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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    How fast does breast cancer spread?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 1 answer
    • Omar Hinojosa Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It all depends on the stage and type of breast cancer you have. My mother was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer and is still here after 10 years. The answer is no one knows, but it can spread rapidly if not treated properly

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    85 years old just diagnosed, do I go through treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 2 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is so difficult to answer because we are all different and realize there are many different types of breast cancer. The woman who stated she was 65 and had inflammatory breast cancer..... that type of cancer is extremely aggressive and the treatment is also extreme or else you are dead.
      I...

      more

      This is so difficult to answer because we are all different and realize there are many different types of breast cancer. The woman who stated she was 65 and had inflammatory breast cancer..... that type of cancer is extremely aggressive and the treatment is also extreme or else you are dead.
      I had Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer and was diagnosed at 59. It was a rather aggressive form. I chose to have a mastectomy but I could have chosen a lumpectomy. Because I chose mastectomy, I didn't have to have 6 weeks of radiation. I had 4 rounds of chemo. and 5 years of taking a daily pill. I felt the treatment was reasonable and not terrible. I am 7 years out from my treatment and except for missing a breast, I am absolutely healthy and enjoying my life.
      You need to talk to your oncologist and see what treatment would be for your case. My neighbor who is in her late 70's had a later stage breast cancer and is taking a hormone blocking drug. While it did not get rid of her cancer, it stopped it from progressing.
      There are usually different ways of treating breast cancer but it depends on your individual type of breast cancer, the stage, and how aggressive it is. Just as we are all different.... so are our breast cancers. You need more information. Take along a family member, or good friend to take notes and hear what the oncologist has to say.
      We do care about our "sisters" and please keep in touch with us. Best to you, Sharon

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I think a lot would depend on your general health and the type and stage of cancer. My mother , also in her 80's, had a lumpectomy and radiation twice a day for five days. But, this was for stage 0 breast cancer. She tolerated that treatment well.

      Comment
  • Ali S Profile
  • Sarah Hailes Profile

    I have burning pain on the side I had my lymphectomy. I am several months post op and three weeks post chemo. Is this normal? I just assumed it was and never asked. Now I'm wondering if I'm wrong.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 3 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sarah,
      I agree with Norma, call your doctor to check this out.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Scar tissue can be tight and burn. Nerves heal and find new paths. It is imperative to stretch and keep the muscles supple. I skipped a month and am having to stretch out again. If you're worried call the doctor.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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