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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Lisa Majka  Profile

    How many types of Breast Cancers are there? I'm also wondering if Inflammatory Breast Cancer is the worst one you can get?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      You also wanted to know how many types of breast cancer...Types of Breast Cancer

      Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS)
      DCIS is a type of early breast cancer confined to the inside of the ductal system.

      Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC)
      IDC is the most common type of breast cancer representing 78%...

      more

      You also wanted to know how many types of breast cancer...Types of Breast Cancer

      Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS)
      DCIS is a type of early breast cancer confined to the inside of the ductal system.

      Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC)
      IDC is the most common type of breast cancer representing 78% of all malignancies. These lesions appear as stellate (star like) or well-circumscribed (rounded) areas on mammograms. The stellate lesions generally have a poorer prognosis.

      Medullary Carcinoma
      Medullary carcinoma accounts for 15% of all breast cancer types. It most frequently occurs in women in their late 40s and 50s, presenting with cells that resemble the medulla (gray matter) of the brain.

      Infiltrating Lobular Carcinoma (ILC)
      Infiltrating lobular carcinoma is a type of breast cancer that usually appears as a subtle thickening in the upper-outer quadrant of the breast. This breast cancer type represents 5% of all diagnosis. Often positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors, these tumors respond well to hormone therapy.

      Tubular Carcinoma
      Making up about 2% of all breast cancer diagnosis, tubular carcinoma cells have a distinctive tubular structure when viewed under a microscope. Typically this type of breast cancer is found in women aged 50 and above. It has an excellent 10-year survival rate of 95%.

      Mucinous Carcinoma (Colloid)
      Mucinous carcinoma represents approximately 1% to 2% of all breast carcinoma. This type of breast cancer's main differentiating features are mucus production and cells that are poorly defined. It also has a favorable prognosis in most cases.

      Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC)
      Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare and very aggressive type of breast cancer that causes the lymph vessels in the skin of the breast to become blocked. This type of breast cancer is called "inflammatory" because the breast often looks swollen and red, or "inflamed". IBC accounts for 1% to 5% of all breast cancer cases in the United States.
      Learn more

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Any type of breast cancer has the chances of containing aggressive cells. When diagnosed with breast cancer, there is the ability to look at individual cells and grade them for their aggressiveness. So many factors go into staging and grading breast cancer and then the treatment is...

      more

      Any type of breast cancer has the chances of containing aggressive cells. When diagnosed with breast cancer, there is the ability to look at individual cells and grade them for their aggressiveness. So many factors go into staging and grading breast cancer and then the treatment is individualized for the patient. Inflammatory breast cancer has the chances of being one of the more aggressive types but it is also one of the more rare diagnosed.

      Comment
  • A Sky Profile

    Anyone had bi-lateral mastectomy with immediate reconstruction? How long did it take to recover? I'm 4 weeks post-op. Still painful. Doc still has to drain fluid. Can't drive. Feel like it's taking me too long to get better.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    almost 5 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • A Sky Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Argh. I hid send too soon. I had the 650cc silicone I,

      Comment
    • laura  bailey Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi you are right on track. The other ladies have great advise. You have been through a LOT, give yourself a break. This is not something you recover from in a few days. But, you will be feeling better and better gradually. Happy Thoughts! Laura

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    my grandmother past away from breast cancer am i at high risk my grand mother was my moms mom

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 2 answers
    • jennifer lewis Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      You are probably at higher risk than someone who has zero family history. That wasn't my case though. No history for me, I still got it. Just be vigilant about changes or unusual things going on with your body. Go to the dr for regular exams. But don't live in fear that you may get it. God bless.

      Comment
    • B R Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I agree with Jennifer. Cancer is sneaky though. My maternal grandmother had breast cancer in her late 70's. I was diagnosed at 52 with it. Be diligent with self exams and mammos and report any changes you notice to your MD.

      Comment
  • hithere hithere Profile

    How old do you have to be to see an oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      How old are you?

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It isn't about age it is about need. I needed mine onc at 58.

      Comment

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