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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 8 - Breast Cancer During Pregnancy

Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy have tremendous additional strain due to concern for the safety of the unborn child. It is a traumatic and extremely difficult situation, but there is still hope because of the many treatment options available. If you are pregnant and have been diagnosed, be sure to communicate information about your pregnancy to your doctor. Your medical team will take extra care in designing the treatment plan that best controls the breast cancer while protecting your unborn child.

Your treatment plan will depend on the size of the tumor, its location, and the term of your pregnancy. As with women who are not pregnant, surgery is the first step for treating early-stage breast cancer. Surgery during pregnancy carries little risk to your unborn child, so your medical team will most likely proceed by removing the lump, and possibly some lymph nodes from under the arm, with a lumpectomy or mastectomy.

Chemotherapy may be a treatment option, depending on your cancer type and the stage of your pregnancy. The effects of hormone therapy on unborn children is not entirely understood; because of this, if hormone therapy is prescribed, it will most likely be used only after the baby is born.

Although the cancer cannot spread to and harm the unborn child, sometimes the best treatment plan for the mother may put the unborn child at risk. These decisions will require the expertise and consultation between your obstetrician, surgeon, medical oncologist, and radiation oncologist. You will also need the emotional support of family and friends and may benefit from the professional assistance of a skilled counselor or psychologist.

Related Questions

  • Lindsay McNally Profile

    I have stage 4 BC with bone mets. I'm 36 and recently had my ovaries removed. I'm now having breast pain and swelling and I'm wondering if it's another breast cancer. Anyone had a similiar experience?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Lindsay, if you haven't already called your doctor, you really need to, to get this checked out. Only he/she would be able to tell you if it is a recurrence. Hoping the best for you, and you treatment.

      1 comment
    • lisa Spencer Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Please go to your doctor, thinking if you x

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Why does my oncologist need me to have a CT scan of the stomach chest & pelvis? Tkx. Rox

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_2b Patient
    over 3 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I have a friend who had a CT of her chest, abdomen, and pelvis after completing her chemo. before her eye surgery. They were just checking and making sure cancer was no where else in her body. I'd be asking my Oncologist as to his/her reason(s) as that may not be why they are having you get one.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It could be just a baseline that can use to see changes in the future.

      Comment
  • ashley ritz Profile

    What does it mean when breast cancer is found in chest wall?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Ashley, I had cancer in my chest wall as well. It just means that the cancer has gone from the breast into the connecting wall of the chest. As Sharon said....make sure you get your Oncologist or surgeon to explain what all this entails. Hugs, Diana

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      My guess would be the breast cancer is in the breast tissue closest and connecting to the chest itself. I would contact your radiologist, surgeon, or oncologists to explain and show you in your mammogram or other diagnostic imaging where this tumor is located.
      They can then answer any...

      more

      My guess would be the breast cancer is in the breast tissue closest and connecting to the chest itself. I would contact your radiologist, surgeon, or oncologists to explain and show you in your mammogram or other diagnostic imaging where this tumor is located.
      They can then answer any questions you would have about treatment. It is a great idea to bring in a relative, or good friend to take notes so you can concentrate on getting answers to your questions. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    my breast has hardened two week after biopsy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    about 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My theory would be it's a hematoma or a collection of blood in the biopsy area that hardened. I had one after my stereotactic biopsy that got really hard for several weeks and I think it was still somewhat there when I had my mastectomy about 3 1/2 weeks later. Concerns should be brought to...

      more

      My theory would be it's a hematoma or a collection of blood in the biopsy area that hardened. I had one after my stereotactic biopsy that got really hard for several weeks and I think it was still somewhat there when I had my mastectomy about 3 1/2 weeks later. Concerns should be brought to your doctor's attention but if it is a hematoma that has hardened there really isn't anything they can do about it. I was told to ice mine afterwards and still ended up with one.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I would vote for a doctor contact too. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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