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Recent Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Chemo causes my mouth to feel coated in buttery, yucky Crisco. Anyone else have this & have suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I used plastic utensils that helped with my tastes during chemo. You may want to let your team know also as they might have something you can use to help with it. I always had what I called a "furry tongue" as that's how it felt at times.

      Comment
    • Sara G Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      (I didn't intend for my post above to be anonymous, apologies for my Beyond The Shock newbie mistake!)

      1 comment
  • Cha ro Profile

    Anybody had the doc to stop your radiation treatment & go back to doing chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No, sorry, I didn't have radiation, but I'm sure someone will chime in soon. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My place took a picture each week of my rads. but didn't do any lab work.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    which is more accurate test MRI or Mammogram?

    Asked by anonymous

    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on what type of breast cancer. Unlike Marianne, I had a lump which the MRI clearly showed..... better than the mammogram. If I would have been able to have an MRI at my last mammogram before my actual diagnosis, it would have caught my cancer at a much earlier stage. The breast...

      more

      It depends on what type of breast cancer. Unlike Marianne, I had a lump which the MRI clearly showed..... better than the mammogram. If I would have been able to have an MRI at my last mammogram before my actual diagnosis, it would have caught my cancer at a much earlier stage. The breast center refused to allow me an MRI because I didn't fit their criteria. Instead they took 15 mammograms! Lesson learned.... be your own best advocate. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      It really depends on the individual. I found my lump. It showed on a mammogram. An ultrasound pretty much confirmed it. I then had a biopsy. If your questioning something, get a second opinion. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    im 26 years old i had my MRI last 2013 it found some benign & malignant lump in my left & right breast. The doctor advise me to undergone mammogram & they found nothing.. But im still experiencing pain in my breast. What shall i do? &

    Asked by anonymous

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    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I agree, I'd be looking for a new doctor.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      RUN, don't walk to another doctor for a second opinion. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How do you stay positive as your family member undergoes chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    2 days 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I so agree.... many times, I had to be much stronger for my friends and relatives. I had to put on a brave face for them. In my "acting" I did actually make myself feel a lot better mentally and physically. I got so it was no longer an act but I did become my own power-house of positive...

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      I so agree.... many times, I had to be much stronger for my friends and relatives. I had to put on a brave face for them. In my "acting" I did actually make myself feel a lot better mentally and physically. I got so it was no longer an act but I did become my own power-house of positive energy. I looked forward to my chemo treatments and appointments because I knew it was one closer to being completed with treatment. I used to wear silly hats to my oncologists office because his office truly had a uplifting feeling. Always something tasty to eat, other patients laughing like we were all in this boat together. I never felt the treatments or appointments were doom and gloom. I think one has to be their own best advocate and set the mood when dealing with others. Lots of people were afraid of me and some of my best friends dropped me. I understood their fear and once I was through treatment, they drifted back. I actually made a whole new set of pals going through treatment. I had people say some very weird things to me.... like "How long do you have to live?" "My aunt died a horrible death from breast cancer back in the 50's." Some woman sent me a series of talks give by a professor who was dying of cancer..... At times, I just wanted to talk to people. I actually did a blog for the horse community I belong to. I wanted other women to know having breast cancer was not a death sentence. Going through treatment.... I had chemo and a mastectomy.... wasn't the end of the world. I wanted them not to be afraid of having regular mammograms. Early treatment is always the best. You can always ask what your relative needs.... a view meals the first couple of day after chemo is really appreciated. Their taste will change and is sometimes a bit eclectic. I wouldn't fix anything spicy, but just ask. You are kind for being sensitive. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Betti, Trisha, and Sharon have it nicely covered. I craved normal conversation. A conversation that was not about about cancer is what I craved. An evening of Wine and chick flicks was a wonderful diversion.

