sick & Nearly Dead. Hope they inspire us to be reactive & our own advocates.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Blood purification
      Liver detox
      Dead cell elimination
      Non animal protein or fats
      No sugar or ordinary table salt

      None of us want a reoccurance.

      Chemo means no raw to avoid infections but healthy variety appears key. Peel wash and bake.

      This information will be helpful to someone.
      For...

      more

      Blood purification
      Liver detox
      Dead cell elimination
      Non animal protein or fats
      No sugar or ordinary table salt

      None of us want a reoccurance.

      Chemo means no raw to avoid infections but healthy variety appears key. Peel wash and bake.

      This information will be helpful to someone.
      For me, I'm tackling it a step at a time. Surgery chemo (which I've tolerated without additional medicine except for severe reaction to taxol)

      Lets accept all the information and do what we can to help ourselves too.

      Very best.

      Comment
    • Tamara Davidson Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes it is awsome isn't it,,, I believe it it100%

      Comment
  • Blair Jenkins Profile

    I was recently reading my pathology report and it said Triple Negative Breast Cancer grade 9 (3+3+3) on the nottingham scale - my tumor was about 6cm but had not spread to any lymph nodes - what is grade 9?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2009
    about 7 years 2 answers
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Hi Blair,

      I was curious about your question and did a bit of research. Here is the best answer I came up with. It was given by:

      Kevin R. Fox, MD, Assistant Director, Clinical Affairs and Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of...

      more

      Hi Blair,

      I was curious about your question and did a bit of research. Here is the best answer I came up with. It was given by:

      Kevin R. Fox, MD, Assistant Director, Clinical Affairs and Associate Professor of Hematology/Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, responds:

      The Nottingham histologic score is simply a scoring system to assess the "grade" of breast cancers.

      It is a total score based on 3 different sub-scores. The 3 sub-scores are assigned based on 3 components of how the breast cancer cells look under a microscope. (The details of these 3 components are not critical for you to understand). Each of the 3 components is assigned a sub-score of 1, 2, or 3, with 1 being best and 3 being worst. Once the 3 sub-scores are added, a Nottingham score is obtained: the minimum score possible is 3 (1+1+1) and the maximum possible is 9 (3+3+3).

      A histologic grade of III is assigned to any patient with a Nottingham score of 8 or 9. Grade I refers to Nottingham scores of 3, 4, and 5, while Grade II refers to Nottingham scores of 6 and 7.

      In the end, the Nottingham score and histologic grades are not very useful in the big picture, as they do not alter final overall treatment recommendations. High-score cancers tend to relapse more often than low-score cancers. Ultimately, however, we don't use the score in making clinical decisions.

      I hope that this helps clear up any confusion. I wish you the best.

      4 comments
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Do you have a family history? If yes, I suggest genetic testing for the BRCA gene mutation.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What does pT2 N1 M0 mean on my diagnosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The T (size) category describes the original (primary) tumor:
      TX means the tumor can't be measured or found.
      T0 means there isn't any evidence of the primary tumor.
      Tis means the cancer is "in situ" (the tumor has not started growing into healthy breast tissue).
      T1, T2, T3, T4: These numbers are...

      more

      The T (size) category describes the original (primary) tumor:
      TX means the tumor can't be measured or found.
      T0 means there isn't any evidence of the primary tumor.
      Tis means the cancer is "in situ" (the tumor has not started growing into healthy breast tissue).
      T1, T2, T3, T4: These numbers are based on the size of the tumor and the extent to which it has grown into neighboring breast tissue. The higher the T number, the larger the tumor and/or the more it may have grown into the breast tissue.

      The N (lymph node involvement) category describes whether or not the cancer has reached nearby lymph nodes:
      NX means the nearby lymph nodes can't be measured or found.
      N0 means nearby lymph nodes do not contain cancer.
      N1, N2, N3: These numbers are based on the number of lymph nodes involved and how much cancer is found in them. The higher the N number, the greater the extent of the lymph node involvement.

      The M (metastasis) category tells whether or not there is evidence that the cancer has traveled to other parts of the body:
      MX means metastasis can't be measured or found.
      M0 means there is no distant metastasis.
      M1 means that distant metastasis is present.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Just shaved my head and trying to find cute ways to tie scarves but having trouble finding what I'm looking for. Anyone have a favorite video tutorial or website?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I used different colored pashminas and tied it at the back of my head(nape of neck) then wrapped it into a bun. Slap on some big hoop earrings and some make up and I was ready for the world

      Comment
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I used different colored pash

      Comment
  • Betsy Chapin Profile

    Has anyone experienced leg cramps when taking tamoxifen? I frequently wake up many times a night with leg pain and I have been on tamoxifen for 5 months.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2010
    over 6 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Omar Hinojosa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It is common as I wrote before, but it is crucial that you advise your oncologist. The drug has a slight risk for blood clots. Leg cramps are a common side effect with this drug, but if your pain is greater than that of a cramp or you feel chest pain, you need to advise your oncologist immediately.

      Comment
    • Omar Hinojosa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      This is a common for women.

