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What is the survival rate for stage 2b IDC

Sharon Doria Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Survivor since 2009 over 5 years
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  • André Roberts Profile
    anonymous
    Stage 1 Patient
    Don't live your life by numbers. You don't have an exoneration date. Breast cancer isn't the death sentence it once was. So many improvements with treatments. If you do all that is recommended by your Dr's, you can live a very long life. Prayers to you.
    over 5 years Flag
    • Mandana K. Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Very good,thx.

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Thank you Andre. Just so scared as it was over 5 cm..

      over 5 years Flag
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2007
    Sharon, I was also a 2B IDC. I am still here nearly 7 years later. Breast cancer is NOT the killer is used to be. So many treatments available. Many woman go to the "How Long Do I Have?" place when they are diagnosed. (I did too). When I was going in for my biopsy, I asked the radiologist "Am I going to die"? She laughed and said...."From this little thing????" (followed by laughter) Don't think that way! You will go through treatment and plan on living a full life! The statistics for for 5 years which doesn't mean you are only going to live 5 years. That's how they measure survival. Breast cancer is a relatively common disease. You have the MOST common type. Yours is not rare, it is like vanilla.... common. You have had a preliminary diagnosis. You will be having more testing, more facts will become known to you and your oncologist. Don't think about dying, you have got a big treatment in front of you. Plan on marching through that treatment like a warrior. No sniveling allowed! Ask questions of YOUR diagnosis. Don't go wandering on the internet and start reading horrible things about breast cancer that is NOT YOUR BREAST CANCER! Yours breast cancer is yours alone. Not all breast cancers are created equal. Treatment is designed for you only, because thankfully, they can target it for you. You have joined are ranks and there are thousands and thousands of us out here alive and well years after treatment. You will make it, you will live, be a tough cookie, now concentrate on your treatment and getting back to your normal life. Hang in there and take care, Sharon
    over 5 years Flag
    • Barbara Figueiredo Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Sharon, that made a lot of sense to me, makes me feel so much better,i was gonna post something to this but u answered it for me,,,thanks :)

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Sharon, thank you so much for your wonderful information. I have been on anastrozole for the last 4 1/2 yrs. They will probably add another 5 yrs of it. That is my only therapy. I've had neoadjuvent chemo, bilateral, radiation, hysterectomy as...

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      Sharon, thank you so much for your wonderful information. I have been on anastrozole for the last 4 1/2 yrs. They will probably add another 5 yrs of it. That is my only therapy. I've had neoadjuvent chemo, bilateral, radiation, hysterectomy as I am BRCA 1. The tumor was over 5 cm, no lymph nodes, no metasteses. But the surgeon did tell me that tumors of this size do seed the body. My oncologist is at MD Andersen and can't promise that this won't come back. She said, "after all you still had a 1.5 cm after chemo so you did not respond 100% to neoadjuvent". All very scary. There has never been any other treatment other than a chest xray once a year and being on anastrozole as the tumor was PR+. I am changing onco as I am moving in a week and she seems to be on the cutting edge. Does anyone still receive scans or treatment after the initial is over?

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Sharon, I just posted a long reply. Did not mean to send it anonymous. Did you receive it? Can you post it. I can't find it.

      Thanks, Sharon

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Oh, nevermind, I found it. Just learning how to navigate this website!

      over 5 years Flag
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Sharon Doria, I know you are scared. That's a normal feeling. Even tho your tumor was large, it didn't spread into the nodes or other organs. That's fantastic. Take comfort in that. After all treatment is done, scans are not protocol unless there...

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      Sharon Doria, I know you are scared. That's a normal feeling. Even tho your tumor was large, it didn't spread into the nodes or other organs. That's fantastic. Take comfort in that. After all treatment is done, scans are not protocol unless there is a problem. I'm 2 years out and have never had a scan of any kind. Well, except for the ultra sound that replaces my yearly mammogram. There isn't a guarantee for any of us that cancer won't come back. You've kicked cancers butt. Celebrate and live your life! Prayers to you.

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sharon Doria,
      I feel a bit bad now because I didn't know you have already been through treatment. The basic premise of my answer still stands. Don't live you life waiting for the next shoe to drop. You have received good care and it sounds like...

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      Sharon Doria,
      I feel a bit bad now because I didn't know you have already been through treatment. The basic premise of my answer still stands. Don't live you life waiting for the next shoe to drop. You have received good care and it sounds like you have done your homework regarding your oncologist after your move. Since I only had a single mastectomy, I still receive a mammogram each year. I have requested a yearly MRI of my chest but this is only giving me a false sense of security. My oncologist told me if this comes back, it won't be in my remaining breast, unfortunately, it will be in my bones, or organs. It wouldn't be in my best interest to radiate my body with scans to check for a cancer that "might" show up. Still, I don't fear the future, I embrace it and don't let cancer ruin any more of my days than it already has. My safeguard for my body is IF I have pain ... or some describable symptom that lasts more than two weeks, I get in to see my doctor. Most of my pain comes from trying to lift feed sacks or hay bales that are too heavy for me. (I have 7 horses) OR.... I am tired because I have filled my days with too many fun things. If I have a recurrence, I will deal with it but I have stifled the "What if?"
      My cancer was 2.3cm with 1 positive lymph node. It could get me down the road but while I am here and healthy, it's not going to mess with my life.
      So sorry, my answer missed the mark but my message is still the same. You have already passed some anniversary's and spent a lot of time worrying. As my oncologist said to me...."It's time for you to go on and live your life." Find a hobby or interest you are passionate about, don't be afraid to plan for the future, get out there and live! Take care, Sharon

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Thank you Sharon. I am a worrier...not a warrior. I wish I could change but the fact that the doctor's won't give me definite hope is discouraging and reminds me that I could have that pain that won't go away at any time. I wish I was...

