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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

We will now cover the five stages of breast cancer and what to expect from each stage.

Cancer is assessed by stages ranging from 0-4; each stage represents a progression of the cancer. As the complexity of the cancer intensifies, so does the treatment required to fight it. Breast cancer is assigned to a stage based on where it began in the breast and how much of the breast and other parts of the body are affected by it.

Remember, the stage of cancer is separate from the tumor grade, which we discussed in Subchapter 3.2.

We will also review the types of cancer. First, covering the more common types of breast cancer, but also the unusual diagnoses like triple negative breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and cancer during pregnancy.

Your responsibility, as discussed in Chapter 4, is to develop a support team, of family or friends, that will comfort and encourage you in this time.

Related Questions

  • Nikol Vega Profile

    Should you tell your 10 year old daughter if you've been diagnosed with stage 0 (DCIS) breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Misty Wells Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes you should... my 10

      Comment
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes, let her be a part of your journey. It will build your relationship and she will grow up understanding why early detection is so important.

      Comment
  • meg wallace Profile

    What are the recurrence rates for stage 1 breast cancer (treatment with partial mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiation)?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Kaz Aki Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Everyone is different, everyone's cancer is different.

      Doctors tell me that my stage 1 high grade invasive ductal carcinoma with lumpectomy chemo radiation has an extremely high CURE rate, meaning I will die from some other issue when I am good and really really old, but not from this...

      more

      Everyone is different, everyone's cancer is different.

      Doctors tell me that my stage 1 high grade invasive ductal carcinoma with lumpectomy chemo radiation has an extremely high CURE rate, meaning I will die from some other issue when I am good and really really old, but not from this breast cancer. That does not mean, however, that I won't get a new and different cancer at some point in my life.

      Comment
  • Robert Hays Profile

    How does a man know if he has breast cancer, does he have lumps and tenderness

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Robert,

      My brother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. He was having some pain in his breast, felt the area and found a lump. He tried to look at it in the mirror, rubbed the lump and had some discharge from his nipple. He was being seen by his doctor for something else the...

      more

      Robert,

      My brother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. He was having some pain in his breast, felt the area and found a lump. He tried to look at it in the mirror, rubbed the lump and had some discharge from his nipple. He was being seen by his doctor for something else the next week and mentioned it to his doctor. Doctor referred him for a mammogram, which confirmed a couple of suspicious lumps. He had an ultrasound, a biopsy which diagnosed infiltrating ductal carcinoma.... (JUST like mine!!!) He had a mastectomy, and a oncoDX test was made of the tissue. An oncoDX test is a predictor is the cancer was the type that would likely reoccur, thus recommending treatment with chemotherapy. The scale is from 0 to 100. 0 = no reoccurrence 100= will reoccur. His score was -0- so he was done with his treatment!!! Anyway.... even though breast cancer is relatively rare in men, it can still happen. The symptoms are the same. If you have a lump in your breast..... man-up and have it checked!!! This site or breastcancer.org. will have symptoms of breast cancer. Early detection is the key to getting rid of this sneaky disease. Hang in there... Take care, Sharon

      3 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I would go to ur gp. Let them check it out. What I have learnt is that it's different for everyone.

      Comment
  • Sandra Allen Profile

    i am having a double mastectomy in jan do you have depression afterwards

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the...

      more

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the realization of the loss of a breast means different things to different women. It is difficult to predict how you will feel. My breasts are small and I didn't particularly have any attachment to them in regards to body image. I just wanted to get rid of the breast cancer and was very happy to get rid of the body part that contained it.
      I chose not to have reconstruction and have done well with a prosthesis. I was 59 when diagnosed and made this decision. It is different if women are diagnosed in their 20's, 30's, 40's etc. A large percentage of them have reconstruction which sounds like it is a long, procedure and not very comfortable. Anyway.... as for depression, if you tend to get depressed or feel down, it may be a problem but I can't say it is as a matter of fact. Hang in there darlin' you are getting rid of a lousy sneaky disease and that IS the most important thing. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and...

      more

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and you are right Sharon it is long and uncomfortable but I would do it all again. The part of the mastectomy that I found difficult was the recovery and not being to do the things I was used to doing like driving and showering on my own. Good luck to you Sandra, you will be fine and like Sharon said you are getting rid of an awful illness and it is the best way to do it. Let us know are you going as you progress. Cheers

      Comment

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