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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 2 - Standard Treatment & Clinical Trials

Before selecting your treatment plan, you should first understand the difference between standard treatment and clinical trials.

Standard treatments are methods that experts agree are appropriate, accepted and widely used. These standard procedures have proven useful in fighting breast cancer in the past. A clinical trial, on the other hand, is an approved research study that some doctors believe has a strong potential to improve standard treatments. When clinical trials demonstrate better results than the standard, that new treatment becomes the standard. Remember, all our current standards were clinical trials at one time.

If a clinical trial is an option for you, your doctor will explain the possible trade-offs with the trial treatment versus standard treatment. Together with your medical team, you will need to decide what treatment method is the best for you and your health.

Let’s look more closely at the standard treatments your doctors may recommend.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    im 39 and was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer should i do chemo

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      There are so many answers to that question. It truly comes done to what your treatment teams recomends and your choices. I am ILC I chose to follow my treatment teams recomdations and through everything at the cancer. Others will tell you to go in the opposite direction. Cancer treatment is very...

      more

      There are so many answers to that question. It truly comes done to what your treatment teams recomends and your choices. I am ILC I chose to follow my treatment teams recomdations and through everything at the cancer. Others will tell you to go in the opposite direction. Cancer treatment is very indivdual. You didn't tell us the kind of cancer and if it was in your nodes. I am 2 1/2 years cancer free and went with a aggressive treatment. The decision was easy I wanted the cancer gone and to know I had a future.

      Comment
    • Penny Walton Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      My onc used some tools to show me the differences in my overall odds with and without chemo, a lot of data but it helped me to see what needed to be done. It's a tough choice, but you will find your individual path. God bless, Penny

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How many treatments of chemo will a woman with Stage 2 have to go through?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 8 answers
    • View all 8 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on what type of breast cancer, how aggressive, what grade, if there are any positive lymph nodes, etc. There are many things that factor into making a decision like this. This also may be done in conjunction with radiation therapy, and possibly hormone therapy too. There is no way...

      more

      It depends on what type of breast cancer, how aggressive, what grade, if there are any positive lymph nodes, etc. There are many things that factor into making a decision like this. This also may be done in conjunction with radiation therapy, and possibly hormone therapy too. There is no way to accurately guess this until a lot of cellular tests come back. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree with Sharon. I was stage 2, the order of my treatment was 4 A/C followed by 4 taxol treatments, then a lumpectomy, and 34 radiation treatments. Because I was hormone positive I am currently taking tamoxifen. It depends though, If you are her2 positive you would need herceptin for a...

      more

      I agree with Sharon. I was stage 2, the order of my treatment was 4 A/C followed by 4 taxol treatments, then a lumpectomy, and 34 radiation treatments. Because I was hormone positive I am currently taking tamoxifen. It depends though, If you are her2 positive you would need herceptin for a year, and your doc might recommend a mastectomy instead of a lumpectomy. There are many factors. Feel free to ask any other questions, I will gladly answer if I can!

      Comment
  • Jennifer Swallow Profile

    My doctor said that my mammogram and ultrasound show nothing, but the lumps are still there and sore. What should I do? I know an MRI would be good, but what if my doctor refuses to order one?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is your body.... the doctor can't refuse to order a test for you. I had a bit of an argument with my doctor about an MRI but he quickly relented and ordered it for me. An MRI will show what a mammogram and an ultrasound can't. In my case, it would have found my breast cancer much earlier....

      more

      This is your body.... the doctor can't refuse to order a test for you. I had a bit of an argument with my doctor about an MRI but he quickly relented and ordered it for me. An MRI will show what a mammogram and an ultrasound can't. In my case, it would have found my breast cancer much earlier. Be polite, be nice, but be persistant, and win this one as if your life depended on it. I hope Diana reads this as she will also support you in getting an MRI. You GO GIRL!

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jennifer. I totally agree with Sharon. You have lumps that a mammogram & ultrasound aren't picking up. Hopefully they are benign....but you don't know. It's crucial that you have an MRI preformed. I wished my doctors would have done one for me. Thus my cancer was found much too late. It is...

      more

      Hi Jennifer. I totally agree with Sharon. You have lumps that a mammogram & ultrasound aren't picking up. Hopefully they are benign....but you don't know. It's crucial that you have an MRI preformed. I wished my doctors would have done one for me. Thus my cancer was found much too late. It is your body and you need to demand more testing. If your doctor refuses then it might be time to find another doctor. Take care Jennifer & keep us posted

      Comment
  • Rita Siomos Profile

    What is the best thing to take for constipation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I used colace. Didn't always work, so my nurse told me to take a couple a day, rather than one. It helped. A really annoying side effect of the anti-nausea meds! But I guess better than nausea!?

      2 comments
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I had a real bad time with constipation. My Onc. Told me to take miralax. It's gentle & it works. You can get it by prescription or by it over the counter. I also took stool softeners with it as well. I had that side effect all throughout chemo and just had to stay one step ahead. Lol.

      3 comments

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