      Comment
  • Cha ro Profile

    The dr has stopped my moms radiation & put her back on chemo. Any of u have experience with the Adriamycin chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    2 days 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh yes, very common. It's called "Red Devil" and can be very tough on certain people. I really didn't have that much trouble. It made me ache like I had the flu. After about 4 days, I started feeling a lot better. I was never nauseated and was given a drug called Emend so I wouldn't be...

      more

      Oh yes, very common. It's called "Red Devil" and can be very tough on certain people. I really didn't have that much trouble. It made me ache like I had the flu. After about 4 days, I started feeling a lot better. I was never nauseated and was given a drug called Emend so I wouldn't be nauseated. My taste changed and some food did not taste good to me. SOmetimes your sense of smell is also effected.... things don't smell good. It can be tough on immune system but they give you an injection of Neulasta to counteract it. Be sure Mom stays hydrated. They will give her a handout with all the common side effects. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Sara G Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Hi. I completed Cycle 3 of 4 six days ago of Adriamycin & Cytoxan in "dose dense" treatments (aka every 2 weeks instead of 3), and can tell you what I'm experiencing. While the internet is an amazing tool, be wary because as all of us will acknowledge - side effects vary greatly from person to...

      more

      Hi. I completed Cycle 3 of 4 six days ago of Adriamycin & Cytoxan in "dose dense" treatments (aka every 2 weeks instead of 3), and can tell you what I'm experiencing. While the internet is an amazing tool, be wary because as all of us will acknowledge - side effects vary greatly from person to person! Not just biologically, but I believe emotionally.

      Before my chemo, I learned of the "red devil" term as well, and the infusion nurses will want to refer to it as something more adorable like "KoolAid" but the truth is - it's red and potent and for me it is literally shrinking my tumor in real time. The color doesn't bother me at all, and since your Mom has done chemo before, I imagine she just wants to be given something that works for her body.

      Side effect wise, I tend to experience: (1) fatigue, which is intermittent and a bit unpredictable - and sometimes my muscles feel like jelly so I just have to take it slow. (2) my mouth for the first week or so feels like it's coated in butter or Crisco, something I'm not finding others experience, so I plan to Ask about it here shortly. (3) the first 2 cycles I went hoarse and lost my voice for a couple of days. (4) hair loss. (5) taste changes - which requires creative hunting for what is now tasty or at least edible to you.

      Similar to what Sharon noted about Neulasta, on the 3rd->9th day after chemo I inject Neupogen into my belly fat at home, which also boosts white blood cells production in your bone marrow and help counteract your low counts. Since the injection is daily, it's a lesser dose so I thankfully don't feel the achy pains others have endured.

      I feel blessed to have manageable side effects and wish the same to your Mom and all those undergoing chemo. When the side effects weaken as the next Cycle approaches, I find it renews my strength and reminds me that my body is fighting back.

      Adriamycin is used often for breast cancer treatment and I wish your Mom and you the very best. xoxo

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I feel numb. Received a phone call the radiologist found a "cluster of calcification". I'm scheduled for more testing this week. Cluster sounds so scary. I'm not sure how I feel about this.

    Asked by anonymous

    2 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh my goodness.... do not panic! I have had many, many, friends who have had the same thing. They will do a biopsy, and see the kind of cells are within this cluster. So often, these turn out totally fine. If there are some cancer cells within, there are many, many, ways to treat this. This...

      more

      Oh my goodness.... do not panic! I have had many, many, friends who have had the same thing. They will do a biopsy, and see the kind of cells are within this cluster. So often, these turn out totally fine. If there are some cancer cells within, there are many, many, ways to treat this. This happens very often.... please take a big deep breath, no matter what, you WILL be OK!!! Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      There are several types of calcifications some being benign and others cancerous. That's the reason they've ordered more tests to determine their nature and if need be a biopsy of them.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    financial aid

    Asked by anonymous

    2 days 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      If you live in the U.S., there is Obamacare, & Medicaid, contact the American Cancer Society and talk to a counselor. You can also contact Susan G. Komen Foundation, they can also guide you with sources. Talk to your doctor's office too. Hospital's, in which you are going to receive care will...

