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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 4 - Biopsy

A biopsy is a diagnostic procedure in which cells are removed from a suspicious area to check for the presence of breast cancer. There are three types of biopsy: fine needle aspiration, core needle biopsy, and surgical biopsy.

Let’s discuss the different types in greater detail.

Fine Needle Aspiration
(FNA)/Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNABx)

If the lump is easily accessible, or if the doctor suspects that it may be a fluid-filled cystic lump, the doctor may choose to conduct a fine needle aspiration (FNA). During this procedure, the lump should collapse once the fluid inside has been drawn and discarded. Sometimes, an ultrasound is used to help your doctor guide the needle to the exact site. If the lump persists, the radiologist or surgeon will perform a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNABx), a similar procedure using the needle to obtain cells from the lump for examination.

Core Needle Biopsy
Core needle biopsy is the procedure to remove a small amount of tissue from the breasts with a larger “core” needle. Similar to fine needle aspiration, an ultrasound might be used to help your doctor guide the needle to the exact site. Once removed, the suspicious area tissue will be examined for traces of cancer.

Surgical Biopsy
(also known as wide local excision)
During a surgical (or wide local excision) biopsy, the doctor will remove all or part of the lump from the breast as well as a small amount of normal-looking tissue. This procedure is often performed in a hospital with the patient under local anesthesia. If the lump cannot be easily felt, an ultrasound might be used to help guide your doctor to the suspicious area. Once removed, the abnormal tissue will be examined for traces of cancer. The surrounding margin, or small amount of normal–looking tissue, will be examined to determine if the cancer has been completely removed.

Many times after core and surgical biopsies, a marker is placed internally at the biopsy site. This is done so that if further surgery is required, the surgeon can more easily locate the abnormal area.

Related Questions

  • laura tracey Profile

    is it normal to keep having reconstuctive surgery after bil.mast

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Life is Good! Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      My plastic surgeon told me reconstruction is a marathon, not a sprint! There are many steps to the process and it can take a while. Mine was a 9 month process. However, it was worth it in the end. 9 years later, I am still satisfied with the results. It isnt perfect or the same but became a...

      more

      My plastic surgeon told me reconstruction is a marathon, not a sprint! There are many steps to the process and it can take a while. Mine was a 9 month process. However, it was worth it in the end. 9 years later, I am still satisfied with the results. It isnt perfect or the same but became a "new normal". Good luck to you and keep the questions coming! Take care.

      Comment
    • melissa perlman Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      What does keep having surgery mean? After bil mast, so far, I've had the implants, then nipple reconstruction 3 months later. In 2 weeks will be nipple tattoo. That's it, unless complications arise.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hi everyone! I'm going for recontruction surgery today after lumpectomy. I'm kind of scared but positive. My parh rep after node surgery and lumpectomy showed chemo was100% effective. Smiles, jayme

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      Another walk down the road of recovery. Prayers are with you.

      1 comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Jayme! YOU GO GIRL! Fabulous news and getting on with life. Each step is another leap back to normal. YAHOOOO! We celebrate with you.
      Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    has anyone had an MRI guided core biopsy done if so how painful

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 9 answers
    • View all 9 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Minimal pain just a pinch. Very uncomfortable positioning. Was more worried about what the results would be.

      Comment
    • anonymous Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      I had it and don't remember any pain at all. Awkward positioning if I recall, but it's temporary. Good Luck!

      Comment
  • Mary Chase Profile

    What is the difference between DIEP and TRAM flap?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      A tram takes your abdominal tissue and muscle to form the breast mound, uses blood supply from abdomen,tissue and muscle is tunneled up to chest. Diep removes abdominal

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      A Diep they remove the abdominal tissue then form breast mound. The abdominal muscle is cut into, vessels are extracted, then muscle sutured, vessels then attached to breast mound. Tram removes majority of abdominal muscle, diep allows it to remain intact.

      Comment

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