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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 5 - Breast Tissue Conservation Surgeries

If the cancer is detected early enough, there are options that will remove the cancer while preserving breast tissue. The common types are the lumpectomy (most often followed by breast radiation treatments) and the partial mastectomy.

Lumpectomy
A lumpectomy usually removes the least amount of breast tissue. The surgeon removes the cancer and a small portion of the surrounding tissue, but not the breast itself. Even though the lumpectomy is the least invasive breast cancer surgery, it can still be very effective, and further surgery may not be needed.

Partial Mastectomy
A partial mastectomy requires the surgeon to remove a larger portion of the breast than in the lumpectomy — perhaps a whole segment or quadrant of tissue — in order to eliminate the cancer. Occasionally, the surgeon will remove some of the lining over the chest muscles as well.

Related Questions

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    Just diagnoised with DCIS, stage 0, grade 1. Had a lumpectomy with clean margins. Not sure about radiation treatment. Do I need it?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Joanne Pawling Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was diagnosed dcis, stage 0, grade 2 and 3. Lumpectomy done and also had clear margins. My doctors have recommended radiation, and I began treatments last week. I also began taking Tamoxifen. I wish you well in your decision. my thought was fight it now, and hopefully I will never have to deal...

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      I was diagnosed dcis, stage 0, grade 2 and 3. Lumpectomy done and also had clear margins. My doctors have recommended radiation, and I began treatments last week. I also began taking Tamoxifen. I wish you well in your decision. my thought was fight it now, and hopefully I will never have to deal with this again.

      3 comments
    • Douglas Feil Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      That's a question for your doctor. You should get your doctor's opinion. My mom had the same thing, though, about 5 years ago. I think she opted out of radiation, but again, you have to get some second opinions. I think they (doctors) do radiation after a lumpectomy because they want to make...

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      That's a question for your doctor. You should get your doctor's opinion. My mom had the same thing, though, about 5 years ago. I think she opted out of radiation, but again, you have to get some second opinions. I think they (doctors) do radiation after a lumpectomy because they want to make sure they got all the abnormal cells, so nothing has a chance to spread later.

      Comment
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    Had lumpectomy and reexcision two weeks ago. Breast feels a little lumpy above the excision site. Is that normal? Also still having occasional twinges of pain.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 7 years 2 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes - very normal. Especially if you are in the approx 40% of women[like me] who ended up with a seroma i/under their lumpectomy surgical scar. A seroma is a fluid filled sac. It can become encapsulated ie., covered in very hard tissue which can be painful OR if can stay as it is OR as it can...

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      Yes - very normal. Especially if you are in the approx 40% of women[like me] who ended up with a seroma i/under their lumpectomy surgical scar. A seroma is a fluid filled sac. It can become encapsulated ie., covered in very hard tissue which can be painful OR if can stay as it is OR as it can slowly be reabsorbed by your body and disappear.

      You need to ensure the pain is not from a wound infection - is it hot, throbbing, oozing, raised body temperature or any other classic signs of infection?

      If not, high chance a seroma. Seromas normally diagnosed by ultrasound - as mine was after I continued to feel pain in/under lumpectomy scar without any sign of infection and had to ensure my breast did not jiggle as this sent shooting pains. Going over speed humps was the worst!

      If it is a seroma you also have a critical decision to make. Many resolve over time on their own or at least reduce to point where they are less painful. Others encapsulate or grow bigger.Some Drs will offer to aspirate your seroma ie., insert a needle into it and withdraw the liquid inside it, deflating it. There are negatives associated with this. Many time it is futile as it refills with liquid very quickly and the pressure and pain return. Inserting needles can introduce infection when there is none. Having more procedures on an already pummelled breast focussed on the same spot can be very upsetting as well as painful. On the positive, a percentage of seromas can be permanently deflated this way.

      The ultrasound will give you the exact dimensions if it is a seroma. That may assist you make up your mind about what to do. Mine was 4mm, it increased to 8mm and was becoming more of a daily problem, but reduced back to 4mm, which I can cope with. I notice if I am tired, run down or been doing things like lifting children or animals and they have pressed or come into contact with my affected breast, it gets more painful.

      There is the potential for the pain to be from other things eg., something left inside from the procedure, there may be stitches still inside, but that is more likely to be linked to infection. The thing about cancer spread is that is mostly painless in the earlier stages, but it has to be considered as well. The more accurate test for that is a dual breast coil MRI - MRI's are far more accurate than mammograms especially in denser breasts, unlike xrays or CT there is no large radiation dose and it is accurate down to very small cells. My imagist tells me MRI's detect cancer years years before other methods do. MRI's are noisy and you need a contrast dye for cancer cells detection.
      The problem is when your breast is still so tender from surgery and you are still in pain, the last thing you want is to have is them squished in a mammogram!
      Hope this gives you an oversight of main issues. Get it checked out!

      2 comments
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I am the same way. The onc said it was normal and may take a year to go away. I had a lot of shooting pains today and that is normal too...although it is not fun!

      Comment
  • Jk Joyce Profile

    Just wondering....I had a lumpectomy on my right breast and three weeks later to remove more tissue. Now my breast is about two sizes smaller than the other and my bra cups tend to wrinkle on that side. Is there special bras made for this.?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2012
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Kaye, You can be fitted for a bra that has pockets for pads but I found Water wear pads at Target, JC Penny, Dillards and Amazon.com that are really comfortable and can be slipped into a regular bra. They can fill Under the breast like mine or on the side. Many girls wear these for the push up...

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      Hi Kaye, You can be fitted for a bra that has pockets for pads but I found Water wear pads at Target, JC Penny, Dillards and Amazon.com that are really comfortable and can be slipped into a regular bra. They can fill Under the breast like mine or on the side. Many girls wear these for the push up look but they are great and inexpensive for our needs. You can also order the comfy cup that can be worn inside a regular bra. Just be comfortable. I have two sizes depending on the type of bra I'm wearing. I don't know what part of our great land you live in but department stores that have a nice ladies department usually carry these. Be sure to look at Amazon to get a good idea of what you're needs are.I shied away from the silicone and went for the soft cotton filled with water. It looked cooler. Let me know how you come out with your new shaplier self. :-D Jo

      Comment
    • Jk Joyce Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Thanks for the info. I will check these out. Jo, I live in Mount Airy, NC. Good ole Mayberry.

      Comment
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