loading... close

Types & Stages

 
Types & Stages

Chapter: 5 - Types & Stages

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

We will now cover the five stages of breast cancer and what to expect from each stage.

Cancer is assessed by stages ranging from 0-4; each stage represents a progression of the cancer. As the complexity of the cancer intensifies, so does the treatment required to fight it. Breast cancer is assigned to a stage based on where it began in the breast and how much of the breast and other parts of the body are affected by it.

Remember, the stage of cancer is separate from the tumor grade, which we discussed in Subchapter 3.2.

We will also review the types of cancer. First, covering the more common types of breast cancer, but also the unusual diagnoses like triple negative breast cancer, inflammatory breast cancer, and cancer during pregnancy.

Your responsibility, as discussed in Chapter 4, is to develop a support team, of family or friends, that will comfort and encourage you in this time.

Related Questions

  • Katelynn Kiemeyer Profile

    What is cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 1 answer
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      There are educational videos on this site that are really helpful and give a good overview of what cancer is. Just click "Learn" at the top or go to http://beyondtheshock.com/learn/3

      Comment
  • Diane Sakowski Profile

    5.6 cm. stage? Surgery in days. Scared

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women...

      more

      Diane,
      I felt exactly the same as all the other wonderful women here. I was terrified and I think we all are but for a variety of reasons. I think most prevelent is fear of the unknown. Once you have your treatment plan laid out, you know where you are going. There are tons of stories of women having surgery, going through their treatments and coming out as a victorious survivor! You WILL make it through this journey and be a survivor just like we are. I can assure you, there are good endings to breast cancer. I am a 5 year survivor and just had another GOOD check-up this past Wednesday. I wish we could all get together and give you a little sack of our collective courage. For me, just as Rita said, the surgery.... in my case a mastectomy.... was NOT that bad! The chemo. again, was not that bad. As my oncologist told me...."This is NOT your mother or grandmother's chemotherapy." You stop people from telling you negative stories.... don't listen to them.
      Please remember, we are all here to help support everyone going through this journey. Positive thoughts only.... put on your pink warrior outfit.... and march with determination. Do not be afraid to ask questions of your team, they are there to help you. You WILL triumph as so many women have before you. God's blessings, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      My tumor was 7.3 cm I am stage 3. Last year I had surgery, chemo, and radiation. Today the cancer is gone. I jave to be villigent about my check up but today No ca

      Comment
  • Edward Smith Profile

    At my post mastectomy consultation, what can I expect? I am stage 1 with no residual tissue and nodes are clean.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Betsy Krueger Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      I also had my staples taken out at that point. I was amazed that it didn't hurt! Of course there's numbness at the mastectomy site, but this was the first time I realized what that meant. The numbness around the scar is still there, but the area where I have no feeling is smaller.

      This was...

      more

      I also had my staples taken out at that point. I was amazed that it didn't hurt! Of course there's numbness at the mastectomy site, but this was the first time I realized what that meant. The numbness around the scar is still there, but the area where I have no feeling is smaller.

      This was also the point at which I was handed off to the oncologist to discuss treatment--chemo, radiation. My cancer is DCIS, and I didn't have to have any more treatment. My DCIS had wide margins, and no node involvement.

      Hope it went well for you.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      You may get some further pathology results and the surgeon will check the mastectomy site. Depending on what sort of reconstruction you are having, if any, this will be discussed as well. Good luck

      Comment
  • Jackie Valencia Profile

    How long can you live with stage 4 breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Coco Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into...

      more

      Dear Jackie,

      If you go to Adjuvant! Online - make sure you have obtained a copy of your histopathology report and have it beside you - register on the site - anyone can register as a Dr - its not illegal to do so - and get your log on - confirm your log on via your email - then log into Adjuvant! Online again, put in your log on name and password, click on breast cancer, input all your stats from your histopathology report and hey presto, up comes the survival stats for your particular situation. You can play with the reporting data by selecting different treatments to see what stats come up - which ones extend life and those that don't. You can also present your stats in different ways eg., how long the disease statistically reduces ones overall lifespan, how long statistically as breast cancer specific free, and so on. I found Adjuvant! Online the most useful tool especially as many on line forums on this issue tend to present [to my mind] overly optimistic anecdotes because of course only those who survive are here to post. Similarly I found most health care professionals prefer to turn themselves inside out than give a straight forward answer. Their usual line is everyone is different/what would be know/it depends - then they always tell you some uplifting anecdote about someone who is still going after 23 years! That of course is true - as far as it goes - but the reality is the survival stats are well established and while there can be enormous variation, some patients such as myself find it enormously informative and empowering to know exactly what the stats say is the normal or average course of my disease. Patients right to know is not , however, given the respect legally,ethically and morally entitled due. If you are over 18 and not so mentally ill you cannot make rational decisions for yourself, if you want to know this information, then you are entitled to it.

      Comment
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies...

      more

      Hi Jackie, I'm stage IIIc and have spoken to several stage IV ladies that have been living with cancer for years. There's an awesome discussion group on breastcancer.org that has helped me a great deal. It's nice to be able to share your story with someone that's been in your shoes. The ladies there are awesome.

      2 comments

Educational Video

Personal Story

Related Topics

Looking for another topic?
Use the search box in the top right.

Footer 1

An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

spread the word