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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • Robin Bailey Profile

    Should you tell people when you have stage 0?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 8 years 3 answers
    • Gail Horton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I say YES, because you are a great example of why early detection is so important! :)

      2 comments
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I agree you should tell, I did. I am also stage 0

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    What does it mean when it says 98% live a year with stage 2... when the charts say its a 98% expectancy for 8 years what does that actually mean???

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I agree with Sharon. When I was newly diagnosed I looked at the stats online. For one thing, they're very outdated. And for another, every woman is different. I stopped looking at stats and when I did choose to go online, I looked up survivor stories instead. :)

      2 comments
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      I don't think the statistics are worth the paper they're written on, and I've never paid a lot of attention to them. (I've had breast cancer twice -- first time Stage 1B, this time Stage 2A). Generally, the survival stats go down the more advanced and aggressive the cancer is. In reality,...

      more

      I don't think the statistics are worth the paper they're written on, and I've never paid a lot of attention to them. (I've had breast cancer twice -- first time Stage 1B, this time Stage 2A). Generally, the survival stats go down the more advanced and aggressive the cancer is. In reality, treatments have become so advanced between my 1st bout in 2000 and my second in 2011 that I meet people in the chemo room who have had advanced cancer for several years or more. They come in for regular "boosts" of chemo and go on and live their lives.

      So don't jump to any conclusions based on statistics. Rely on your doctor and ask him any questions you may have.

      Comment
  • Diane Sakowski Profile

    5.6 cm. stage? Surgery in days. Scared

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women...

      more

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women having surgery, going through their treatments and coming out as a victorious survivor! You WILL make it through this journey and be a survivor just like we are. I can assure you, there are good endings to breast cancer. I am a 5 year survivor and just had another GOOD check-up this past Wednesday. I wish we could all get together and give you a little sack of our collective courage. For me, just as Rita said, the surgery.... in my case a mastectomy.... was NOT that bad! The chemo. again, was not that bad. As my oncologist told me...."This is NOT your mother or grandmother's chemotherapy." You stop people from telling you negative stories.... don't listen to them.
      Please remember, we are all here to help support everyone going through this journey. Positive thoughts only.... put on your pink warrior outfit.... and march with determination. Do not be afraid to ask questions of your team, they are there to help you. You WILL triumph as so many women have before you. God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My tumor was 7.3 cm I am stage 3. Last year I had surgery, chemo, and radiation. Today the cancer is gone. I jave to be villigent about my check up but today No ca

      Comment
  • Becky N Profile

    When does swelling in axillary area go down after lumpectomy. It feels like a fat lip! Lumpectomy was 8 days ago. Arm is fine, incision looks great! Thanks gals xoxo

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    about 6 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 3C Patient

      It could be a bit of fluid build up that the surgeon needs to drain. I'd call the surgeons nurse Monday morning and ask if its still really puffy. You should have a follow up appointment soon too.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      For me it took about 2 months for my swelling to subside. My dr stuck a needle in the area but to drain it no fluid came out. That was painful no numbing when done. 9 months since surgery 6 nodes removed. No swelling small incision & no further problems. So there is relief coming soon. I...

      more

      For me it took about 2 months for my swelling to subside. My dr stuck a needle in the area but to drain it no fluid came out. That was painful no numbing when done. 9 months since surgery 6 nodes removed. No swelling small incision & no further problems. So there is relief coming soon. I must agree it felt really freaky trying to put my arm down with the swelling

      Comment

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