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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 3 - Stage 2

Stage 2 invasive breast cancer is divided into two categories, based upon the size of the tumor and whether or not the cancer has spread to surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 2A

Stage 2A invasive breast cancer can be broken down into a number of different conditions.

It can signify that there is no tumor present, but the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. It can also mean that the tumor is still 2 cm (0.8in) or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes or that the the tumor is between 2cm (0.8in) and 5cm (2in), but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Stage 3c - is this serious without getting treated?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I have stage 3C as well. Yes, it is extremely important that you get treated! Stage 3C has extensive lymph node involvement. Our stage is one step from stage 4 and could easily turn into 4 if left untreated. Stage four is when breast cancer metastasizes (spreads) to other organs, such as bones,...

      more

      I have stage 3C as well. Yes, it is extremely important that you get treated! Stage 3C has extensive lymph node involvement. Our stage is one step from stage 4 and could easily turn into 4 if left untreated. Stage four is when breast cancer metastasizes (spreads) to other organs, such as bones, liver, brain, lungs, etc. I'm not trying to scare you but I want you to be one of the survivors! Please get treated. Some people say the treatments are worse than the disease. Not true in my opinion. Sure, the treatments don't make you feel good....BUT it doable! And you want to live!

      2 comments
    • Kris Shortridge Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Yes it is very serious. I am a stage 3 also. Without treatment, the cancer will spread to other organs

      Comment
  • nancy  wilcox Profile

    Did anyone experience tingling in their fingers when your axillary nodes were inflamed?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 3 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Julie,

      yes with the finger tingles [tended to be thumb and next two fingers] however mine was related to after effects of Sentinel Node Biopsy. I had sentinal node under right armpit removed during surgery and tested for cancer cells while still under anethethic. No cancer cells were found so no...

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      Julie,

      yes with the finger tingles [tended to be thumb and next two fingers] however mine was related to after effects of Sentinel Node Biopsy. I had sentinal node under right armpit removed during surgery and tested for cancer cells while still under anethethic. No cancer cells were found so no further lymph nodes were removed.

      I found in weeks after surgery the rotation/range of motion in right shoulder got more and more limited and the finger tingles started. The physiotherapist i consulted said the finger tingles were related to nerves that had been disturbed/injured during the sentinel node surgery. I had a series of exercises to retain full range of motion in right shoulder and stretching exercises that ensured the lines of nerves etc in my right arm did not tighten and contract. My persisting with these physiotherapy exercises, the tingling would intensify immediately around the exercise period, but over a few months it gradually reduced to the point where it rarely happens these days. The physiotherapist said it was good I had come in within weeks of surgery when the problem first happened as it meant I was able to stretch scar tissue and nerves so they did not "set" in a tight position that caused irritation. Softening scars and lengthening nerves is harder work the longer you leave it.
      Tingles in right arm and right fingers can be associated with heart disease.
      Tingles in fingers especially in your dominant hand can be associated with carpel tunnel syndrome [over use by repetitive actions often cause it].
      Just reminding you that finger tingles can be associated with other things such as that or even constant sleeping on one side to ease pressure on breast cancer surgery side can also cause nerve compression and finger tingling if you are heavy, or even if you aren't, if you are constantly sleeping on one shoulder.

      Comment
    • Julie Dalton Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hello Nancy,
      I'm not sure whether I can be of any help, but I'll certainly try. Since I don't know how far you are on with your Chemo and/or Radiotherapy sessions I'm not able to form a proper judgement, but on what little I've read about tingling in your fingers when your Axillary nodes are...

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      Hello Nancy,
      I'm not sure whether I can be of any help, but I'll certainly try. Since I don't know how far you are on with your Chemo and/or Radiotherapy sessions I'm not able to form a proper judgement, but on what little I've read about tingling in your fingers when your Axillary nodes are inflamed all I can tel you is this; I had a mastectomy with 10 nodes removed last October. I did all the Exercises that they tell you to do after the Op in order to keep a full range of motion in the shoulder and arm area. Three months later, and during my Chemo sessions I discovered I had the condition they call Lymphoedema. This is brought on by loss of the Lymph nodes as I'm sure you know. Anyhow all I can tell you is that my hand is quite severely numb and tingly all of the time so obviously the nodes and the lymph and hand area are all connected and very very complimentary to each other. More than we realise I think. If you'd like to keep in touch or have any more questions then I'd be only too pleased to hear from you - my email address is; daltonfox@btinternet.com and my name is Julie. Bye for now. Take care, Julie

      1 comment
  • judy wilson Profile

    Are grade and stage of cancer the same?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Jody  Feil Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      From what I know, the stage refers to how much the tumor has spread, while the grade refers to how abnormal the cancer cells are. So you could have a smaller tumor that has not really spread, like in Stage I, but it could be made up of aggressive, more abnormal cells, which would give it a...

      more

      From what I know, the stage refers to how much the tumor has spread, while the grade refers to how abnormal the cancer cells are. So you could have a smaller tumor that has not really spread, like in Stage I, but it could be made up of aggressive, more abnormal cells, which would give it a higher grade.

      1 comment
  • Jackie Valencia Profile

    How long can you live with stage 4 breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into...

      more

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into Adjuvant! Online again, put in your log on name and password, click on breast cancer, input all your stats from your histopathology report and hey presto, up comes the survival stats for your particular situation. You can play with the reporting data by selecting different treatments to see what stats come up - which ones extend life and those that don't. You can also present your stats in different ways eg., how long the disease statistically reduces ones overall lifespan, how long statistically as breast cancer specific free, and so on. I found Adjuvant! Online the most useful tool especially as many on line forums on this issue tend to present [to my mind] overly optimistic anecdotes because of course only those who survive are here to post. Similarly I found most health care professionals prefer to turn themselves inside out than give a straight forward answer. Their usual line is everyone is different/what would be know/it depends - then they always tell you some uplifting anecdote about someone who is still going after 23 years! That of course is true - as far as it goes - but the reality is the survival stats are well established and while there can be enormous variation, some patients such as myself find it enormously informative and empowering to know exactly what the stats say is the normal or average course of my disease. Patients right to know is not , however, given the respect legally,ethically and morally entitled due. If you are over 18 and not so mentally ill you cannot make rational decisions for yourself, if you want to know this information, then you are entitled to it.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies...

      more

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies there are awesome.

      2 comments

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