loading... close

Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • tamara carr Profile

    I have been diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ, stage 1. What is the best course or treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hi Tamara,
      Your doctor will probably give you some options. One of my friends is going through treatment for this right now. She is pre-menopausal and has several spots showing up on her mammogram that turned out to be malignant. She was hoping she could have a lumpectomy but it was too...

      more

      Hi Tamara,
      Your doctor will probably give you some options. One of my friends is going through treatment for this right now. She is pre-menopausal and has several spots showing up on her mammogram that turned out to be malignant. She was hoping she could have a lumpectomy but it was too widespread. She had a mastectomy and will be having reconstruction, no chemo.
      Your treatment plan depends on a lot of things on a cellular level. No two women's treatment plans seem to be the same. The pathology may be similar, with the same overall diagnosis but the treatment plans depend on that microscopic detection. Good luck to you! Sharon

      Comment
    • Jodie Brummet Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed with DCIS stage 0 last year. I was able to have lumpectomy followed by radiation. I am premenopausal and take Tamoxifen. I also had negative genetic test. Ask many questions and you will find what is the best treatment path for you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Greetings , I have Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer estrogen/progestrone pos.HER-2neg withKi-67. How do you know if the cancer has spread to lymphatic areas and what are the chances of surviving this kind of diagnosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Jo is right.... you still don't have all the information you need to see the complete picture. For example...." Ki-67 is a cancer antigen that is found in growing, dividing cells but is absent in the resting phase of cell growth. This characteristic makes Ki-67 a good tumor marker." The lower...

      more

      Jo is right.... you still don't have all the information you need to see the complete picture. For example...." Ki-67 is a cancer antigen that is found in growing, dividing cells but is absent in the resting phase of cell growth. This characteristic makes Ki-67 a good tumor marker." The lower the number in a Ki-67, the better.
      As far as your diagnosis goes, I would call it so far, so good. I had the same findings and am still alive and healthy 5 years later. My initial diagnosis was 2-A and then they found microscopic cancer cells in 1-5 nodes. Staging when to a 2-B. I chose to have a mastectomy and then 4 rounds of chemo. I am just finishing the 5 years of hormone blocking drug "Femara". (I could have had a lumpectomy)
      You are still in the diagnosis phase and need a few more pieces of the puzzle. Your doctor may request an OncoDX test which is a predictor of possible future reoccurrence. It is also a way to decide if you will need chemotherapy. Please keep us posted. Hang in there.... take care, Sharon
      PS.... I detest talking survivor predictions.... tests can only go so far. Each and every woman is an individual. Some pretty tough diagnosis's come out of this by living long lives! As many women say, we don't have an expiration date! Don't put mental limitations on yourself by trying to dig around for cold statistics. We are better and stronger than that!!! You ARE a warrior!

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Your staging is incomplete until sentinel nodes are biopsied. Sounds like you haven't had surgery. Hopefully you asked these questions to your surgeon. Be aggressive with those.

      3 comments
  • sonali Singh Profile

    Is chimo second session same as 1st

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everything should be the same unless your doctor decided to add something different. Mine elected for me not to take steroids the day before and after chemo. just the one I got in my IV. For my 3rd and 4th she prescribed some for me to take the day prior and after +the one in the IV on the day of.

      1 comment
    • Betsy V Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      you will notice more the side effects of the chemo.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Once removed does a lymph node grow back?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      I don't believe they grow back, but often the lymph finds other paths to move through the body. It's pretty impossible for surgeons to remove every lymph node in an area so you usually have some left to do the work. I got this info from my lymphedema PT.

      2 comments
    • Mimi Carroll Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Nope, they don't grow back. We do have others . I had 13 out in February and I am doing fine. I get massages and do exercises to help the fluid go to other nodes. Two best lymph exercises- jump on trampoline or rebounder and when sitting flex your foot up and down.
      I wear a compression...

      more

      Nope, they don't grow back. We do have others . I had 13 out in February and I am doing fine. I get massages and do exercises to help the fluid go to other nodes. Two best lymph exercises- jump on trampoline or rebounder and when sitting flex your foot up and down.
      I wear a compression sleeve my dic gave when doing lifting and will for flying.

      3 comments

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word