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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 7 - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory Breast Cancer is another uncommon but aggressive form of cancer, in which abnormal cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. This type of cancer usually does not produce a distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast. Symptoms begin to appear when the lymph vessels become blocked by the cancer cells; the breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm. The breast skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and the nipple’s shape may change, causing it to appear dimpled or inverted.

Typically, Inflammatory Breast Cancer grows rapidly and requires aggressive treatment. It may be classified as Stage 3B, 3C, or even Stage 4, depending on your physician’s diagnosis and the results of your biopsy. The treatment most oncologists recommend includes initial chemotherapy followed by a mastectomy and chest wall radiation therapy. The doctor may recommend additional chemotherapy and hormone treatments following radiation.

Related Questions

  • Shelia Combs Profile

    I was started on Xeloda oral chemo today. Has anyone else ever taken this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Comment
    • Katrina Carrera Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      No, my chemo is being administered intravenously. I'm on Taxol

      Comment
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  • tes tes Profile

    Just had 1st chemo 2days ago. Been in bed ever since. Fatigue too much to bear. Water makes me more nauseous in spite of anti nausea drugs. How long will this fatigue last? Any tips?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      When I was going thru chemo I couldn't stand the taste of water, so I drank Simply Lemonade. Hope you feel better soon. Always call your doctor to ask any questions. They should be there for you.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It varies with each person. I was quite exhausted for the first 4 to 5 days, then gradually OK. During the 2nd week, I was out taking care of my 7 horses and ponies.

      You need to find something to keep you hydrated. Maybe try some of the old fashion remedy, 7 Up and soda crackers. Gatoraid,...

      more

      It varies with each person. I was quite exhausted for the first 4 to 5 days, then gradually OK. During the 2nd week, I was out taking care of my 7 horses and ponies.

      You need to find something to keep you hydrated. Maybe try some of the old fashion remedy, 7 Up and soda crackers. Gatoraid, or Ginger Ale may also work. If these seem a bit over-powering, you can always water them down with tap water. Put a few ice cubes in too. Anything liquid you can get down is truly ok unless it is a 5th of Vodka!!!

      You really need to get the nausea under control so be sure and don't be shy about bugging your oncologists office. If you become constipated.... which is very common, I was told to take Miralax. If relieved my problem without giving me any cramping. Take care, I hope you find a way quickly to get through the side effects. Sharon

      Comment
  • Jan  Hasak Profile

    Does exercise help when you are undergoing chemotherapy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 2003
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Exercising while undergoing chemotherapy can be beneficial both psychologically and physically. Light and stimulating exercise can help to reduce fatigue and the risk of thrombosis (blood clotting in the veins). It can also keep the bones strong and healthy and reduce the risk of weight gain...

      more

      Exercising while undergoing chemotherapy can be beneficial both psychologically and physically. Light and stimulating exercise can help to reduce fatigue and the risk of thrombosis (blood clotting in the veins). It can also keep the bones strong and healthy and reduce the risk of weight gain related to chemotherapy. A walk or gentle run has also been known to help with mild nausea. Additionally, exercise can increase your sense of self-empowerment and improve social integration.

      You need to remember that your ability to perform strenuous exercise may be impaired, so you need to develop a light exercise routine and find a balance that is most beneficial to you.

      Hope this helps!

      Comment
    • Ali S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It helped me!

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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