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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 6 - Triple Negative Breast Cancer

In Subchapter 3.1, “Growth of Cancer”, we discussed the role of receptors in cancer cells. Doctors seek to determine what causes certain types of cancer to progress by identifying its “receptors”. These receptors function like mouths: when open, the cancer cells feed and rapidly grow.

Triple Negative Breast Cancer tumors lack receptors for any of three bodily chemicals: estrogen, progesterone, and the HER2/neu gene. There are still effective treatments for it, such as chemotherapy, but doctors are not sure what stimulates this type of tumor to grow.

Women with a family history of breast cancer, specifically with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 breast gene mutation, are more at risk for developing Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

Related Questions

  • John Johnston Profile
  • Rebekah Imig Profile

    I recently found out that i have the BRCA1 mutated gene and am meeting with a genetic counselor next week. What do I have to look forward to?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Jody Feil Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom found out she has this as well. I think for her, it just means getting checked more often and being as proactive as you can. You can't change your genetic makeup (at least not that I'm aware of), so it's best to just come up with a plan with your doctor. I would recommend talking to a...

      more

      My mom found out she has this as well. I think for her, it just means getting checked more often and being as proactive as you can. You can't change your genetic makeup (at least not that I'm aware of), so it's best to just come up with a plan with your doctor. I would recommend talking to a doctor that has experience with patients that have this marker as well. They will know more about what to look for. Whatever you do, try not to stress or worry. From what everyone says, worry and stress never help. So try not to worry. I think a plan of action with your doctor is best.

      Comment
    • Ana Naluh Andrade Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You have to know if there's any other step you can do to prevent other cancer - in my case we removed my ovaries. Also, know with details about your risks, what you have to avoid in your life, what you can do to be proactive!

      Comment
  • Allison Mosely Profile

    I've had a bilat mastectomy, scheduled for my ovaries and tubes removed. How much will I benifit from Chemo? I'm BRCA1+, IDC, stage 2b, 2/4 nodes. I know it diminishes my chances for recurrence, but how much?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Allison, I agree with Donna. Especially since you had 2/4 positive nodes and are BRAC as well. You certainly don't want to look back and wonder why you didn't do the chemo. I completed 8 dose dense treatments in Sept. then had my bilateral mastectomy. My path results showed I had 13/15...

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      Hi Allison, I agree with Donna. Especially since you had 2/4 positive nodes and are BRAC as well. You certainly don't want to look back and wonder why you didn't do the chemo. I completed 8 dose dense treatments in Sept. then had my bilateral mastectomy. My path results showed I had 13/15 positive nodes with 2 breaking outside the node. So...my Onc. Recommended 8 more rounds of chemo with two different drugs. I was upset and felt like I was back at square one. But I just think of it as something I must do in order to survive. You are on the right path. God bless you on your road to recovery! Hugs, Diana

      Comment
    • Donna Ginnings Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2001

      Get the chemo, then you will never regret that you didn't take it. I only had 1 node and my cancer returned after 3 years even with chemo, but I didn't have ovaries removed and should have. May God bless and heal you. You are on the right track. Get the chemo and don't look back.

      Comment
  • Megan Smith Profile

    My mother is having a double mastectomy. Post surgery, what are the advantages of her doing genetic testing? Thanks!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Hi Megan genetic testing for the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are used post surgery as a further test to determine the treatment course. A positive result tells you that you carry the breast cancer gene the doctor might want to be more aggressive with her treatment and maybe suggesting removal of her...

      more

      Hi Megan genetic testing for the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 are used post surgery as a further test to determine the treatment course. A positive result tells you that you carry the breast cancer gene the doctor might want to be more aggressive with her treatment and maybe suggesting removal of her ovaries. A positive results will also help the family members male and female siblings and children get better monitoring and screening like earlier mammograms then age 50 or blood test and ultra sounds to screen for ovarian, prostrate and testicular cancers A negative results says that one doesn't carry the breast cancer gene but they are only testing two genes there maybe more that they are unable to test at this time. A positive or negative result does not mean you will or will not get cancer. It is just saying the gene is or is not present.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      There are laws out there to protect you after positive gene testing. If you are having problems contact civil right lawyers in your state. You can google there. Site and in Hawaii there is a link for free help

      Comment

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