loading... close

Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 6 - Triple Negative Breast Cancer

In Subchapter 3.1, “Growth of Cancer”, we discussed the role of receptors in cancer cells. Doctors seek to determine what causes certain types of cancer to progress by identifying its “receptors”. These receptors function like mouths: when open, the cancer cells feed and rapidly grow.

Triple Negative Breast Cancer tumors lack receptors for any of three bodily chemicals: estrogen, progesterone, and the HER2/neu gene. There are still effective treatments for it, such as chemotherapy, but doctors are not sure what stimulates this type of tumor to grow.

Women with a family history of breast cancer, specifically with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 breast gene mutation, are more at risk for developing Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

Related Questions

  • sandra hayley Profile

    Brca2 gene..anyone with this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • sandra hayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Melissa, I had a mastectomy in 2006, and will have a mastectomy on the left side as a preventative, so that I won't get cancer again! You have a great positive attitude! Good luck in future..

      Comment
    • sandra hayley Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Did you go through radiation and chemo? Last year I went through radiation..:( tiring isn't it.

      Comment
  • Renee Boone Profile

    I am on my second round of chemo and herceptin drug for stage 1 breast cancer and stage 2 lymph node positive her 2. Now I am having pain in stomach and ribcage, want ot know if that's normal. No other pain anywhere else.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Karrie Cameron Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Flu-like symptoms may occur after treatment. This includes fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint aches, cough, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose. Diarrhea may occur. You are at a greater risk of having infections due to low whit blood cell count. You may feel some general pain, trouble...

      more

      Flu-like symptoms may occur after treatment. This includes fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint aches, cough, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose. Diarrhea may occur. You are at a greater risk of having infections due to low whit blood cell count. You may feel some general pain, trouble sleeping. Hope this helps. I start my herceptin on jan 30th.

      Comment
    • Kelly Leigh Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would recommend navigatecancerfoundation.org for excellent answers to questions like this. The nurse I speak with has been an oncology nurse for 29 years and answers are usually back within a day. It is sponsored by LIVESTRONG, no charge to cancer patient. Let us know!

      Comment
  • Ashley Reynolds Profile

    Anyone here have the BRCA2 gene?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993 and it was DCIS on the left. I had a lumpectomy and radiation. Last February 2011 they found something on my mammo so I had a biopsy done which turned out to be a new cancer on the left side of DCIS again. They tested me and I am positive for...

      more

      I was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993 and it was DCIS on the left. I had a lumpectomy and radiation. Last February 2011 they found something on my mammo so I had a biopsy done which turned out to be a new cancer on the left side of DCIS again. They tested me and I am positive for BRCA2. My sister died from breast cancer and her granddaughter (age 27) was diagnosed with stage 2 cancer and she had BRCA2 as well. After having a bilateral mastectomy this time around, they also discovered I had breast cancer in the right breast which was ICLS. They are encouraging me to have my ovaries removed soon as the gene increases my chances for getting ovarian cancer. Rely on your doctors and other experts as your emotions can get out of control when you start listening to a lot of other people.

      4 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Yes, I have the BRCA2 gene mutation. I first had breast cancer in 2000, at age 44. It was Stage 1B, no node involvement, DCIS with slight ductal invasion. I had a mastectomy and radiation. I was diagnosed in October 2011 with cancer in my remaining breast. It's not a recurrence but a new...

      more

      Yes, I have the BRCA2 gene mutation. I first had breast cancer in 2000, at age 44. It was Stage 1B, no node involvement, DCIS with slight ductal invasion. I had a mastectomy and radiation. I was diagnosed in October 2011 with cancer in my remaining breast. It's not a recurrence but a new cancer. Stage 2A, invasive ductal, with no node involvement but more aggressive and a larger tumor this time around. Given these facts, I was tested shortly after my second diagnosis in October 2011.

      Do you have more specific questions? I can tell you that your siblings and children, male and female, have a 50:50 chance of having the mutation. My one sibling, a sister in her early 50's, has tested positive. If inherited, there are increased risks for breast and other forms of cancer in both males and females, more so for females. First piece of advice: do not go on the internet and start searching. Rely on your doctors, geneticists, and other experts in the field. I'll be happy to answer any other questions or concerns you may have.

      Comment
  • Randall  Phipps  Profile

    Is breast cancer hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      It can be Randall, but in over 75% of women diagnosed with breast cancer...there is no family history at all. I wasn't aware of this until I was diagnosed last year. I had no family history of breast cancer. I do think it's a good idea to have the genetic BRACA testing performed. If a woman...

      more

      It can be Randall, but in over 75% of women diagnosed with breast cancer...there is no family history at all. I wasn't aware of this until I was diagnosed last year. I had no family history of breast cancer. I do think it's a good idea to have the genetic BRACA testing performed. If a woman tests positive for the gene, she will need to look at more options in her treatment, and there are several more things to be considered as well in a positive result.

      1 comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It can be. See if you can get the brace test to see if you or she is positive.

      3 comments

Educational Video

Personal Story

  • No related Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 3

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

spread the word