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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My recently diagnosed 40yr old sister-in-law doesn't want my help. We live 30 miles away and only see her a few times a year. Her church and neighbors are supportive. Any suggestions on how to be there for her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people...

      more

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people comforted me in many ways. My sisters who lived out of town, checked in with me weekly by phone or email, they sent care packages during the weeks I had chemotherapy with books, warm fuzzy socks, and sometimes sent flowers. My friends were determined to cook for me, but I was dreading being bombarded with visitors when I felt miserable. So I placed a cooler outside my door and they all took turns delivering food for my family when I could not function. One place I looked forward to having visitors was the chemotherapy room because I needed to sit there for a few hours and I was usually feeling quite well on those days. Some friends and family also drove me to radiation as it was an hours drive away. And then there were cards and notes in the mail that to this day I still read as I look back on how people helped me when I never wanted help, but that is what got me through the most difficult time in my life. I am thankful that so many people found a way to care. My thoughts are with you and your sister- in-law and I know you will find your own way to help her. Take care!

      Comment
    • Jennifer Jackson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with all of the above. Never underestimate the power of prayer. I recently experienced a very bad cancer scare, and felt comforted through the prayers of others.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My first treatment was Wednesday and so far so good. (no sickness or anything) Thank you god. I'm praying the next treatments go good too. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy...

      more

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy and tired and queasy but not enough to make me sick or keep me from doing what I usually do. Hope you're still feeling well!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope...

      more

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope you will share the positive stories of chemotherapy with anyone who is having that type of treatment. You just don't know how anyone is going to react to that stuff. Continued good luck to you. God's blessings..... Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    WHAT CANCER CANNOT DO: Cancer is so limited...It cannot cripple love. It cannot shatter hope. It cannot corrode faith. It cannot destroy peace. It cannot kill friendship. It cannot suppress memories. It cannot silence courage.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      That's awesome Norma, thanks so much for sharing. Very encouraging!

      1 comment
    • Renee' OK Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I love this. Thanks for sharing.

      1 comment
  • Rachael Leslie Profile

    My girlfriend was diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday. The appointment with the surgeon is next week to get specific answers. I want to do anything and everything I can to help her through this. Any advice is very much needed and appreciated!

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your...

      more

      Rachael,
      How wonderful your dear friend has you standing by her side. She is probably going through the depths of the most terrifying hell right now. I agree with what Anne Marie has said. When I was diagnosed, my friends left me.... which was a horrendous shock. What she will need is your support. Go with her to her appointments.... the diagnostic ones will be particularly important. She will need someone to --take notes-- as she will never be able to remember most of what is being said. This is a step by step process. Try to keep her from going to the really dark side. There are a ton of positive stories and outcomes to this lousy diagnosis. We, here, are living proof. Some of the journey's have been very tough but these strong women are here to share their struggles and outcomes. You are a dear friend to want to help her through this battle. Please stay in touch with us, we are here to help you and her along her path. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because...

      more

      My heart goes out to you and your girlfriend cancer affects not only the patient but the loved ones also. The best thing you can do for your girlfriend is to be at her side offer to go to all her doctor appts with her be her second set of ears ask those questions that she forgot to ask because when you are with the doctor we patients go blank I don't know how many times I was going to ask this that or the other thing and get into the office and I go blank my husband would just chime in for me Be patient with your girlfriend she will be on a whirlwind of emotions. Hold her tell her it's okay to talk about it all with you let her know your feelings also. My husband and I held each other up luckily one was always stronger then the other on those bad days. I have a link on my profile to my story of my personal experience with breast cancer in 2003. I take you from the initial diagnosis the biopsy surgery and recovery with a reflection a year later. Even though my type of breast cancer or choice of treatment may be different I hope by sharing my experience it will help other women and there family. http://home.roadrunner.com/~amj/

      Comment

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