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Why am I so tired even though I have not started chemo therapy yet?

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anonymous

Learning About Breast Cancer over 7 years
 
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    anonymous
    Survivor since 2012
    If you've had surgery, radiation, or both, you have the right, not to mention the stress and brain numbing diagnosis of cancer. :-D
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Sharon Danielson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2007
    I'm with Jo..... stress and some depression can suck a lot of energy away from you, quickly. Hang in there....its a rocky path but you will get through it. We all know how you are feeling.... take care, Sharon
    over 7 years Comment Flag
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    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    You are tired because this "stinks" honestly. You are probably still in the " this isn't happening to me phase". You have the right to feel however you want to get through this .
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • carol small Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    It is mentally exhausting to have been diagnosed with cancer. I just had BC come back after 18 years, and am now going through it again, and the tiredness and exhaustion after doing absolutely nothing was back. However, I tackle this with exercise. I exercise regularly anyway, and I know it sounds counterintutive that exercise will pep you up and take away being tired, but it does. So I recommend some gentle exercise, even just walking especially if you have a lovely place to walk and observe nature. Or if you have exercised before and have stopped, try resuming it. Make it not a choice, make it written in stone in your appointment book so that you cannot wiggle out of it. Like going to the dentist. I think you will start feeling much better.
    over 7 years Flag
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      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Carol. Im sorry to hear that your BC has returned. May I ask you if you took Tamoxifen after your first BC diagnosis? I am deliberating whether to take it but some say BC is more likely to return, although I believe it could still return with...

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      Hi Carol. Im sorry to hear that your BC has returned. May I ask you if you took Tamoxifen after your first BC diagnosis? I am deliberating whether to take it but some say BC is more likely to return, although I believe it could still return with the use of these drugs on occasion too. Thanks and good luck with everything xx

      over 7 years Flag
    • carol small Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I did not take tamoxifen. In 1994 Stage 0 and no lymph they thought I would skate with no chemo no radiation and no tamoxifen. Well, I did skate for 18 years. However, I did take Evista for my bones. After the STAR trial, I knew that Evista...

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      I did not take tamoxifen. In 1994 Stage 0 and no lymph they thought I would skate with no chemo no radiation and no tamoxifen. Well, I did skate for 18 years. However, I did take Evista for my bones. After the STAR trial, I knew that Evista was doing what tamoxifen would do. However, the Evista must have lost its power. The Arimidex seems to be shrinking the tumor that I can feel, and hopefully the ones in my liver and bones. I scanned in August for the liver tumor. If so I will take Arimidex for 5 years,and then they will have to decide what to do with me. I can always have chemo as I have never had it yet. But, they are saving that for when I need it. I think either tamoxifen or Evista are both good deals, and Arimidex a more powerful deal. The bad side effect of Arimidex is that it will cause osteoporosis, and I already have osteopenia. That's why only 5 years on it, my bones will be too brittle to use it any longer. But, I hae no symptoms, and continue my very physically active life as before. I'll deal with what comes when it comes. Thanks for asking.

      over 7 years Flag
    • carol small Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      oops I will be scanned, forgot the will...

      over 7 years Flag
  • Nancy Ries Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2011
    I think that as we get diagnosed our minds are working overtime with all of the possibilities, good and bad. I know that in the beginning I felt as though I was automatic and just moving through. The whole experience is overwhelming even with the support of family, friends and medical team. We are all on your side. Keep in touch.
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Emma Harvey Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    Hi! Im 37 and recently (5 weeks ago) had a small lumpectomy after BC diagnosis. I am a very strong and positive person and despite not letting the diagnosis get me down, it does give you an awful lot to think about, this alone can be tiring. Each appointment you will be given more information to digest and it can take it out of you. I underestimated healing time and thought id be back to work after 2 weeks, I am now feeling much better and am returning to most usual routines, but I still find i get more tired than usual and am trying to get back more exercise again. Just listen to your body at all times and don't punish yourself for feeling tired. Most of all, keep positive! All the best.
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Denise Hardnock Profile
    anonymous
    Learning About Breast Cancer
    My doctor told me that my immune system was under attack. This is clearly true. I am still experiencing extreme fatigue six months after my radiation. It is exhausting to maintain a full time job and deal with the heat. I am working to put exercise back into my routine.
    over 7 years Comment Flag
  • Alison Johnson Profile
    anonymous
    Survivor since 2009
    The two things I resisted the most, but that helped the most in the end were exercise and sleep medication. I set the following limits for myself. Two sleepless night in a row mean I would take Tylenol PM or Advil PM the third night. I felt as though I was continually trying to sleep without help, but not letting myself get so exhausted. I just hated that feeling in the morning when my eyes would open, but I was tired, tired, tired already. Eventually (2 years later) I sleep well almost every night without taking anything. I set a goal of 5 hours of exercise each week. Some weeks it was 15 minutes at a time, and some week I didn't get 5 hours. A weekly goal let me miss a day without feeling like a failure, and it let me start over every Sunday. After about 3 weeks on that plan, I had more energy. It had long term benefits too, I'm a three year survivor and I still aim for 5 hours per week of exercise. I dropped 15 pounds as well!
    over 7 years Comment Flag

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