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Conclusion

 
Conclusion

Chapter: 7 - Conclusion

Subchapter: 1 - Conclusion

The first step down this new road is learning about your diagnosis and treatment options, which you have done by watching Beyond the Shock®. Embarking on this journey requires you to not only be informed, but also to realize that you don’t have to face this alone.

Family, friends, and other breast cancer patients are your shield and safety net, carefully knit together to strengthen you. Alongside them, your triumphs over new hills will be celebrated; your struggles through new valleys endured. They can help you see past the shadows, reminding you that each step–each moment–is precious. Leaning on them for emotional and physical needs isn’t a sign of weakness, but rather a kind of healing for you and for them.

Beyond the Shock® is more than just videos; it is an online community of women around the world who are wrestling with similar emotions, questions, decisions, experiences, and fears.
You can ask questions and give answers. You can watch stories of hope and share your own.

Beyond the shock of breast cancer, there is still life.

Related Questions

  • Sara Palmer Profile

    My sister was diagnosed with Stage 2 triple negative breast cancer. We live in different states at the moment, but what can I do to help and support her through her treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would recommend sending lots of cards.
      A friend of mine gave me a small gift after every procedure. This was something nice to look forward to each time. Call her often, listen to her fears and worries. It is a rough road but she will remember the sweet touches.

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. ...

      more

      Tell her not to google triple negative. The info is outdated and scared me!!! I'm through 2/3 of my treatment and the little triple negative jerk is gone, chemo works well with it!

      Send her cards each week or more often and write personal messages that you love her, youre thinking of her, etc. also, little gifts help--like send her something each week or every 2 weeks or something. Comedy books (Tina fey's bossypants was funny, also the S*%! My dad says helped me when I couldn't sleep. Assuming she's having chemo, send her a few scarves and/or hats. Maybe a thin hat for sleeping.

      Gossip, jokes, all that helps too. Don't make every correspondence about cancer bc she wants to feel normal too.

      See if you can help set up a meal calendar among her friends/neighbors/colleagues. Cooked meals made a difference when I was too run down after chemo to cook.
      Best wishes

      1 comment
  • Tom Schink Profile

    My mom just got diagnosed with breast cancer (early Stage 2) and is extremely worried that she will lose her job. First, what's the likelihood of that and second, how can I try to calm this fear?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has...

      more

      Hi Tom, I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. There are laws to protect your Mom so she won't lose her job. Tell her to go to her human resources dept. at work and file FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) papers. Her Dr. will have to fill out his part of the paperwork. This will protect her when she has to take off work for treatment. She should also inquire about any disability benefits her employer might offer. Best wishes to you and your Mom

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably ...

      more

      I agree with Diana. It's definitely against the law to fire someone if she has cancer.

      Keep in mind, she might be scared in general and just not voicing it because it's really hard to. I worried a lot about missing work, when really, I was scared I was going to die. There are probably deeper fears under this one about work. Not that you need to pry them outta her, but remind her she needs to take care of herself, that you're there to listen, and that you'll take her to anyone else she wants to talk to, including a support group.
      Best wishes.

      Comment
  • Judy Carr Profile

    Diagnosed with breast cancer yesterday - how do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • lynda dew Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women...

      more

      That was the hardest thing about any of it. We sat our two children down. We named two of our friends who went through the same thing. We told them that I went to the doctor and we had some news. My daughter started to cry and sobbed "no, no". I held her and reminded her that those two women fought hard and they won the fight and I was going to do the same. My daughter said "you don't even look sick". I explained that that day was the sickest I was going to be. I told them that when I looked tired, lost my hair and looked really sick to say a prayer and thank God for chemo because the worse I looked, meant that it was working. Five months of chemo, lumpectomy, bi-later mastectomies and six weeks of radiation, I am in full remission and plan on being here for a long time. Tell your kids, comfort them, be strong and keep them involved. They won't be scared if you are honest (what they can handle at their age).. Good luck:). I'm praying for you.

      1 comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me...

      more

      Ah, Judy. I've been there, twice. You don't mention how old your kids are. The first time, mine were 7, 5, and 5 (twins). The second time they were 18, 16, and 16. The words I used were different each time, but the message was the same. I have great doctors, I trust them, and they tell me that they're going to give me the best treatment they can so I can get better. I never made any promises, but I gave them as much hope as I could. I'm on the other side of it all now, having finished chemo in March. I'm alive and well. No matter what age your kids are, they understand more than you think -- in their own way. They take their cues from you (and your partner, if you have one). Despite my own fear I tried my best to stay positive for them. They wanted frequent reassurance that everything was going to be ok. While I didn't quite go that far, I consistently told them that I was getting the best care I could so I could get well.
      It's very hard, I know. Best of luck and please send any other questions you might have.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is there a way to manage the shock I am having from the diagnosis of breast cancer a week ago?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • P C Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      Hello,

      I am newly diagnosed with DCIS. I fully understand how you feel right about now. I put this situation into God's hands. I educated myself about my diagnosis and I feel much better than I did at first. Just take it one day at a time. Find people you can confide in too. Stay active...

      more

      Hello,

      I am newly diagnosed with DCIS. I fully understand how you feel right about now. I put this situation into God's hands. I educated myself about my diagnosis and I feel much better than I did at first. Just take it one day at a time. Find people you can confide in too. Stay active and I know this part is hard, but stay busy. I have found when I stay busy I do not think about it as much. My MRI and surgery is next week (just days away) then radiation treatments. The hardest part thus far for me is the waiting. If that is where you are, just hang on. We are all in this journey together. God be with you, P Carter

      15 comments
    • Charlie Hansen Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I can only tell you what we've been able to do. We cried a lot than figured we have to do this so we have become educated as much as we can. Talk about it to those close to you. For us, our faith plays a major role also. God bless you.

      Comment

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