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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My recently diagnosed 40yr old sister-in-law doesn't want my help. We live 30 miles away and only see her a few times a year. Her church and neighbors are supportive. Any suggestions on how to be there for her?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betsy Chapin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people...

      more

      How to help? One thing about breast cancer is that it can be a long process between surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I know when I was going through treatment, I didn't want help either and I didn't want people hovering over me because I was determined not to be a patient. However people comforted me in many ways. My sisters who lived out of town, checked in with me weekly by phone or email, they sent care packages during the weeks I had chemotherapy with books, warm fuzzy socks, and sometimes sent flowers. My friends were determined to cook for me, but I was dreading being bombarded with visitors when I felt miserable. So I placed a cooler outside my door and they all took turns delivering food for my family when I could not function. One place I looked forward to having visitors was the chemotherapy room because I needed to sit there for a few hours and I was usually feeling quite well on those days. Some friends and family also drove me to radiation as it was an hours drive away. And then there were cards and notes in the mail that to this day I still read as I look back on how people helped me when I never wanted help, but that is what got me through the most difficult time in my life. I am thankful that so many people found a way to care. My thoughts are with you and your sister- in-law and I know you will find your own way to help her. Take care!

      Comment
    • Jennifer Jackson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with all of the above. Never underestimate the power of prayer. I recently experienced a very bad cancer scare, and felt comforted through the prayers of others.

      Comment
  • Ali S Profile

    How do I go about telling someone, that I'm newly dating, that I was getting breast cancer treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Brooke Lancaster Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done...

      more

      I'm curious on this question too. I am 33 and single. I would love to be able to date again, but I am afraid to talk about my Breast Cancer with a future suitor. I think with me it's a physical insecurity I'm going thru right now. I'm almost done with chemo, so I keep telling myself once I'm done with treatment and dell like myself again.

      For you, wait to talk about it for when you feel the most comfortable. I'm sure he will be there for you thru this time. What treatment are you going thru at this time? Best wishes.

      Brooke

      3 comments
  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • Ally Chapis  Profile

    How do I try to cheer my mom up during treatment? What can I do to make her feel better?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 8 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the...

      more

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the dishes, keep her paperwork organized, keep myself educated on her medications so I know what to expect, keep a log of when she has taken medication and when she has eaten (this helps to know when she can take another dose & whatnot), I act as sort of an eager slave to get her water or food or whatever she might want, & I try to make her laugh. I also let her cry & complain without always trying to cheer her up. She needs to get that sadness/pain/frustration out & I don't want her to feel she can't. I validate her feelings & then offer whatever love & support I can. All of this is also a huge help to her fiancé (if your father is also in the house). When he comes home from work, I encourage him to take some time to himself before taking over caring for my friend. And I know helping out around the house really helps relieve stress for him. He also reads to her every night. Which is something anyone can do.

      All of the answers given cover it...just being there makes a huge difference. But I thought I'd offer some ideas of what I've done. :-) My best to you & your family.

      Comment
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom is still going through her treatments and I did her wash, made food and she stayed with me after her surgery.

      Comment

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