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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Can a person still have get cancer in there lymph nodes under the under arms after a mastectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Dear Norma,
      Yes. I had 5 sentinel nodes removed but the surgeon warned me there was a small chance I could have cancer cells in any of my axillary nodes. Again the chance was very small. Since I am 5 years out now, I am fairly sure they were ok since I have not had a recurrance. Every time I...

      more

      Dear Norma,
      Yes. I had 5 sentinel nodes removed but the surgeon warned me there was a small chance I could have cancer cells in any of my axillary nodes. Again the chance was very small. Since I am 5 years out now, I am fairly sure they were ok since I have not had a recurrance. Every time I have gone to my oncologist or internist, they have always checked my axillary lymph nodes for any swelling. Breast cancer is so very sneaky, I would not be surprised for it to raise its ugly head somewhere, sometime in my life. Arrrgh. God willing, I hope not. God's blessings to you, take care, Norma, Sharon

      1 comment
    • vicki e Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      I had a mastectomy five years ago and hada recurrence in my lymph nodes this past February so the short answer is yes . Unfortunately.

      3 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    my mom was clinically diagnose with stage 4 breast cancer at the age of 79 now 83 y.o.she is diabetic. want to know how to clean her open wound.i want to send a recent photo of her breast.how can i send?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Her doctor or his nurse should be telling you how to clean the wound. God bless her and you.

      Comment
    • joan jones Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      Absolutely call your Mom's medical team. They should assess her wound , make a treatment plan and if family is not comfortable with the wound care they should make a referral for a visiting nurse to come into see your Mom and do the dressing changes ordered .
      Don't feel bad asking for help -...

      more

      Absolutely call your Mom's medical team. They should assess her wound , make a treatment plan and if family is not comfortable with the wound care they should make a referral for a visiting nurse to come into see your Mom and do the dressing changes ordered .
      Don't feel bad asking for help - that is why they are there .

      Sorry this has happened but there is help available~- for you and your Mom .You do not have to do this alone .
      Please make that call and best wishes to you and your Mom for strength and healing .

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the survival rate for stage 4 Inflammatory breast Cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      As I've said to everyone else who asks this question and I'm not trying to be rude; only God knows when each of us will join him in heaven.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      This is the way look at it this way......1.I've made it very clear what I want to happen 2. Stay goodwith God 3.( this is the biggy) live my best life every momdnt of every day. 4.when they call the hopice in I will not have any regrets.

      Comment
  • Linda Lewis Profile

    can you take black cohosh complex estrogen free if you have had breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I wouldn't take anything unless I got the okay from all my doctors.

      Comment
    • Rita Jo Hayes Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      My Ono doc did not want me taking anything unless he ok'd it. Better be safe and ask. Good luck.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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