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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • Shelley Zipp Profile

    I just found out I have triple negative breast cancer, a form of invasive ductal carcinoma - stage 1 1.3cmm tumor, very small, but still requires llumpectomy, chemo, then radiation. What's the recovery time after a lumpectomy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Sarah Adams Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2010

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no...

      more

      Has your doctor tested you for the BRCA gene mutation? If not, I would suggest doing that before moving forward with him/her. Triple negative breast cancer is most often associated with the BRCA gene mutation & if you happen to have it, you may be advised to do more than a lumpectomy. I'm no doctor...it's just a suggestion. I'd get a second opinion, anyway. :) Wishing you the best!

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around...

      more

      Hello - you know lumpectomies can vary enomormusly in size and location, as can the number and type of stitches required. All that as well as your general health and other complications such as infection means the recovery rate can vary significantly from person to person. I was discharged around 16 hours after the operation. I had to stay overnight because of bad reaction to general anesthetic + I was a late in the day operation. I had about 57grams removed from my right inner upper quadrant and I had double stitching [underneath as well as on top]. It took about a week for the special bandages to fall off naturally. I was back doing 90 minute yoga class within a few days of the lumpectomy, so on one level it was a fast recovery BUT I needed some physiotherapy to restore my right arm mobility to about 95% of what it was - that was caused by the sentinel node biopsy though, not the lumpectomy. Many women I have spoken to say they experience more problems from the sentinel node biopsy rather than the lumpectomy. The lumpectomy is a fat removal essentially whereas the sentinel node biopsy is close to a lot of nerves and pathways and muscles so this is not unexpected.

      Comment
  • Lisa Majka  Profile

    How many types of Breast Cancers are there? I'm also wondering if Inflammatory Breast Cancer is the worst one you can get?

    Asked by anonymous

    Patient
    about 7 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Any type of breast cancer has the chances of containing aggressive cells. When diagnosed with breast cancer, there is the ability to look at individual cells and grade them for their aggressiveness. So many factors go into staging and grading breast cancer and then the treatment is...

      more

      Any type of breast cancer has the chances of containing aggressive cells. When diagnosed with breast cancer, there is the ability to look at individual cells and grade them for their aggressiveness. So many factors go into staging and grading breast cancer and then the treatment is individualized for the patient. Inflammatory breast cancer has the chances of being one of the more aggressive types but it is also one of the more rare diagnosed.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I just looked this up on several sites... around a 1-5% of breast cancers can be inflammatory or IBC.

      Comment
  • Paula Tay Profile

    I have stage 1 BC... Had a lumpectomy November 25th. Last weekend I had severe hives and my breast is redish.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes, I agree with Lysa. Contact your dr ASAP.

      Comment
    • Lysa Allison Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a lumpectomy and did not experience hives or redness. I would contact my doctor. It's better to safe than sorry.

      Comment
  • Robin Bailey Profile

    Should you tell people when you have stage 0?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I say YES, because you are a great example of why early detection is so important! :)

      2 comments
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree you should tell, I did. I am also stage 0

      1 comment

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