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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 3 - Diagnostic Methods

Breast Health Awareness
Becoming familiar with your breasts and knowing what is normal for you will help you detect changes or abnormalities, if they occur. This is breast health awareness.

The initial sign of breast cancer may involve a new lump or change in the breast. A new nipple inversion, an area of significant irritation or redness, dimpling or thickening of the breast skin, and persistent breast pain or discomfort are reasons to seek prompt medical evaluation.

Breast Self-Exam
A breast self-exam is an examination of the breasts for changes or abnormalities. A self breast-exam should be performed monthly and any changes or abnormalities should be discussed with your doctor or physician. For more information about how to perform a breast self-exam, please visit http://nbcf.org.

Clinical Breast Exam
A clinical breast exam is an exam preformed by a qualified nurse or doctor; they will check for lumps or other physical changes in the breast. The goal is to detect breast cancer in its earliest stages, either by evaluating the patient’s symptoms or finding breast abnormalities.

Mammogram
Having a regularly scheduled mammogram, the standard diagnostic scan, is especially important. A mammogram is an x-ray; the breast is exposed to a small dose of iodizing radiation that produces an image of the breast tissue.

If your mammogram or a clinical exam detects a suspicious site, further investigation is always necessary. Although lumps are usually non-cancerous, the only way to be certain is to obtain additional tests, such as an ultrasound. If a solid mass appears on the ultrasound, your radiologist may recommend a biopsy, a procedure in which cells are removed from a suspicious area to check for the presence of cancer.

Early Detection Plan®
Because early detection is so vital, the National Breast Cancer Foundation offers women the Early Detection Plan®, an online tool that helps remind you to schedule a breast self-exam, clinical breast exam, and mammogram. Because of the demands of everyday life, it’s easy to forget or even fear these exams; which is why this program exists. You can subscribe to receive alerts by e-mail, text message, and even through an RSS feed. It only takes 60 seconds to create an Early Detection Plan, but it could save your life.

Ultrasound and MRI
As we mentioned previously, when a suspicious site is detected in your breast, your doctor may require an ultrasound of the breast tissue. An ultrasound is a scan that uses sound waves to paint a picture of what’s going on inside of the body. Ultrasounds are helpful when a lump is easily felt and can be used to further evaluate any abnormalities discovered on a mammogram.

Each exam will provide a different perspective. When your initial exams are not conclusive, your doctor may recommend an MRI to asses the extent of the disease. An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a scan of the body that uses magnetic energy and radio waves, rather than radiation, to view organs and tissues in the body.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    I had a mammogram last week that read normal, but I have a palpable lump in the 11 o'clock area in the outer quadrant. It's about the size of a grape, non movable, firm, and tender. I have a VERY strong family history of various cancers. What next?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 5 years 14 answers
    • View all 14 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my...

      more

      Hi Amy, while mammograms detect a good deal of lumps...there are too many that are missed. I was always very diligent in having my mammograms with ultrasounds as well. Due to micro calcifications found, I was having one every six months so they could "monitor" any changes. Five months after my last "clean" mammo....I found my lump. It was firm, my breast was swollen, itchy, and my nipple had inverted. I ended up having a biopsy and was diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Cancer. After all my testing was completed I was told I was in stage 3C. My cancer should have been detected so much sooner. Like Sharon, it was missed. You're welcome to read my profile story. While most lumps end up being benign....you always want to get each lump tested thoroughly! I agree with asking for an MRI. Then additional testing if needed. We must be proactive with our health and make our doctors listen!! Hugs Amy & keep us posted.

      2 comments
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Go back to your doc and ask for an ultrasound and/or MRI followed by a biopsy if needed and if they say no, go for a second opinion. If you are not satisfied with the answers you get don't stop till you are. It's your life! Best of luck, I wish you the best!

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    i have a lump under my underarm could this be cancer? i am going to the doctor's this week.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 2 answers
    • Anne Marie jacintho Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2003

      We have lymph nodes under our arms that sometimes become swollen if you have an infection. It is good to get any lump where ever it maybe checked out by a doctor.

      Comment
    • Cathy Wadkins Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My friend had lymphphoma and my brother , never under estimate that never assume if you question get answers

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How to find free mammogram

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Call a women's clinic. Call a hospital call American cancer society. Google it and your city

      Comment
    • Brandi Mixon Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      So many good answers! Your doctors office or mammo place should have imfo. All the ones in my town do.

      Comment
  • Tammy B Profile

    Had an MRI yesterday. This morning I woke up with terrible burning sensation while urinating. Has anyone else experienced this?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Tammy,
      It could be from the contrast dye. I would drink a LOT of water today. I would also put in a call to the MRI office and tell them. (extra points for drinking cranberry juice).
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I have had 2 MRIs and have not experiences this but everyone is different- check with your doctor.

      Comment

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