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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there a way to manage the shock I am having from the diagnosis of breast cancer a week ago?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • P C Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      Hello,

      I am newly diagnosed with DCIS. I fully understand how you feel right about now. I put this situation into God's hands. I educated myself about my diagnosis and I feel much better than I did at first. Just take it one day at a time. Find people you can confide in too. Stay active...

      more

      Hello,

      I am newly diagnosed with DCIS. I fully understand how you feel right about now. I put this situation into God's hands. I educated myself about my diagnosis and I feel much better than I did at first. Just take it one day at a time. Find people you can confide in too. Stay active and I know this part is hard, but stay busy. I have found when I stay busy I do not think about it as much. My MRI and surgery is next week (just days away) then radiation treatments. The hardest part thus far for me is the waiting. If that is where you are, just hang on. We are all in this journey together. God be with you, P Carter

      15 comments
    • Charlie Hansen Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I can only tell you what we've been able to do. We cried a lot than figured we have to do this so we have become educated as much as we can. Talk about it to those close to you. For us, our faith plays a major role also. God bless you.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there a spot in your site for mothers who lost her daughter to breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      So sorry about your daughter! I would recommend you visit our online support community at www.MyNBCF.org, it is an amazing support community of breast cancer survivors, friends and family.

      Comment
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Also, we have a list of support resources at http://breastcan.cr/fZQzP6.

      Comment
  • ann c Profile

    My sister will start her first chemo next week, what help you think she needs the most besides taking care of her 6 yr old girl?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I had my first treatment two weeks ago. My sister has been a rock star... Drover to chemo, took me to store, picked up my scripts, took me for my neulesta shot, brought me food, made sure I took my meds on time, told me jokes, etc! I will never be able to tell her how much I appreciate her...

      more

      I had my first treatment two weeks ago. My sister has been a rock star... Drover to chemo, took me to store, picked up my scripts, took me for my neulesta shot, brought me food, made sure I took my meds on time, told me jokes, etc! I will never be able to tell her how much I appreciate her support!

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Sorry...hit return... Anyway, I was hungry but couldn't bear to cook. It was one huge thing at a tough time of day that helped more than I anticipated. I have two little kids myself, so I think meals may help your sister! Good luck.

      Comment
  • Hannah B Profile

    What is the risk of me developing breast cancer if my mom had it twice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Amanda Metivier Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You both should be tested for the Brca gene. Your chances are much higher if it's genetic. If not it's the same as anyone else.

      Comment
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I also suggest looking into genetic testing. There are other factors to consider, as well. Such as your Mother's age when she was first diagnosed & what type of cancer she had. If she was younger than 40 and/or had triple negative breast cancer, I HIGHLY recommend getting the BRCA test. And...

      more

      I also suggest looking into genetic testing. There are other factors to consider, as well. Such as your Mother's age when she was first diagnosed & what type of cancer she had. If she was younger than 40 and/or had triple negative breast cancer, I HIGHLY recommend getting the BRCA test. And because of your mother's diagnoses, your insurance should approve the testing. Especially if anyone else on your mother's side of the family have had breast or ovarian cancer. Good luck!

      Comment

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