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Treatment

 
Treatment

Chapter: 6 - Treatment

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Treatment Introduction
In recent years, due to earlier detection and more effective treatments, many women diagnosed with breast cancer overcome the disease and go on to live healthy lives.

Treatment Options Recommended By Your Health Care Provider
It’s important to understand the different types of treatment options available to you, because you are an integral part of your decision-making team. Your medical team will advocate certain treatments, but they will also seek your input.

They will recommend a plan based on:
- Stage of cancer and whether or not it has spread
- Type of cancer, and status of the estrogen, progesterone, or HER2/neu receptors found in the cancer cells
- Your age, health, and menstrual/menopausal stage
- And whether or not this is your first cancer treatment

In general, there are five treatment options, and most treatment plans include a combination of the following:
1) Surgery
2) Radiation
3) Hormone Therapy
4) Chemotherapy
5) Targeted Therapies

Some are local, targeting just the area around the tumor with surgery or radiation. Others are systemic, targeting your whole body with cancer-fighting agents such as chemotherapy.

Most women receive a combination of treatments, but each case is unique, and your medical team will work to find the most effective treatment for you.

Getting A Second Opinion
Even so, you may find yourself second-guessing their recommendations or suggested treatment plan. If you’re hesitant for any reason, you should get the opinion of another doctor before beginning treatment. Your doctor will not mind if you want a second opinion; some insurance plans even require it.

Again, don’t hesitate to ask your medical team questions. When it comes to getting a second opinion, you are your own best advocate.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Hello! My mother was recently diagnosed with a "stage 0" DCIS. What are her treatment options? Has anyone out there been through this type of cancer? Please share. Scared Son!

    Asked by anonymous

    over 3 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Betti is so right, there are many factors to consider, and everyone's treatment plan is individual. Sometimes a patient may be given surgical options, based on her situation, of mastectomy or lumpectomy. Lumpectomy is usually followed by radiation. If the tumor is hormone positive,...

      more

      Betti is so right, there are many factors to consider, and everyone's treatment plan is individual. Sometimes a patient may be given surgical options, based on her situation, of mastectomy or lumpectomy. Lumpectomy is usually followed by radiation. If the tumor is hormone positive, anti-hormone therapy might be given. Besides the individual information about the cancer, age and general health are factors that are also considered. Because DCIS has not spread out of the breast, chemo would not be given, unless the diagnosis changes after the surgical pathology report.

      1 comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Everyone's case is different even with the same diagnosis as your mother. What has her doctor(s) told her? There are lots of factors that play into the treatment plan.

      2 comments
  • anonymous Profile

    Has anyone had interoperative radiation?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      From the little bit I have read about this procedure, it doesn't seem to be widely available. Like any treatment for breast cancer, it would probably depend on the type of breast cancer, the staging, lymph node involvement, and any number of findings in a pathology report. Breast cancer...

      more

      From the little bit I have read about this procedure, it doesn't seem to be widely available. Like any treatment for breast cancer, it would probably depend on the type of breast cancer, the staging, lymph node involvement, and any number of findings in a pathology report. Breast cancer treatment decisionsare being more and more often, tailored to the individual. There are a lot of factors that go into the decision as to what treatment will be the most effective for the individual patient.

      2 comments
    • nicole blagburn Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I am currently traveling to Zion Cancer Treatment Center of America and begged to have that procedure but my tumor was too big and I was too young to qualify. :(. You are lucky!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is chest tightness a side effect of Tomaxifen?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This is a question to ask your oncologist or his office. They can tell you if this is something to be concerned about and give you some peace of mind. We are taking some very powerful drugs which can have all sorts of side effects. Some of them we just have to live with and some need to be...

      more

      This is a question to ask your oncologist or his office. They can tell you if this is something to be concerned about and give you some peace of mind. We are taking some very powerful drugs which can have all sorts of side effects. Some of them we just have to live with and some need to be addressed. This is best done by chatting with your oncologist's office. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • janet levy Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since

      I agree with Sharon. I had some side effects with Arimidex and was just switched to Tamoxifen. Keep your oncologist apprised of any issues you have. Good luck and feel better.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Someone close to me had radiation treatment and something involving a needle needle. She is in her early forties. The lump on her chest has a scar about 12 cm long. What is the risk of her dying?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Not knowing anything about her or her cancer it is difficult to say. She may look as if she is dying because chemo can make you not feel very well. Losing your hair is NOT the look you want to have either! Turn your thinking around about her. Think of this as being a tough time for her while...

      more

      Not knowing anything about her or her cancer it is difficult to say. She may look as if she is dying because chemo can make you not feel very well. Losing your hair is NOT the look you want to have either! Turn your thinking around about her. Think of this as being a tough time for her while she is going through the treatment. This is helping her get rid of any cancer cells that might be lingering in her body. Don't think of her as if she if going to die, think of her as this is going to help her live a good long life. We are all doing that right here on this board. Be positive for her sake, she needs everyone's support right now. She WILL be ok. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Can clarify the situation ?

      Comment

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