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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 5 - Stage 4

Stage 4 is the most advanced stage of breast cancer, because it has spread to other organs of the body; most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain. This is known as “metastatic cancer”.

If you have been diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer, the strenuous cycles of treatment can be exhausting. You will need to make careful decisions and plans regarding your condition, but there is no reason to give up on life and relationships. Many women with Stage 4 cancer discover strength of character and qualities of resilience they never knew they had before.

Remember to rely on your supportive group of family and friends. With their care and support, as well as your personal motivation, you will be able invest wholeheartedly in the options at hand, making the most of life for you and your loved ones.

Related Questions

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  • carol hobday Profile

    My 33 year old daughter was just diagnosed with breast cancer. She was told it was LEVEL 3. When she met with the surgeon today, she was told that the level has to do with how fast the tumor is growing. Is Level 3 the same as Stage 3?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It sounds as if the level 3 and grade 3 are the same. It is correct in that it indicates how fast or how aggressive the cells are.

      Stage is different and it is an indication of how far along the disease has progressed. Within the stage there are levels A, B, and sometimes C. I was a Stage...

      more

      It sounds as if the level 3 and grade 3 are the same. It is correct in that it indicates how fast or how aggressive the cells are.

      Stage is different and it is an indication of how far along the disease has progressed. Within the stage there are levels A, B, and sometimes C. I was a Stage 2-A, and it went to 2B after my surgery. My grade was 2/3 which meant it was on the aggressive side of cell types. There are also different types of breast cancer, the most common is IDC.
      Please read the information this site has to offer. You can always ask us, we are not doctor's but we can share our personal experience with you or with your daughter. .

      Everybody's treatment protocols are different. It is no longer "one size fits all". Treatments are tailored for what type of cancer cells are found. Usually, it will be 2 to 3 different treatments and or a combo of all. Surgery, Chemotherapy, and radiation. Sadly, breast cancer is so common but the treatments have come a long way. Survival rates have gone up too, thankfully. It's not easy but it is done all the time. Please go with your daughter to her consultation appointment... might not be bad to take a 3rd person along too. So much information is given and your daughter will probably be in shock just from hearing she has breast cancer. Hang in there, your daughter is lucky to have you standing by her side. Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      There is also grades could be grade 3? Did she have a biopsy ? And information should on path report ask dr for copy and to explain.

      Comment
  • Diane Sakowski Profile

    5.6 cm. stage? Surgery in days. Scared

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women...

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      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women having surgery, going through their treatments and coming out as a victorious survivor! You WILL make it through this journey and be a survivor just like we are. I can assure you, there are good endings to breast cancer. I am a 5 year survivor and just had another GOOD check-up this past Wednesday. I wish we could all get together and give you a little sack of our collective courage. For me, just as Rita said, the surgery.... in my case a mastectomy.... was NOT that bad! The chemo. again, was not that bad. As my oncologist told me...."This is NOT your mother or grandmother's chemotherapy." You stop people from telling you negative stories.... don't listen to them.
      Please remember, we are all here to help support everyone going through this journey. Positive thoughts only.... put on your pink warrior outfit.... and march with determination. Do not be afraid to ask questions of your team, they are there to help you. You WILL triumph as so many women have before you. God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My tumor was 7.3 cm I am stage 3. Last year I had surgery, chemo, and radiation. Today the cancer is gone. I jave to be villigent about my check up but today No ca

      Comment
  • Unknown Unknown Profile

    My mom is having a double mastectomy with reconstructive surgery on Tuesday. Any recommendations on what to pack and how I can support her the best way possible?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Kathy M Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Pack loose button up or zip up shirts. Bring a pillow for the drive home that can get bumpy and uncomfortable. Check to see if she will be given a surgical bra that will hold the drains. It makes things a lot easier. Most of all your love and support. Your mom is in my thoughts and prayers.

      Comment
    • Natasha Nunnally Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Pack your patience and understanding. I had a bilateral mastectomy about 30 days ago, and my Aunt has been so wonderful and supportive just being here by my side and helping me through all the difficult time. Try not to leave your mom's side. Make sure someone is there at the hospital with her...

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      Pack your patience and understanding. I had a bilateral mastectomy about 30 days ago, and my Aunt has been so wonderful and supportive just being here by my side and helping me through all the difficult time. Try not to leave your mom's side. Make sure someone is there at the hospital with her especially at night cause that's when real emotion start to set in. I will keep your family in my prayers.

      Comment

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