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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 5 - Breast Tissue Conservation Surgeries

If the cancer is detected early enough, there are options that will remove the cancer while preserving breast tissue. The common types are the lumpectomy (most often followed by breast radiation treatments) and the partial mastectomy.

Lumpectomy
A lumpectomy usually removes the least amount of breast tissue. The surgeon removes the cancer and a small portion of the surrounding tissue, but not the breast itself. Even though the lumpectomy is the least invasive breast cancer surgery, it can still be very effective, and further surgery may not be needed.

Partial Mastectomy
A partial mastectomy requires the surgeon to remove a larger portion of the breast than in the lumpectomy — perhaps a whole segment or quadrant of tissue — in order to eliminate the cancer. Occasionally, the surgeon will remove some of the lining over the chest muscles as well.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Has anyone gone in for a lumpectomy and sentinel node biopsy and come out with a partial mastectomy axilllary lymph node dissection?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I don't think this is all that uncommon. I remember my mastectomy was late because the woman before me ended up with a mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Tests can only show so much and things can change once the surgeon starts the actual surgery. It is a shock to wake up and...

      more

      I don't think this is all that uncommon. I remember my mastectomy was late because the woman before me ended up with a mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Tests can only show so much and things can change once the surgeon starts the actual surgery. It is a shock to wake up and discover things didn't go as expected. My surgeon told me my 5 sentinal nodes were clear. After the actual complete pathology was done, one of the nodes had a small area of cancer and my diagnosis went from a 2A to a 2B.
      I was pretty upset. This probably happens a lot more than one would think.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yep. I was to have a lumpectomy at the bottom of the breast and up to the edge of the areola. I told him if he had to take the areola and nipple to take the whole thing He drew on me so I could see what he PLANNED to do based on the core biopsy and ultrasound and how he would arrange the the...

      more

      Yep. I was to have a lumpectomy at the bottom of the breast and up to the edge of the areola. I told him if he had to take the areola and nipple to take the whole thing He drew on me so I could see what he PLANNED to do based on the core biopsy and ultrasound and how he would arrange the the tissue. My 3 sentinel nodes were clean and he got good margins but I ended up with a partial mastectomy. The incision is well hidden in the crease beneath my breast but he had to cut to the base of the nipple and remove a tiny secftion of the areola. He did a great job piecing me back together. Until they get in there and the all the tests results are in, the final product can be an unknown to us until we wake up. Cancer has a nasty way of messing up the best plan our doctors try to accomplish for us. Good healing to you. Jo

      Comment
  • Jessica Fisher Profile

    I'm 29 recently diagnosed with IDC and the surgery option has been left up to me now and I'm struggling with the decision to have a lumpectomy or a preventative double mastectomy with full reconstruction. Suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    almost 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jessica, I'm sorry to hear about your DCIS diagnosis. I have stage 3 IDC and can relate to what you're feeling. Have you had the BRACA testing performed? It tests to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. That would definitely help with your decision. There are many things such as if any...

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      Hi Jessica, I'm sorry to hear about your DCIS diagnosis. I have stage 3 IDC and can relate to what you're feeling. Have you had the BRACA testing performed? It tests to see if you carry the breast cancer gene. That would definitely help with your decision. There are many things such as if any other members of your immediate family has had cancer, etc. I have a later stage of cancer so I have decided to have a double mastectomy. But it's such a personal decision to make. There is a wonderful site called breastcancer.org. You have to be very careful about doing research online. There is a lot of misinformation out there. This is a very good site for cancer info and includes a support board with other women that have DCIS. Dr Susan Love's breast book is also very informative. Best wishes to you whatever you decide,

      Diana

      6 comments
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I also had the option of choosing what treatment to do. It did not sit right with me because I am not a doctor. Educate yourself in all options. Try and think of all scenarios and how you might feel with each. I choose a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction. My surgery was just 2 weeks...

      more

      I also had the option of choosing what treatment to do. It did not sit right with me because I am not a doctor. Educate yourself in all options. Try and think of all scenarios and how you might feel with each. I choose a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction. My surgery was just 2 weeks ago.

      Good luck

      1 comment
  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Linda G Profile

    Do you have to wear a compression sleeve after a lumpectomy and sentinel node removal?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    about 5 years 10 answers
    • View all 10 answers
    • Becky Lynn Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I only had one sentinel node removed and I ended up with truncal lymph edema. I have a compression garment that works really well at decreasing the pain and swelling in my side.

      Comment
    • kim c Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I only had the sentinel node removed and nobody mentioned anything about a sleeve. I've had no problems, knock on wood.,,

      Comment

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