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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Alysa Fields Profile

    Is 1.6 centimeters considered large for a breast lump?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 4 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That's the reason I ended up doing an MRI as there was a discrepency between the screening mammo, the additional views, and the U/S and they wanted to determine the size before doing anything else.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      There is a lot more than just size that is important. The type of breast cancer, how aggressive the cancer is (grade) whether it is reactive to hormones and how many positive lymph nodes are involved. My friend had a huge tumor but it was non-aggressive. So size isn't everything for sure in...

      more

      There is a lot more than just size that is important. The type of breast cancer, how aggressive the cancer is (grade) whether it is reactive to hormones and how many positive lymph nodes are involved. My friend had a huge tumor but it was non-aggressive. So size isn't everything for sure in breast cancer. Mine was 2.2 cm,
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I was just diagnosed with invasive lobular carcinoma grade 2. Anyone out there with same situation? I am leaning towards lumpectomy, but wondering if it is the right way to go?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 5 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I opted for a bi lateral mastectomy, it gave me more peace of mind and I am glad I did it.

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      It would depend on so many different things. You mentioned your tumor is grade 2. Do you know what stage you are? Are you HER2 - or ? BRACA? What do your other tests results say?

      1 comment
  • Kreesha Kuru Profile

    What are the symptoms of breast cancer ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      It's very hard to define symptoms for breast cancer. Everyone is different. Some women do not have any noticeable symptoms. Others notice a lump or a discharge from the nipple.

      The safest course is to have your yearly exames, Know your own body, and know your family history. If you have...

      more

      It's very hard to define symptoms for breast cancer. Everyone is different. Some women do not have any noticeable symptoms. Others notice a lump or a discharge from the nipple.

      The safest course is to have your yearly exames, Know your own body, and know your family history. If you have concerns, discuss them with your doctor right away.

      4 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Patient

      I also had bad night sweats. I could sleep naked w no sheets and still b drenched

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone been treated with Neupogen or Neulasta to help increase the absolute neutrophil count when on Taxol or Carboplatin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I received them too, and they really caused my bones to ache. My oncologist told me to take Claritin the morning of the shot to reduce the pain. I was very surprised to find that it worked.

      Comment
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I got the neulasta shot after my first 3 A/C treatments. I was able to skip the last shot for treatment #4 of A/C and I didn't need it for my 4 taxol treatments.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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