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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • Kristine Fonseca Profile

    What is the survival rate of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Stage 2, Triple Negative and what are the side effects of TAC Chemo treatments?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 8 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by...

      more

      Hi Kristine I honestly don't have a definite answer for you regarding the survival rate . I have researched and read conflicting answers. I do know that it depends on the type of breast cancer that you are diagnosed with as well as other issues. However, I hope that you are encouraged by knowing that I celebrated my 5th year of being cancer free on 8/23/11. I was diagnosed with Triple Negative, Invasive and Stage 2A. I was 52 Yrs old when diagnosed and I am now 58.
      I know that God is in control of all our lives therefore I live my life a day at a time staying focused on what is most important to me and what makes me happy no matter what and that is my family and God. Follow your Dr's Advice:) always have hope, faith and love.
      Stay encouraged and enjoy each and everyday!
      Your Sister of Hope!!

      5 comments
    • Cindy Rathbun Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same...

      more

      Don't get caught up in numbers for "survival rate." If those statistics were important, we might never drive a car! I was diagnosed w Stage 2 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Triple Neg in Jan 2008. I had chemo, lumpectomy, and radiation. This past March 2011, I felt a lump in the same breast...diagnosed DCIS, again TNBC. I elected to have bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Post op pathology showed 2 additional types of micro malignant cells waiting to happen. I feel totally at peace with my decision. Life is good. I am back to playing golf and exercising. Yoga and meditation are high priority for staying focused and strong. The path to wellness starts in our own minds...know it, believe it, and you will be better than ever!

      3 comments
  • sally go Profile

    What is the prognosis of Invasive Ductal Cancer Stage 4?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Sally, I was diagnosed with stage 3C cancer last May. I've always tried not to look at survival statistics. When I was diagnosed I made it a point to learn everything I could about my type of cancer. That way I could make a more informed decision about my care. Knowledge is power. Have you...

      more

      Hi Sally, I was diagnosed with stage 3C cancer last May. I've always tried not to look at survival statistics. When I was diagnosed I made it a point to learn everything I could about my type of cancer. That way I could make a more informed decision about my care. Knowledge is power. Have you spoken to your doctor about your treatment options?

      Comment
    • Shelia Combs Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      2 years ago today I was diagnosed with stage 4 invasive ductal carcinoma. 7 surgeries later, 13 months of chemo, 4 weeks of radiation and 12 months of femara, I'm still going strong. I'm not ready to stop just yet. I start more chemo in the next few weeks. But the best medicine I believe is faith...

      more

      2 years ago today I was diagnosed with stage 4 invasive ductal carcinoma. 7 surgeries later, 13 months of chemo, 4 weeks of radiation and 12 months of femara, I'm still going strong. I'm not ready to stop just yet. I start more chemo in the next few weeks. But the best medicine I believe is faith in Jesus and laughter. You have to be able to make fun of yourself and laugh at the cancer. I lost a very good friend just before thanksgiving this year, she lived with stage 4 for 13 years. She is my inspiration.

      Comment
  • Renee Boone Profile

    I am on my second round of chemo and herceptin drug for stage 1 breast cancer and stage 2 lymph node positive her 2. Now I am having pain in stomach and ribcage, want ot know if that's normal. No other pain anywhere else.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 2 answers
    • Karrie Cameron Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Flu-like symptoms may occur after treatment. This includes fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint aches, cough, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose. Diarrhea may occur. You are at a greater risk of having infections due to low whit blood cell count. You may feel some general pain, trouble...

      more

      Flu-like symptoms may occur after treatment. This includes fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint aches, cough, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose. Diarrhea may occur. You are at a greater risk of having infections due to low whit blood cell count. You may feel some general pain, trouble sleeping. Hope this helps. I start my herceptin on jan 30th.

      Comment
    • Kelly Leigh Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I would recommend navigatecancerfoundation.org for excellent answers to questions like this. The nurse I speak with has been an oncology nurse for 29 years and answers are usually back within a day. It is sponsored by LIVESTRONG, no charge to cancer patient. Let us know!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Stage 3c - is this serious without getting treated?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 8 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I have stage 3C as well. Yes, it is extremely important that you get treated! Stage 3C has extensive lymph node involvement. Our stage is one step from stage 4 and could easily turn into 4 if left untreated. Stage four is when breast cancer metastasizes (spreads) to other organs, such as bones,...

      more

      I have stage 3C as well. Yes, it is extremely important that you get treated! Stage 3C has extensive lymph node involvement. Our stage is one step from stage 4 and could easily turn into 4 if left untreated. Stage four is when breast cancer metastasizes (spreads) to other organs, such as bones, liver, brain, lungs, etc. I'm not trying to scare you but I want you to be one of the survivors! Please get treated. Some people say the treatments are worse than the disease. Not true in my opinion. Sure, the treatments don't make you feel good....BUT it doable! And you want to live!

      2 comments
    • Kris Shortridge Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes it is very serious. I am a stage 3 also. Without treatment, the cancer will spread to other organs

      Comment

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