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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 5 - Breast Tissue Conservation Surgeries

If the cancer is detected early enough, there are options that will remove the cancer while preserving breast tissue. The common types are the lumpectomy (most often followed by breast radiation treatments) and the partial mastectomy.

Lumpectomy
A lumpectomy usually removes the least amount of breast tissue. The surgeon removes the cancer and a small portion of the surrounding tissue, but not the breast itself. Even though the lumpectomy is the least invasive breast cancer surgery, it can still be very effective, and further surgery may not be needed.

Partial Mastectomy
A partial mastectomy requires the surgeon to remove a larger portion of the breast than in the lumpectomy — perhaps a whole segment or quadrant of tissue — in order to eliminate the cancer. Occasionally, the surgeon will remove some of the lining over the chest muscles as well.

Related Questions

  • amy LAMM Profile

    What is the difference between a lumpectomy and excisional biopsy with clear margins?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Jennifer Jackson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am a RN with 35 years nursing experience, and I had an excisional biopsy myself last month. The terms mean pretty much the same thing. Technically, a lumpectomy is simply the removal of a lump. In an excisional biopsy, the lump is removed as well as a portion of healthy tissue surrounding...

      more

      I am a RN with 35 years nursing experience, and I had an excisional biopsy myself last month. The terms mean pretty much the same thing. Technically, a lumpectomy is simply the removal of a lump. In an excisional biopsy, the lump is removed as well as a portion of healthy tissue surrounding the lump. The terms clear, clean, or negative margins all mean that no suspicious cells were close to the edge of the excised tissue. In other words, they got it all. Close margins means suspicious or cancerous cells were close to the edge of the excised mass, and positive margins would mean that suspicious or cancerous cells were all the way to the edge of the excised tissue. In those incidences you would go back to surgery so they could take out a little more.

      Comment
    • amy LAMM Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      and also, has anyone ever heard of a phyllodies tumor? I guess there is a possibilty my tumor might just be that, but being it's so rare there are not many studies out there about it and each web site says something different, so I was hoping someone could shed some light my way?

      Comment
  • keri rutledge Profile

    Has anyone else experienced pain under their arm, down the side of their torso and rib area after lumpectomy and radiation. I am one year post-treatment and its gotten very uncomfortable.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2015
    over 1 year 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I had some pain under where my breast had been removed with a mastectomy about a year after treatment was complete. I asked my RT about it and he felt it was perhaps nerves firing up as one of mine had been severed. I thought it may be adhesions. He indicated ribs may weaken with rads. so just...

      more

      I had some pain under where my breast had been removed with a mastectomy about a year after treatment was complete. I asked my RT about it and he felt it was perhaps nerves firing up as one of mine had been severed. I thought it may be adhesions. He indicated ribs may weaken with rads. so just be careful. 3 weeks later I slipped getting out of the tub and that's the area I hit on the edge of the tub. I went to an urgent care clinic where X-rays were negative for any fractures. Fast forward a year later and I needed a chest X-ray for surgery. Something was seen in the left lung area (the side of my mastectomy) and my RT sent me for a CAT Scan rather than repeating the films. I had 5 healed rib fractures from the meeting with my tub, never had pain after my visit to the urgent care clinic so never went back and being a retired X-ray Tech. I know rib fractures don't always show up right away. You should talk with your doctor about it as perhaps some type of testing may be needed (and no I'm not a doctor).

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I didn't have that, you should mention it to your doctor.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My daughter has been told that, in addition to a lump in her breast, there is also a duct involved. What does this mean for her prognosis?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      If she was told that a duct was involved. Her doc. Was saying that her cancer had began in the milk ducts of the breast. It is the most common type of breast cancer accounting for 80%. Of all breast cancers. There are so many other things to ask for a prognosis , such as stage, receptor status,...

      more

      If she was told that a duct was involved. Her doc. Was saying that her cancer had began in the milk ducts of the breast. It is the most common type of breast cancer accounting for 80%. Of all breast cancers. There are so many other things to ask for a prognosis , such as stage, receptor status, erc. When they finish all the testing you'll have all
      The details you need about her particular type of cancer and how to beat it! I'll be thinking of her and keep the faith!

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I believe your attitude has everything to do with your prognosis

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just had a lumpectomy and sentinal node biopsy. Two weeks later I am having pain when I move my arm, especially over my head? Does this go away?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes it goes away eventually, take it easy though

      1 comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Took a long time for me too. And after 5 months, it's sometimes still tight and I need to stretch a lot, but the pain subsided eventually.

      Comment

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