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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I was told that calcium deposits were in the form of crescent moons. Also that when they begin to gather and combine together, they more inclined to be malignant. What have you found to be the case?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 1 answer
    • Christin Waleski-Kirby Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was told they can lead to cancer... Because it was a reason for my bilateral mastectomy

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hello all, thanks for all your wonderfully helpful responses to my RT question. I had my first RT treatment today. Went well but my skin is pink. Is that normal for the 1st treatment?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello Jayme,

      Your pinking sounds fast - all the women I know got it about a week into RT. There must be some who have ultra sensitive skin who experience it faster, however you need to listen to your body and action your concerns. You would not have posted this unless it raised issues for...

      more

      Hello Jayme,

      Your pinking sounds fast - all the women I know got it about a week into RT. There must be some who have ultra sensitive skin who experience it faster, however you need to listen to your body and action your concerns. You would not have posted this unless it raised issues for you.

      I would raise this immediately with the Radiation Oncologist in charge - ask to speak to them in person at the clinic + ask the RT operator how often their machines are recallibrated, when was the last date the machine being used on you was recallibrated and can they please double that check your dosimitry calculations are correct.

      I only raise the latter three issues as unfortunately there have been some terrible cases of poorly callibrated RT machines and/or incorrect dose calculations burning patients badly. Google New York Times and radiation for the series that revealed these problems. A signpost for these more serious problems was immediate pinking. Unfortunately some patients did not insist on getting immediate answers, and ended up with serious health consequences. I encourage you to raise your concerns now and not be a passive patient if you have something troubling you like this. RT is a serious, serious procedure and unfortunately the system for monitoring machines and errors is far from ideal - which means we need to be vigilant about protecting ourselves. Good luck and it would be great if you post what they tell you, how satisfied or not you are with their explanation and then how it all goes.

      Comment
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Yikes! Coco's suggestions sound valid. I also think being pink after one dose seems strange. I didn't really notice much change in my skin for weeks, maybe 4 or so. I had a burn under my armpit (had nodal involvement) but that didn't even begin to surface until the last week. I would also...

      more

      Yikes! Coco's suggestions sound valid. I also think being pink after one dose seems strange. I didn't really notice much change in my skin for weeks, maybe 4 or so. I had a burn under my armpit (had nodal involvement) but that didn't even begin to surface until the last week. I would also bring your concerns to your rad onc immediately. definitely refer to that research Coco mentioned. Even if all is fine in the end, you must advocate for yourself! And also keep moisturizing, immediately after treatment and before bed. Add a 3rd dose if you can get it in prior to 4 hours before treatment. Good luck!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is it usual to still have a low White Blood Cell count 4 1/2 weeks after last chemo ( 4th T/C) ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Doesn't your onc take blood before you infusian? Mine got low after #4 but never got to the point I couldn't have 5&6. I did TC.

      2 comments
    • Lisa G Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yes infact I couldn't get my 2nd surgery done because of it. It takes awhile for them come back up. Hang there

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Anyone have trouble with the skin on their feet after chemo? It's \ calloused and cracked. Winter feet only 10x worse! I've done a pedi and other things...just wondering if anyone had this issue and if it's chemo related. I finished in March.

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2011
    over 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3B Patient

      Yes! I have used everything and nothing works ;( my feet have never been so dry before. I finished my chemo may 8 .

      1 comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yup - and mine ate months later. Toenails awful still too. More often using foot files after shower or bath. I also use a moisturing foot butter stick made in Canada. You could go to the pharmacist and ask for a good diabetic foot cream (they usually contain urea to slough dead skin)

      Comment

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