loading... close

Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 5 - Stage 4

Stage 4 is the most advanced stage of breast cancer, because it has spread to other organs of the body; most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain. This is known as “metastatic cancer”.

If you have been diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer, the strenuous cycles of treatment can be exhausting. You will need to make careful decisions and plans regarding your condition, but there is no reason to give up on life and relationships. Many women with Stage 4 cancer discover strength of character and qualities of resilience they never knew they had before.

Remember to rely on your supportive group of family and friends. With their care and support, as well as your personal motivation, you will be able invest wholeheartedly in the options at hand, making the most of life for you and your loved ones.

Related Questions

  • Nancy Wing Profile

    I was diagnosed with stage 0 DCIS. I had a single left mastectomy on 11/8/11. I am so scared it is going to happen on the other side. I started on tomaxifin to help reduce my risk. Does anyone know what the chances are it can happen on the other side?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 0 Patient
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Donna Gray Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision....

      more

      I had stage 0 DCIS. I opted for a double mastectomy. I am 47 and did not want to spend the rest of my life worrying about getting it in my other breast. When the final pathology report came back after my mastectomy they found abnormal cells in the other breast. So for me I made the best decision. Best of luck to you.

      Comment
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is...

      more

      I am like Donna had ductal carcinoma in situ 2003 had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies they did find abnormal cells in other breast. 2008 had a reoccurrence on incisional line on affected breast. Again caught early had further bilateral simple mastectomies with negative lymph nodes. There is no perfect treatment or "cure" for breast cancer even with mastectomies it us impossible to get all the breast tissue out unless they go back to the radical mastectomies of the old days. Main thing is to be your own advocate make sure you continue to have mammograms or breast ultrasounds. Early detection saves lifes. We all have in the back of our minds the "what if it comes back" thought. Even those that are 20 and 30 year survivors. Remember you are a survivor, and always try to stay positive. Don't let the negative thoughts interfere in a productive happy life. I always say no matter what there is something to be thankful for every day take care

      Comment
  • Rafi Togoo Profile

    My mother (65 years old) has stage 4 breast cancer with bone metastasis. She is advised herceptin and chemotherapy every three weeks. Chemotherapy is for 6 cycles. How long do we have to continue with herceptin?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Catherine Nodurft Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Sometimes doctors prescribe Herceptin for 1+ years, but it depends. Ask her oncologist what they recommend for your mother's case.

      Comment
    • Isabel Souchet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I had chemotherapy with herceptin for 5 treatments n then another 9 months, every three weeks, of herceptin.

      Comment
  • Kristine Fonseca Profile

    What is the survival rate of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Stage 2, Triple Negative and what are the side effects of TAC Chemo treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by...

      more

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by knowing that I celebrated my 5th year of being cancer free on 8/23/11. I was diagnosed with Triple Negative, Invasive and Stage 2A. I was 52 Yrs old when diagnosed and I am now 58.
      I know that God is in control of all our lives therefore I live my life a day at a time staying focused on what is most important to me and what makes me happy no matter what and that is my family and God. Follow your Dr's Advice:) always have hope, faith and love.
      Stay encouraged and enjoy each and everyday!
      Your Sister of Hope!!

      5 comments
    • Cindy Rathbun Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same...

      more

      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same breast...diagnosed DCIS, again TNBC. I elected to have bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Post op pathology showed 2 additional types of micro malignant cells waiting to happen. I feel totally at peace with my decision. Life is good. I am back to playing golf and exercising. Yoga and meditation are high priority for staying focused and strong. The path to wellness starts in our own minds...know it, believe it, and you will be better than ever!

      3 comments
  • Ally Chapis  Profile

    How do I try to cheer my mom up during treatment? What can I do to make her feel better?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the...

      more

      I agree with the above...just being there is most important. I have been with both a parent & a sibling during a treatment & right now I am helping my best friend through it. When I am with her (usually the week following treatment, when things are at their worst), I clean the litter box, do the dishes, keep her paperwork organized, keep myself educated on her medications so I know what to expect, keep a log of when she has taken medication and when she has eaten (this helps to know when she can take another dose & whatnot), I act as sort of an eager slave to get her water or food or whatever she might want, & I try to make her laugh. I also let her cry & complain without always trying to cheer her up. She needs to get that sadness/pain/frustration out & I don't want her to feel she can't. I validate her feelings & then offer whatever love & support I can. All of this is also a huge help to her fiancé (if your father is also in the house). When he comes home from work, I encourage him to take some time to himself before taking over caring for my friend. And I know helping out around the house really helps relieve stress for him. He also reads to her every night. Which is something anyone can do.

      All of the answers given cover it...just being there makes a huge difference. But I thought I'd offer some ideas of what I've done. :-) My best to you & your family.

      Comment
    • Lori A Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom is still going through her treatments and I did her wash, made food and she stayed with me after her surgery.

      Comment

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word