loading... close

How do they determine if you need chemo after a mastectomy? I had a double and my sentinel node was benign, but I still have to see a medical oncologist.....am I not cancer-free after all this???

CB White Profile
Asked by

anonymous

Patient over 5 years
Topics
 
  • Marianne R. Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2011
    the med onc will help with that decision. Treatment is very individualized today. It will depend on your type of cancer, stage, and if you hormone + or - . I was stage 3 ILC er/pr+ with clear nodes I had 6 rounds of taxotere/Cytoxan, 35 radiation treatments, and now 5 years of tamoxifen. They are already saying 10 years of tamoxifen is possible. You will find everyone here has a different experience. I took everything they suggested for treatment others have turned down some or maybe all. It is truly a very personal decision but it is important to meet the med onc and see what the treatment plan is. If you still have questions about the validity of the plan get another opinion. I know it all sounds very overwhelming take someone with you to see the onc. I took my husband he asked as many questions as I did and he took great notes while I was emptying a box of Kleenex. I went home and processed the information with a bottle of wine and a box of Kleenex then saw another onc and he suggested the same course of action. God Bless your journey
    over 5 years Flag
    • Fats ferreira Profile
      anonimamente
      Membro da família ou uma pessoa querida

      Marianne, you also always answer most if not on all questions posted! Thanks for the great answers and honesty of your replies, I joined this "forum" in September, everyday I've checked in on questions and replies, you are all so inspiring, you...

      mais

      Marianne, you also always answer most if not on all questions posted! Thanks for the great answers and honesty of your replies, I joined this "forum" in September, everyday I've checked in on questions and replies, you are all so inspiring, you have all helped me through this, keep up the good work, I don't think you all realise that your posts are so helpful, informative! Keep up the great work! God Bless

      over 5 years Flag
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonimamente
      Sobrevivente desde 2011

      Thank you for the kind words. We have to support wach other. Paying it forward

      over 5 years Flag
  • André Roberts Profile
    anonimamente
    Stage 1 Paciente
    CB, Marianne is right about the type, and having the oncotype test. Not everyone has to have chemo, but look at it like this.......... If cancer was a bar of chocolate, and you put in in a pot of warm water (your body), then scoop the bar out (surgery). You can still have 'residue' (cancer cells) in the water. Chemo is the Dawn dish soap that's gonna get rid of it all ;) Now, if your Her2 positive, I've got an explanation for needing herceptin if you want to hear that one too. Prayers to you.
    over 5 years Flag
    • Fats ferreira Profile
      anonimamente
      Membro da família ou uma pessoa querida

      And here's my girl Andre, always knows exactly how to put it :-) In my moms case, tnbc, stage 1, sentinel node negative, after lumpectomy with good clean margins, all further tests, bone scans, ultrasounds, chest xrays, showed no evidence of...

      mais

      And here's my girl Andre, always knows exactly how to put it :-) In my moms case, tnbc, stage 1, sentinel node negative, after lumpectomy with good clean margins, all further tests, bone scans, ultrasounds, chest xrays, showed no evidence of disease, but as medical oncologist said, there could be 1 or two cells floating around, so it's moms "insurance" and best option especially with triple negative as there is nothing more they can do after rads! But everyone is different, each case is unique, just meet with your oncologist, and decide what is best for you! God Bless and all the best!

      over 5 years Flag
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonimamente
      Stage 1 Paciente

      Fats, thanks again for the nice comment. I just do my best to be of some help to someone else, as I have been helped by so many women here. Such a great sight.

      over 5 years Flag
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonimamente
      Stage 1 Paciente

      Haha, ok Gina....... If you are her2 positive, that means your cancer cells duplicate themselves very rapidly. Chemo alone can not kill the cancer cells, so you also need herceptin. The way it works is....... Think of the cancer cell as a peanut...

      mais

      Haha, ok Gina....... If you are her2 positive, that means your cancer cells duplicate themselves very rapidly. Chemo alone can not kill the cancer cells, so you also need herceptin. The way it works is....... Think of the cancer cell as a peanut M&M. The chemo comes along and eats all the chocolatey goodness, but it can't eat the peanut. Thats the only thing herceptin can eat. It finds all the peanuts and eats them. Yahoo, cancer cells gone! I thank God every day for this wonderful drug. It hasn't been around too long, and her2 positive women really didn't stand a good chance in this fight. I hope this helped you understand better - or just amused you ;) prayers to you.

      over 5 years Flag
  • Wanda S Profile
    anonimamente
    Stage 1 Paciente
    Marianne is correct. I am ER/PR positive and Her2 negative with clear nodes. I would have walked away with no chemo except my Oncotype score came in at 28....gray area, therefore chemo was suggested. 4 doses. Hugs
    over 5 years Comment Flag
  • Linda Green Profile
    anonimamente
    Paciente
    Same here. Onco test score was 6 after five years of Femara, but will prob be 10. See Onco doc every three months for first two years.
    over 5 years Comment Flag
  • Becky Lynn Profile
    anonimamente
    Stage 1 Paciente
    I didn't have chemo, but a medical oncologist will follow me for the rest of my treatment and check ups. I'll be taking Arimidex for 5or 10 years.
    over 5 years Flag
    • Gloria Rosario Profile
      anonimamente
      Aprendendo sobre o câncer de mama

      What stage were you? I'm a stage 2 grade 3b. They want me to so chemo and radiation for 16 weeks

      over 5 years Flag
    • Liz Banks Profile
      anonimamente
      Aprendendo sobre o câncer de mama

      I didn't want chemo or radiation. I have TNBC. It is genetic. My grandmother and my sisters had it. My older sister had chemo and radiation and lived 3 years and was bald and sick for 90 percent of it. Sh had no quality of life. It went the...

      mais

      I didn't want chemo or radiation. I have TNBC. It is genetic. My grandmother and my sisters had it. My older sister had chemo and radiation and lived 3 years and was bald and sick for 90 percent of it. Sh had no quality of life. It went the bones and she had a rid placed in the bone, she had lymphedema and then the cancer ate craters all over her body. I had a right mastectomy and 4 lymph nodes are removed. Cancer was in 3 of them. I am using some natural treatments/ therapies. I am one year since diagnosis. Blood work is clear and there are no signs of cancer. That doesn't mean it will not rear its ugly head. Prognosis for TNBC is survival of 3-5 years. If I live 2 years with quality if life, then I've had a better outcome than my sister

      4 months Flag
  • DeAwna McGinley Profile
    anonymous
    Patient
    I had the same situation, bilateral mastectomy with clean lymph nodes... Yes, your breast surgeon might tell you that you are 'cancer free' at this point, (which is so awesome by the way!!) but as Andre said, chemo is a great way to make sure there are no residual tiny cells lurking that may be too small for imaging to see. Your oncologist may want to do an oncotype test to determine if your type of cancer would even respond well to chemo(some types don't). My oncotype test came in with a score of 19 which was just barely intermediate, but being in that grey area combined with my age(32), my onco recommended doing chemo and I agreed.... Interesting side note: If you do need the oncotype test, I found through some researching (and it ended up true with my own case as well) that the grade of your tumor seems to frequently correlate with your oncotype score. In other words, my tumor was grade 2 (out of 1, 2 or 3), and my oncotype test came back intermediate (out of low, intermediate or high)... Unfortunately I can't remember where I read that, sorry, so it may not be true in every case, but it was true for me. Sending you good vibes for your meeting with your oncologist!!!!
    over 5 years Comment Flag

Educational Video

Personal Story

  • No related Story

Related Topics

    There are no topics for this question

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 2

Inspire hope by becoming an advocate for breast cancer prevention.

spread the word