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Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

We will now cover the five stages of breast cancer and what to expect from each stage.

Cancer is assessed by stages ranging from 0-4; each stage represents a progression of the cancer. As the complexity of the cancer intensifies, so does the treatment required to fight it. Breast cancer is assigned to a stage based on where it began in the breast and how much of the breast and other parts of the body are affected by it.

Remember, the stage of cancer is separate from the tumor grade, which we discussed in Subchapter 3.2.

We will also review the types of cancer. First, covering the more common types of breast cancer, but also the unusual diagnoses like triple negative breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and cancer during pregnancy.

Your responsibility, as discussed in Chapter 4, is to develop a support team, of family or friends, that will comfort and encourage you in this time.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Do you all realize that if someone Google searches your name in quotes all your posts to this site will come up? I am concerned! I am job hunting!

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2006

      Greetings Anoymous,

      I am so thankful that God has given me another chance at life. After being diagnosed with Triple Negative stage 2 A grade 3 Breast Cancer {51/2} years ago. I promised myself and God that since I was chosen to make a difference I would share any and all information about the...

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      Greetings Anoymous,

      I am so thankful that God has given me another chance at life. After being diagnosed with Triple Negative stage 2 A grade 3 Breast Cancer {51/2} years ago. I promised myself and God that since I was chosen to make a difference I would share any and all information about the journey I had to go through to get where I am today. Most importantly for me is that I want the world to know that being diagnosed with breast cancer is not a death sentence and that early detection is the key. I will always be willing to share my story with anyone on or off this site. And if any employer would not accept you for employment because of your diagnoses I beleive will reap what they sow! None of us asked to be diagnosed with breast cancer and know one knowes what is manifesting in their bodies. It's so sad that public records information is shared on the internet so why not share informtion that could save a life. Stay encouraged. I promise you that I will keep you in my prayers as you continue to seek employment. I feel in my heart that you will be blessed to find a job for who you are, including your skills and not because you were diagnosed with breast cancer. By the way after I was diagnosed I also started having luncheons, bake sales silent auctions and educational events at work in October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month in order to raise monies for Cancer Organizations and to bring awareness to my females and male co-workers. To my surprise the participation by my co-workers continues to be100% and the monies raised grows higher each year. Keep me posted, Love and Blessings Your Proud Sister Of Hope!!

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Yes Yes ladies!!!!! I am so proud to be a survivor!!! Very well said!!! I feel thankful everyday to come through all this and I don't mind telling the world. If an employer has a problem with that...I wouldn't want to work for them anyway!!!

      Comment
  • Vicky Starkie Profile

    What is grade 3 breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 3 answers
  • Darla Elliott Pruitt Profile

    I completed the AC for IDC breast cancer. 12 treatments of Taxol is next. I Didn't nt want to do taxol. I can't go to the neuropathy in my feet) or chemistry bran or more sore mouth. What is the real risk with 1A breast cancer???

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Your doctor has ordered what they feel is right for your cancer. As to those side effects you may or may not experience them as everyone is different. I did a TC regimen and those were listed as possible side effects with it too but I never had any. Talk with your doctor(s) about your concerns.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      As much as you want answers, we don't have them. If you read through the PDR about any drug on the market, the side effects will blow you over. Just because there are pages of side effect for Taxol, it still does not mean you will suffer those. As Betti says, we are all different. Usually...

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      As much as you want answers, we don't have them. If you read through the PDR about any drug on the market, the side effects will blow you over. Just because there are pages of side effect for Taxol, it still does not mean you will suffer those. As Betti says, we are all different. Usually what will happen, if you start developing the more bothersome side effects, they will discontinue the rest of the treatments. Again, we can't tell you the risk of recurrence for your particular type of breast cancer. You are just looking at one part of your diagnosis at a 1A. There are so many more factors that are now available that put the real meaning of your diagnosis in play. There is grade, hormone status, did you have an onco DX test to see what your chances of recurrence really were? If I were you, I would get a second or third opinion. There is nothing wrong with that. It would give you peace of mind to get more information. You need to talk to another oncologist's opinion outside the practice of your present oncologist. It will help you make better decisions. Please keep us posted. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment

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