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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What is triple neg invasive ductal breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Triple negative means it is not estrogen positive, progesterone positive or her 2 positive... It is not fed by any of these hormones. The good news it is very responsive to chemo. The bad news is there are no hormone blockers that help to prevent it from recurring. I was Dix triple negative on...

      more

      Triple negative means it is not estrogen positive, progesterone positive or her 2 positive... It is not fed by any of these hormones. The good news it is very responsive to chemo. The bad news is there are no hormone blockers that help to prevent it from recurring. I was Dix triple negative on 5/24. I have completed 6 rounds of TAC chemo and my tumor is gone. I still have to have minor surgery in the 17th and then radiation. Hope that helps!

      Comment
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It's exactly what I have it had . If you way h the little videos this ap has it helps to understand. I am 27 and had a double mastectomy on the 8/27 started chemo on 9/17 and am raising my 1 and 2 year old like any normal day . Ask for help and roll up your sleeves. The battle will make you a...

      more

      It's exactly what I have it had . If you way h the little videos this ap has it helps to understand. I am 27 and had a double mastectomy on the 8/27 started chemo on 9/17 and am raising my 1 and 2 year old like any normal day . Ask for help and roll up your sleeves. The battle will make you a super women . Please let me know if you need anything I have found a lot of research that has helped . Much love and laughter and don't be afraid tears are. Needed also .

      4 comments
  • Sharon Danielson Profile

    Good News From Seminar In San Antonio For Triple Negative. Here is a link from Breastcancer.org. SABCS: A Recap of Triple-Negative Research http://community.breastcancer.org/blog/sabcs-a-recap-of-triple-negative-research/

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2007
    about 5 years 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Thanks Sharon. I read the article and it seems very optimistic. Just what tnbc's need. Hugs

      2 comments
    • Net M Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Good news, indeed! :)

      -net

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer in early stages and ended up removing her breasts except the nipples.. Now she has to do 4 sessions of Chemo as a preventative method Her 1st session is next week, is there anything i should do? Im really lost :(

    Asked by anonymous

    over 2 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I had the same type of treatment. I felt like I had the flu... with body aches, pains and feel weak. After about 4-5 days, I started feeling normal. Cook for her, whatever she could like to eat those few days after her treatment. Make sure she drinks plenty of fluids. Flavored water over...

      more

      I had the same type of treatment. I felt like I had the flu... with body aches, pains and feel weak. After about 4-5 days, I started feeling normal. Cook for her, whatever she could like to eat those few days after her treatment. Make sure she drinks plenty of fluids. Flavored water over ice is great. Her taste may change and have a metallic taste.... use plastic forks and spoons. The taste thing is odd because she will want some pretty weird things. I liked salads, "Hot Pockets" and fried egg sandwiches. Her hair will start dropping at some point, usually 2 weeks after her first treatment. She can either hang on to it as long as she can or she can shave her head, get a wig, or there are lots of scarves and hats available. I found wigs to be uncomfortable. Remind her, hair will grow back. Right now, the chemo is ridding her body of stray cancer cells that may be remaining. There a very good drugs for any nausea she might have. I never was nauseated at all. I celebrated each chemo date.... I was one more down and closer to being done. Everybody is different how they react to chemotherapy. I truly didn't find it to be that bad. She needs to listen to her body. The best advice I can give you is DO NOT BE AFRAID TO CALL HER ONCOLOGIST IF SOMETHING DOESN'T SEEM RIGHT. So many women will contact us instead of contacting the oncologist because"they don't want to bother", That is what they are there for..... bother them and get questions answered and concerns calmed. She will get through this especially because you love and care for your Mom. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Jean Williams Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      be a good daughter , Love Her and be there For Her

      Comment
  • Nadine Cancilliere Profile

    After my first chemo, I had the shot the next day was so nauseaus for almost a week. Passed out on Monday and broke my foot. I feel so useless and to top it off I'm moving next week. Second Chemo is tomorrow.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 3A Patient
    over 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      You poor thing. Does your onc know ? You shouldn't be so sick. If your meds weren't working, they need to be changed. Also, did you stay hydrated? It really makes a big difference. You can go in & have them hook you up with saline if needed. I hope this next one is better. Prayers to you.

      3 comments
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Oh my so sorry for you. Hope you heal well. Keep a bowl near you.

      1 comment

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