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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Tom Schink Profile

    My mom just got diagnosed with breast cancer (early Stage 2) and is extremely worried that she will lose her job. First, what's the likelihood of that and second, how can I try to calm this fear?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has...

      more

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has to take off work for treatment. She should also inquire about any disability benefits her employer might offer. Best wishes to you and your Mom

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably ...

      more

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably deeper fears under this one about work. Not that you need to pry them outta her, but remind her she needs to take care of herself, that you're there to listen, and that you'll take her to anyone else she wants to talk to, including a support group.
      Best wishes.

      Comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    will invasive lobular carcinoma remove the whole breast?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 2 years 3 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My mass was 7.3 (about the size of a hard baseball) I lost the top half of my right breast.

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Not necessarily... There are a lot of factors involved... Stage, grade, size of the tumor, etc.

      Comment
  • Lori Schanche Profile

    How is weight gain associated with Femara?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 2 answers
    • rebekah alkhalifa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it...

      more

      rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com
      Hello...
      I wish you best Compliment of the season,with hope that you are physically and healthly alright,l do believe that this mail will reach in good condition. My name is Rebekah i saw your profile in www.beyondtheshock.com and admire it, i think we can make it together, please i would like you to contact me through my email address:( rebekahalkhalifa@yahoo.com ) i will tell you more about myself, also send you my photo,as soon as you contact me back, hopping for your lovely reply soonest,
      Rebekah....

      Comment
    • Connie Herrick Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I am having problems with belly fat, not necessarily weight gain.

      Comment

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