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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile

    How long is it until you start your radiation or chemo after you have surgery?

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_4 Patient
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Mary Anne,
      I started chemo 3 weeks after my surgery. The first day of my chemo I went in early morning had my port placed and then went immediately to have the first treatment. It was a long, hard, day. After that, the rest of the sessions seemed like a piece of cake! That was my experience...

      more

      Mary Anne,
      I started chemo 3 weeks after my surgery. The first day of my chemo I went in early morning had my port placed and then went immediately to have the first treatment. It was a long, hard, day. After that, the rest of the sessions seemed like a piece of cake! That was my experience which doesn't necessarily say you will do the same thing. I don't know if your doctor has told you about having a port. It makes the delivery of the chemo MUCH easier. Hang in there and take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Cheryl Wornham Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Mary Anne I dident have to have chemo but did have radiation it was 3 - 4 weeks after surgery

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What is triple neg invasive ductal breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Triple negative means it is not estrogen positive, progesterone positive or her 2 positive... It is not fed by any of these hormones. The good news it is very responsive to chemo. The bad news is there are no hormone blockers that help to prevent it from recurring. I was Dix triple negative on...

      more

      Triple negative means it is not estrogen positive, progesterone positive or her 2 positive... It is not fed by any of these hormones. The good news it is very responsive to chemo. The bad news is there are no hormone blockers that help to prevent it from recurring. I was Dix triple negative on 5/24. I have completed 6 rounds of TAC chemo and my tumor is gone. I still have to have minor surgery in the 17th and then radiation. Hope that helps!

      Comment
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It's exactly what I have it had . If you way h the little videos this ap has it helps to understand. I am 27 and had a double mastectomy on the 8/27 started chemo on 9/17 and am raising my 1 and 2 year old like any normal day . Ask for help and roll up your sleeves. The battle will make you a...

      more

      It's exactly what I have it had . If you way h the little videos this ap has it helps to understand. I am 27 and had a double mastectomy on the 8/27 started chemo on 9/17 and am raising my 1 and 2 year old like any normal day . Ask for help and roll up your sleeves. The battle will make you a super women . Please let me know if you need anything I have found a lot of research that has helped . Much love and laughter and don't be afraid tears are. Needed also .

      4 comments
  • gima green Profile

    Any bad experiences from taking tamoxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Lisa Doheny Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Yes hot flashes , bone pain which goes away after a while ,can not loose any weight, have no desire for any sexual relations. But we are here so I'm not complaining

      1 comment
    • gima green Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It seems like a cycle of pills from one to another

      Comment
  • Sam Perez Profile

    What are the effects of radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Your doctor and nurse would be the best people to speak with about side effects as side effects vary from person to person and depend on the radiation dose and what part(s) of the body are being treated. Sometimes, your overall health will affect how your body reacts to radiation treatment. ...

      more

      Your doctor and nurse would be the best people to speak with about side effects as side effects vary from person to person and depend on the radiation dose and what part(s) of the body are being treated. Sometimes, your overall health will affect how your body reacts to radiation treatment. Some of the most common side effects include, but may not be limited to: fatigue and weakness, reddening of the skin of the treated area, breast discomfort or pain, and swelling of the breast or arm on treated side.

      There are some ways to take special care of yourself during treatment that may reduce side effects:

      1. Get plenty of rest
      2. Eat a balanced, nutritious diet
      3. Take care of the skin in the treatment area
      4. Do not wear tight clothes over the treatment area
      5. Do not rub, scrub, or use adhesive tape on treated skin
      6. Do not put heat or cold (heating pad, heat lamp, ice pack) on the treatment area
      7. Protect the treated area from the sun
      8. Tell your doctor about ALL medicines you are taking (including vitamins, herbs, aspirin, etc.)

      Take care!

      1 comment
    • Eleanor Johnson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The only effect i received from radiation was just the darken of my skin. I did not experience the tiredness that most patients do.

      Comment

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