      Comment
  • Valerie Torrence Nichols Profile

    Has the Oncotype DX test affected anyone's decision to have chemo? I would love to hear of someone else's experience.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 16 answers
    • View all 16 answers
    • Alison Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      It made all the difference to me! Everyone was sure I wouldnt need chemo but my results put me in the "grey area" between not needing it and needing it. It was a tough decision but since there isn't enough data out there about the "grey area" I decided to proceed with chemo. I would encourage you...

      more

      It made all the difference to me! Everyone was sure I wouldnt need chemo but my results put me in the "grey area" between not needing it and needing it. It was a tough decision but since there isn't enough data out there about the "grey area" I decided to proceed with chemo. I would encourage you to take the test.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Valerie,
      With this test, we have an opportunity to look into the future. Rather than carving that decision in stone, be open to the chance you might have to change. To have a golden opportunity right now to thwart a reoccurance and ultimately save yourself from additional treatment in the...

      more

      Valerie,
      With this test, we have an opportunity to look into the future. Rather than carving that decision in stone, be open to the chance you might have to change. To have a golden opportunity right now to thwart a reoccurance and ultimately save yourself from additional treatment in the future is worth its weight in gold. This will be your window of opportunity. Here's hoping for a very low score. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • André Roberts Profile

    Thanks Ladies for all the well wishes & prayers. Surgery went well. I'm sore as heck but I know it'll pass. Prayers to you all.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 5 years 12 answers
    • View all 12 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It's so nice to hear from you and know everything went well. Rest and take care of yourself. Hope your feeling better real soon. And smile it's over. Hugs jayme

      Comment
    • Wendy DeLong Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yay :D !!! So happy for you! I'm sure you'll have a speedy recovery. I'm not far behind you..... Surgery for me Jan 23 for my implants. Can't wait to get these expanders out!! Again, congrats!!

      Comment
  • Terri Miller Profile

    As you go thru the chemo treatments, do the side effects progressively get worse?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Terri,
      Just as Michele said, we are all different. I didn't have cumulative effects I had a week where I felt like I had the flu and then got better. It depends on how your body handles the chemo and how it recovers from each treatment. Take care Sharon

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Yes everyone is different. Mine got worse each treatment. Ive met people that really did well. My onco said i was an exception, i had every side effect.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone had a wire-guided lumpectomy? Or a on Q painball after lymph node surgery?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I did just last week! It is like the biopsy. The wires were placed during a mammogram (very awkward, I agree) but the areas were numbed so the needles/ wires didn't hurt. They stayed in for the surgery that followed immediately after.

      1 comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a wire guided lumpectomy.

      Comment
  • Chris Johnson Profile

    If all the cancer was removed, why do I need chemotherapy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Leann Moeller Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sharon,

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Chris, cancer cells can be very tricky. Not all can be picked up on a PET scan etc. i was diagnosed stage 3C last May. I had to go through chemo twice. Once before my mastectomy, then after as well due to extensive lymph node involvement. It wasn't easy but I'm so glad I did!!! And I'd do it...

      more

      Hi Chris, cancer cells can be very tricky. Not all can be picked up on a PET scan etc. i was diagnosed stage 3C last May. I had to go through chemo twice. Once before my mastectomy, then after as well due to extensive lymph node involvement. It wasn't easy but I'm so glad I did!!! And I'd do it all over again. I show no evidence of disease now!! I feel very blessed.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Once the mediport is put in does it hurt when they access it for blood draws, Chemo Infusions, etc.,

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 11 answers
    • View all 11 answers
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      I had my port put in 10-09 and it still remains in. I have been so fortunate with mine. Have never had any trouble. I go to get it flushed every month if it has not been accessed for anything. Mine is a power port. Only thing I feel when accessed is the needle prick. Good luck.

      Comment
    • Sarah Phinney Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Not at all. I found the first time accessing it, it was tender from being worked - but found after the needle was in (which was just a prick) nothing was painful for me. I also found the needle access became less apparent over time too. For infusions, I usually couldn't tell the difference...

      more

      Not at all. I found the first time accessing it, it was tender from being worked - but found after the needle was in (which was just a prick) nothing was painful for me. I also found the needle access became less apparent over time too. For infusions, I usually couldn't tell the difference between chemo, saline, or anti-nausea drugs -didn't hurt. Hang in there.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a second surgery as they didn't get clear margins the first time. So far I am stage 2a grade 3 2 lymph nodes involved. Is that bad? Still draining so can't get chemo yet.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    almost 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Breast cancer IS just plain bad! I was 2A and after my surgery was downgraded to a 2B because I had one lymph node positive. It is better if you don't have any lymph node involvement but you deal with what you have. Not knowing any more about your breast cancer except stage and grade,(type) 2A...

      more

      Breast cancer IS just plain bad! I was 2A and after my surgery was downgraded to a 2B because I had one lymph node positive. It is better if you don't have any lymph node involvement but you deal with what you have. Not knowing any more about your breast cancer except stage and grade,(type) 2A has you far from the end of your rope. Your surgeon and/or oncologist will go over all of your tests before you go on to the next part of your treatment. You are at a very treatable stage so you will be ok. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had lumpectomy then a second to clean up margins by the everything was done I was stage III ER no nodes. Mentally and emotionaly I was a wreck. I'm not a stupid person but I just get my head wrapped around everything. Everyday more life changing decisions to make. I had to make decisions about...

      more

      I had lumpectomy then a second to clean up margins by the everything was done I was stage III ER no nodes. Mentally and emotionaly I was a wreck. I'm not a stupid person but I just get my head wrapped around everything. Everyday more life changing decisions to make. I had to make decisions about issues I didn't think I had full understanding. Looking back I think it was denial. Breast cancer is a very bumpy road and so indivdual I finely figured out to trust my doctors/nurses/trusted and my good judgement.

      Comment

Questions

Common Topics

Looking for another topic? Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word