      more

      If you live in the U.S., there is Obamacare, & Medicaid, contact the American Cancer Society and talk to a counselor. You can also contact Susan G. Komen Foundation, they can also guide you with sources. Talk to your doctor's office too. Hospital's, in which you are going to receive care will also have a financial counselor. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      There is help out there. From state, government and cancer groups. You just need to actively apply. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I know everyone is different but does anyone know how long it takes to get back to "normal" after having surgery and treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Normal old normal? Or new normal? Cancer changed my life forever. My hair grew back and my taste came back. My strength is not the same. I walk, gym, yoga I have to work at it. My body is not the same because of the meds. I live life and everything in it. There is a lot I don't stress about. Not...

      more

      Normal old normal? Or new normal? Cancer changed my life forever. My hair grew back and my taste came back. My strength is not the same. I walk, gym, yoga I have to work at it. My body is not the same because of the meds. I live life and everything in it. There is a lot I don't stress about. Not much makes me angry anymore except cancer. I treasure my friend, love ones, and my sisters. It breaks my heart what cancer can do to families. We work hard not to let cancer dominate our lives...but it does take work.

      Comment
    • Trisha Muller Quinn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      I had easy surgery .. Both girls off!!.. Chemo was totally bad ..all 6 treatments .. Rads was easy compared to chemo ... Then I spent 2 mths in hosp due to a staph infection in one of my exboobs !!!... I had put on about 20 kgs water weight during chemo ... I found it hard to lose this weight...

      more

      I had easy surgery .. Both girls off!!.. Chemo was totally bad ..all 6 treatments .. Rads was easy compared to chemo ... Then I spent 2 mths in hosp due to a staph infection in one of my exboobs !!!... I had put on about 20 kgs water weight during chemo ... I found it hard to lose this weight before I went back to full time work approx 3 mths after I finished all stuff !!!.... I have been working full time for the last year .... It's really only been lately that I feel that on getting on top of everything... I'm off for another operation in Oct. To have the rest of the girl stuff out due to hormones!!!.... I'm glad that I chose to do the treatment I did as I'm sure it was the right thing to do for me !.... Yes even through we are all different .. Know we all understand how your feeling ..and your thinking that life will never be the same .. But it does get back to a real normal ... But it takes time .. Cause your body has been to hell and back !! And don't forget the chemo is poison !!.. So hang in there , rest and do things that makes you feel special ... And know that on the bad days , family friends and us are here to listen ... Good luck ::))

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    After chemo do you start radiation right away or do you have to wait 1 month?

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I had my last chemo. on 10 June and started radiation on 17 July but I needed to move first to a new town. They do need time to do a SIM appointment prior to your first radiation treatment so they can do what is best for you. In looking at a calendar if I had had 6 cycles of chemo. rather than...

      more

      I had my last chemo. on 10 June and started radiation on 17 July but I needed to move first to a new town. They do need time to do a SIM appointment prior to your first radiation treatment so they can do what is best for you. In looking at a calendar if I had had 6 cycles of chemo. rather than 4 my radiation would have started even later because my last chemo. day would have been my actual first radiation day (if that makes sense). One's body needs a little break to heal further. There was a lady who was doing chemo. and radiation on the same days but I think she had colon cancer, she ended up in the hospital twice due to dehydration and had to undergo IV therapy to rehydrate her body.

      1 comment
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I started 5 weeks from my last chemo infusian. They need some time for your body to recoup from the chemo. The key to rads is hydrate and rest and use moisterizer from day 1. Most people use aqua phor and aloe. I couldn't use it so I used lindiskin soothing balm.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was recently diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ. Is it possible to just have a mastectomy? I don't wanna have to deal with this later I just want it gone. Anyone?

    Asked by anonymous

    4 days 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I don't blame you. It would be difficult for any surgeon to fault you on your desire. I would discuss it with your oncologist and get a consult with a surgeon who specializes in breast diseases/breast cancer and go from there. Women who are genetically predisposed to developing breast cancer...

      more

      I don't blame you. It would be difficult for any surgeon to fault you on your desire. I would discuss it with your oncologist and get a consult with a surgeon who specializes in breast diseases/breast cancer and go from there. Women who are genetically predisposed to developing breast cancer have prophylactic mastectomies. I'd be thinking you are in the same position. Hang in there.... I think you are on the right track. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everyone's case is different even with the same diagnosis. It depends on so many factors and a doctor will tell you what would be best for you and you only.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hair thinning from Anastrozole any suggestions

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    5 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You should ask your team about it as some things may not be recommended.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks ladies

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have heterogeneous solid ovoid mass what does this mean !

