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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My good friend has just been diagnosed with breast cancer. What can I do or say to help her through this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Francine Williams Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile...

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      Hello my name is Francine and I was where ur friend is now all I wanted to here was that my family/friends were goin to be there for me every step of the way !!Assure ur friend that GoD Makes no Mistakes and there's a million and one prayers goin her way!!Take care and remember to always smile that is one thing Cancer can't take from u

      2 comments
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of...

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      Be there as often as you can. I remember it getting hard when ppl kept asking "how are you feeling?". Bc if I was honest I would have said I feel like crap, I'm scared, I feel sick, I'm afraid of dying, etc. So, get in the habit of saying: I hope you're feeling well today, or I was thinking of you today. Also, don't say "let me know if there's something I can do" bc it puts the burden back on her and it's so hard to ask for help. Instead, ask when her appointments are and plan to go with her (if she has no one else that can go), stop by (call or text first) with a meal when she's sick from chemo and clean up a little while you're there. Bring funny movies or books ('the sh*t my dad says' is hilarious--someone gave it to me), bring gossip, distractions are good. Try not to probe by asking a ton of questions all the time, but let her know you're always there to listen. She'll start to open up when she wants. If she's sad, let her be. Be comforting but don't give advice. (like empathize and say you know it must be hard and scary, but don't say things like, look for the silver linking, or try to be positive...some days, she'll just be sad and angry will need a shoulder to cry on)

      When she's feeling well, keep her busy! If you aren't always free, create a calendar for friends/colleagues that can cook, visit, take her out, etc.

      If she plans on wearing a wig, offer to go with her to pick it out before her hair falls out. Then, when it starts to fall out, offer to shave it (my friend gave me a Mohawk).

      When her treatments are over, months from now, keep checking in...that's a tough time emotionally, even when hair starts to grow back. Breast cancer is life changing and we still think about it even post treatment.

      Of course, you can't do it all, but get your friends together to help with all of this.

      I've truly seen who my true friends are with how they've dealt with my diagnosis. I'm young(32), and I've read and agree that breast cancer is lonely for young women bc most of our peers have no idea what it's like. If your friend is young, help her check out programs for young women with BC

      best wishes

      Comment
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Any ideas on how to tell my 10 year old daughter I have breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I have a 10 year old and year old. I just told both kids one month ago. I told them when I knew I would not be hysterical about it. It is all in your delivery. My kids have been fine.

      Comment
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also...

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      Nikol,

      Be strong, but be honest. Most experts advise that you talk to your child about the cancer as soon as you are able to manage your own emotions. You do not have to hide your emotions, but be sure to wait until you can focus on the needs of your children and not your own.

      It might also be helpful to come up with an outline of topics that you want to cover, because your talk with your daughter will likely become emotional and you may forget what you wanted to say.

      Here is a link to a short article in Parents that may be helpful: http://www.parents.com/parenting/moms/healthy-mom/6-ways-to-tell-your-kids-about-breast-cancer/

      Also, remember that you are not alone. Not too long ago, on this site, someone else asked the question "How do I tell my kids". Click on this question and you can see some suggestions from women who have also had to do this: http://beyondtheshock.com/questions/561

      I am so sorry to hear about your diagnosis, but am wishing you the best. Stay strong and keep hope!

      Comment
  • Traciann brundage Profile

    You guys would be so proud of me . I told a family member it was mine and my husbands choice on treatment and they could know when I wanted to tell them . I don't really stand up for my self very often so this great . Had to share a success.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Traciann,
      Sometimes breast cancer brings with it some blessings. For you, it has brought out that inner courage that was probably already there. You are already showing you are up for the fight. You are a strong woman, and will win this battle. Good for you, Traciann. You will be ok. ...

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      Traciann,
      Sometimes breast cancer brings with it some blessings. For you, it has brought out that inner courage that was probably already there. You are already showing you are up for the fight. You are a strong woman, and will win this battle. Good for you, Traciann. You will be ok. Wishing you more strength and courage! Atta Girl! Blessings, Sharon

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      This is your journey! Share what you want with who you want when you want. It gets easier to share what's going on as your treatment plan is laid out. For me I'm glad I shared what is going on ( once I was ready to) because its been nice to have the support and encouragement and help from them....

      more

      This is your journey! Share what you want with who you want when you want. It gets easier to share what's going on as your treatment plan is laid out. For me I'm glad I shared what is going on ( once I was ready to) because its been nice to have the support and encouragement and help from them. Best of luck! ☺Julie

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment

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