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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile

    How do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 1996
    about 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 1996

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered...

      more

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered with simple words. What I wanted them to understand was that I was very sick, that I was fighting hard and that there was a pretty good chance that I would win the battle. I tried to give a message of hope. 15 years later, we talk about it and they say they appreciated understanding progressively.

      1 comment
    • Elise Merchant Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me...

      more

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me straight out that it was and that she was going to be fine :)

      1 comment
  • Angela Kroninger Profile

    My aunt recently got diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. What does this entail and how can I help her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Nancy Collins Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2002

      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or...

      more

      I was diagnosed with Stage III Invasive Lobular BC at 43. She'll have (I opted for mastectomy(ies), to take away as many chances as I could that it would come back, surgery, chemo and radiation. For me the hardest part was losing my hair. Be sure she finds a wig before starting chemo, or bandanas. I hated a wig, but I was going through chemo and radiation during the hottest part of the summer, so I wore bandanas. Just be there for her, tell her if she needs anything to let you know. We need to be as independent as we can, so someone hovering over us (me and the people I've met along the way have felt this way) isn't good. If she wants to talk, listen, but let her bring up the topic of cancer. Try to treat her like you would before her diagnosis, which I know is hard. You feel so helpless, but you just being there for her, is the great gift you can give her. She'll go through a lot of emotions, which she may or may not show around you, but PLEASE never take it personal if she gets snappy. Not only are we scared, but our bodies are going through some major changes. She's lucky to have you!!!

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special...

      more

      When I had the same type of breast cancer, I was living in an isolated rural area. My neighbour was wonderful. I hardly knew her, but she began leaving little packages of home-grown veggies at my door. A friend who lived 2 hours away made several trips to visit and she brought some special yogurt that had extra "healthy bacteria", because I had thrush from the chemo. Another friend who was too far away to visit, sent me a little figurine of one woman with her arm around another. Another friend from my church sent me a greeting card every week to cheer me. My pals from work brought me a gift basket with cozy pajamas, a fluffy throw, and some bath stuff. These are the things that mattered most to me when I was "going through the fire".

      You could make up some meals and freeze them for her. I could only eat soft food for a while so noodle casseroles or soups might be good. If she needs help with housework you could organize a cleaning bee. Most of all, just be there for her without smothering.

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment
  • Ally Chapis  Profile

    How do I try to cheer my mom up during treatment? What can I do to make her feel better?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the...

      more

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the dishes, keep her paperwork organized, keep myself educated on her medications so I know what to expect, keep a log of when she has taken medication and when she has eaten (this helps to know when she can take another dose & whatnot), I act as sort of an eager slave to get her water or food or whatever she might want, & I try to make her laugh. I also let her cry & complain without always trying to cheer her up. She needs to get that sadness/pain/frustration out & I don't want her to feel she can't. I validate her feelings & then offer whatever love & support I can. All of this is also a huge help to her fiancé (if your father is also in the house). When he comes home from work, I encourage him to take some time to himself before taking over caring for my friend. And I know helping out around the house really helps relieve stress for him. He also reads to her every night. Which is something anyone can do.

      All of the answers given cover it...just being there makes a huge difference. But I thought I'd offer some ideas of what I've done. :-) My best to you & your family.

      Comment
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom is still going through her treatments and I did her wash, made food and she stayed with me after her surgery.

      Comment

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