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    4 days 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Looking it up on google it is a varied solid mass and ovoid is the shape. It is not identifying what it is without a biopsy. They are just describing the spot, itself. Is your doctor recommending a biopsy? 80% of these things found are not cancer. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      We aren't doctors here but I know it could mean several different things, what has your doctor told you? The only way to tell what it is is to do a biopsy.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there a best time to do a self examination? Like before your period perhaps or after?

    Asked by anonymous

    6 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I was told after, because your breast will no longer be swollen because your hormones are lower then.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      After. At the same time every month. That way, you'll no price any changes. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Steff w Profile

    Aargh ! First chemo session in just over 12 hours - so nervous now it's almost time

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_2a Patient
    6 days 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      The first one is usually the longest. I looked forward to them because they were getting rid of the cancer but also I was one treatment closer to getting my life back. It is all a matter of perception. Try to turn your thinking around and turning it into a positive. You are also in the dark...

      more

      The first one is usually the longest. I looked forward to them because they were getting rid of the cancer but also I was one treatment closer to getting my life back. It is all a matter of perception. Try to turn your thinking around and turning it into a positive. You are also in the dark about what is going to happen and we tend to anticipate the worst for ourselves. I felt like I had the flu.... my muscles and joints ached. I was not nauseated, I was just tired. I listened to my body, and gave it what it needed. Stay hydrated, and eat what you can. Chemo can temporarily change your taste. I don't know what type of chemo you are receiving but there usually is that "hair thing" that starts to happen about day 14. Your scalp will tingle or hurt and it is a signal your hair is starting to drop. Hang in there, we have all been where you are going. You WILL make it! Keep in touch and take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Steff w Profile
      anonymous
      stage_2a Patient

      Thanks everyone!! I'm on high doses of Ducotaxol & cyclophosphamide. No allergic reactions at the hospital, home again now & feeling sleepy. I just realized I hadn't introduced myself properly since joining, so will go write "my story" :)

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    hi all the sore throat having chemo mine is soo sore only had one session about to have second does this improve

    Asked by anonymous

    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to tell your team about it as there may be things that they would recommend for it that would be OK to use while you're on chemo.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      You need to be sure to tell your dr. My mouth got a little sore, but not my throat. I hope you get relief. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mum's breast biopsy has came back eighty percent not cancer but they want to perform another and go in deeper. Anyone else had this?

    Asked by anonymous

    6 days 2 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No, but if needed I would do it again. You need to know for sure. Prayers yo you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I haven't had this but I used to help a surgeon do biopsies and there were times he wouldn't get the proper area hence the patient had to undergo another biopsy. I know it makes for nervous times but I'd rather have another if there is any question on the first one.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Should I have a nipple tattoo or have one made from my skin?

    Asked by anonymous

    6 days 2 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Do your research. It's a personal choice. I had nipples and areola made. (Tattoo for color) I wanted as real as I could get. When I go braless, my boobs look very real. You would never know they are fake. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to do what you're most comfortable with. Look into both and ask your doctor questions as to what they recommend.

      Comment
  • Dikra Saleh Profile

    Brca test for breast cancer , any advice whether to take the test even if my onco said I don't need it as no one in my family from moms side had any form of cancer esp breast cancer,

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    6 days 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Seeing as you don't have history, the test probably won't be covered under your insurance. At first I refused the test. No one in my family wanted to know. A year later, it was my Gyne who wanted to know for the ovarian cancer. I was negative. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Dikra Saleh Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi I have lobular breast cancer grade two stage two but would I need the test since I have a daughter just thinking about her. I've had a mastectomy n now on chemo

      1 comment
  • Dikra Saleh Profile

    Haven taken the nuelsta shot few times I didn't expect to get any side effects since I didn't have any before but today after the shot my body feels like I've got the flu especially the crampy like feeling in the ankles, anyone else go thru this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    6 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My oncology team told me to use Claritan after my Neulasta shots to help with any bone pain.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I hope it doesn't last long. I hated Neulasta! Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I try to decide whether to have a tattoo nipple or a three dimensional taken from skin from my body. Anyone have experience with this?