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      Thank you Sharon. I am a worrier...not a warrior. I wish I could change but the fact that the doctor's won't give me definite hope is discouraging and reminds me that I could have that pain that won't go away at any time. I wish I was different. Hopefully the new oncologist will give me the positive insight I need to go forward with hope. You all have done that and I appreciate it more than I can say!

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sharon,
      I couldn't stand to have such a "downer" of an oncologist. One thing a patient can thrive on is hope. My internist was horrible, always looking around the corner for my coffin. My oncologist, on the other hand, always had an uplifting...

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      Sharon,
      I couldn't stand to have such a "downer" of an oncologist. One thing a patient can thrive on is hope. My internist was horrible, always looking around the corner for my coffin. My oncologist, on the other hand, always had an uplifting comment and words of encouragement. From the time we are born.... we are slowly dying. I just like to hear that I am not dying TODAY. You have to train yourself to change your outlook and hopefully, you next oncologist will have a "glass half full" outlook. It turns out my oncologist was right, all along. I, too, have lived a life of worry and the word "hypochondriac" comes to mind. Once I got cancer, my outlook changed because I had too much to live for. In your photograph, it looks like you have a LOT to live for! Hang in there, you have already lived 4.5 years. Manytimes, if your cancer is going to happen again, it would have already done so. This is up to you to shove those negative thoughts out of your head, nobody can do it for you. Hopefully the new oncologist will supply the hope you need. Take care, Sharon

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Hi Sharon, Just an update. My new oncologist said I was doing great and that I should enjoy my life! It was good to hear. I am coming up to 5 years on arimidex and reluctant to stop the drug. Onc says it keeps the cancer cells "asleep"
      I do...

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      Hi Sharon, Just an update. My new oncologist said I was doing great and that I should enjoy my life! It was good to hear. I am coming up to 5 years on arimidex and reluctant to stop the drug. Onc says it keeps the cancer cells "asleep"
      I do have osteoporosis but it seems to be stable.
      FYI, I love your posts on the ponies, cats, dogs, etc! on FB. You're a great lady!
      Thanks,
      Sharon

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Thank you Sharon! I completed 5 years on Letrozole which is in a similar family as Arimidex. That was two years ago. My oncologist said it had done the good it was supposed to do. The good had been reached. For me it was a matter of...

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      Thank you Sharon! I completed 5 years on Letrozole which is in a similar family as Arimidex. That was two years ago. My oncologist said it had done the good it was supposed to do. The good had been reached. For me it was a matter of osteoporosis and quality of life. I was still having horrendous hot flashes, once an hour so I was glad to quit. Some women's hormone treatments are going to 10 years and possibly beyond. They are making refinements to treatments all the time. When I went through treatment, I was the first one in my oncologists practice to benefit from a study completed showing my type of cancer didn't benefit from the additional 6 to 8 treatments of Taxol type of drug after the standard A/C treatments. I cried with joy when he said only 4 rounds of chemo. I was diagnosed at the end of September, had a mastectomy, no reconstruction, chemo. And was done Jan 4th. 5 years of Letrozole. I felt I got off frickin' lucky. I am so glad your doctor told you to enjoy your life. That is a huge mental boost. Really, it is their job to worry about our health. My doctor told me it was my job to go have fun and live my life. So Sharon.....that is exactly what we SHOULD DO! Take care darlin'. Sharon

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Thanks for your kind words! Did you also have IDC? I had the 4 rounds, but neoadjuvant chemo due to size of tumor.

      over 5 years Flag
  • Alison Soule Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2011
    Treatments are so successful these days and survival can't be determined by type or size of tumor anymore. It's common for women to beat the breast cancer whether it's stage I, I I, III, etc. Or if the tumor has certain characteristics. There's a treatment plan for every kind. Catching and treating it early is key. Best wishes
    over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      This was not an early catch. The tumor was over 5 cm, grade 3. Even though I was being watched by a breast specialist it grew to this monster within 1 year. Wish I could relax with it. Thanks

      over 5 years Flag
    • Alison Soule Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I understand your fear and anxiety. It's really scary. What's your treatment plan? We are here for you!!

      over 5 years Flag
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Hi Alison, My treatment plan is to be on anastrozole, probably for another 5 years. The occasional chest xray and periodic exams by my oncologist. What is yours? Thank you for your support!

      over 5 years Flag
    • Alison Soule Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had chemo, lumpectomy, radiation in 2011 and finished in 2012. I'm not on anything because my tumor was triple negative. Best of luck to you as you kick this thing's behind!!

      over 5 years Flag
  • anonymous Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2013
    Things are much better then years ago , I am just a year out but back to normal
    over 5 years Flag
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I was diagnosed stage 1c IDC and also had an area of DCIS, my doctors never gave me a survival rate just told me my prognosis was good with everything I did; unilateral mastectomy with all nodes negative, chemo, and rads.

      over 5 years Flag

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