    Asked by anonymous

    6 days 1 answer
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      My nipples AND areola where made from skin along my bikini line. Tattooing for color. They look very real. I'm happy with them. It's really a personal decision. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Just been diagnosed with Brest cancer, had lumpectomy scheduled for begin sept. Can anyone give any advice on what to expect after this?

    Asked by anonymous

    7 days 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Norma  Cook Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      Dear Anonymous:

      I'm sorry to hear that you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, but you've come to the right place for encouragement and answers, at least to the best of our knowledge and experience. As frightening as the words "breast cancer" may be, the disease is usually quite treatable...

      more

      Dear Anonymous:

      I'm sorry to hear that you've been diagnosed with breast cancer, but you've come to the right place for encouragement and answers, at least to the best of our knowledge and experience. As frightening as the words "breast cancer" may be, the disease is usually quite treatable nowadays. Lumpectomy is the "easiest" route to take if that is what your doctor recommends. Depending on other factors, your surgery may involve the removal of lymph nodes under your arm, and be followed by chemo and/or radiation. A hormone-blocking drug, if appropriate, may be prescribed to prevent future recurrence of the cancer. A lumpectomy or "partial mastectomy" is a relatively quick surgery--around an hour, give or take--and you can expect to go home the same day, with someone else driving, of course. My anesthetist joked with my husband that it was not a good time to buy a new truck because I couldn't sign any legal documents in my "impaired" condition. There may be slight swelling and mild pain from the lumpectomy. The lymph node removal would be a bit more uncomfortable because of the bandages and swelling under the arm. (When my surgeon said she had removed a golf-ball sized section of breast tissue in order to get wide, clear margins around my tiny tumor, I wanted to tell her that it felt like she had re-inserted that "golf ball" under my arm!) Your surgeon will do a follow up in a week or two to check the incision. The pathology report should be available to indicate what further treatment, if any, is required. Be sure to have a supportive person with you to take notes and help you remember details. The important thing to realize is that everyone's situation is unique to that individual, so the treatment you receive will be what is best for you. Keep in touch and let us know how you are doing. Norma

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      One thing I always forget about, is.... In the weeks following, you may feel tingling, zapping like feeling. May even be like being stabbed. This is normal as nerve endings are coming back to life. You may also have areas of numbness. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    As anyone have gotten their port removed after chemo

    Asked by anonymous

    8 days 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      My oncologist had mine removed within a month of completely treatment. It was a quick office procedure and I felt a great sense of mental relief. I thought of every one of my appointments another step closer to getting my life back. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I could not wait to get that much needed but hated thing out of me 1 month after my last chemo infusion.

      Comment
  • Marcia Torbett Profile

    Are there symptoms to having a low white blood cell count? My hemoglobin is OK but my white count is very low and I am exhausted.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    8 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      You are experiencing them right now.... exhaustion. You may be more susceptible to virus's too. Ask your doctor. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I'd think exhaustion would be the main symptom. What have your doctor(s) told you? We aren't doctors here but I imagine if you search for low white count it would probably lead to some symptoms.

      Comment
  • Sharon Danielson Profile

    Some idiot is asking if we want a loan. Another spammer trying to make a dollar on other people's misery. I flagged every one of them.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    8 days 3 answers
    • Samantha (Admin) Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Sharon,

      Thank you for bringing this to our attention, and for being so diligent in flagging spam postings. I have suspended this particular user, and will continue to monitor the site closely for any further issues.

      Sincerely,
      Samantha M. (Beyond the Shock Administrator)

      3 comments
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I know what you mean as I found a couple a few weeks back written in a foreign language of some sort that no one could understand. I hope you're doing well.

      Comment

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