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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    My mom was just diagnosed after needle biopsy. She already had an MRI scheduled after that, should she still get the MRI done? What does the MRI diagnose at this point/is it necessary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    about 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Mary Navarro Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Yes she should still get the MRI, because I think it shows if the cancer has spread and where it has spread. Plus, it might determine if she's going to do treatment first or surgery.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Yes, the MRI shows a lot more. It will show if it is anywhere else in the breastes.

      1 comment
  • trish tidwell Profile

    i have been cancer free for 13 years, do i have to get diagnatic mamagram for the rest of my life

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 3 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I was diagnosed in 2013 and had a unilateral mastectomy. I get a yearly mammogram on my remaining breast and it is considered my annual screening unless something is being felt in my breast or I'm called back for additional imaging after my screening study shows an abnormality and I was told...

      more

      I was diagnosed in 2013 and had a unilateral mastectomy. I get a yearly mammogram on my remaining breast and it is considered my annual screening unless something is being felt in my breast or I'm called back for additional imaging after my screening study shows an abnormality and I was told then it would be considered diagnostic but only because of that and not my prior diagnosis. I just went on Medicare in November and found part of my charges were denied as they had to put a modifier code to the bilateral since there are no insurance codes for a unilateral screening. Check with your ordering Dr's. office and see why they order it as a diagnostic rather than a screening exam. I might add Medicare paid for mine it's just the clinic put through a couple of items they denied; Radiologist's report of "negative" and my name added to their system to send me a yearly reminder notice.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I have one breast left. I get a mammogram every year. Whether they call it diagnostic or screening, I don't know. I am on medicare with supplemental insurance and I never get a bill.
      As long as I have a breast, I get a mammogram. As Betti says, check with your care provider as to what...

      more

      I have one breast left. I get a mammogram every year. Whether they call it diagnostic or screening, I don't know. I am on medicare with supplemental insurance and I never get a bill.
      As long as I have a breast, I get a mammogram. As Betti says, check with your care provider as to what they are ordering. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is 11 mm early breast cancer

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 3 answers
    • Trisha Muller Quinn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2014

      Yes!!! Your lucky you found it , So hopefully for you they will just remove the lump and you make just have radiation but whatever your treatment ... Relax .. And be thankful you found it so it can be "fixed"!!!!good luck ...Mine was 8cms stage 3b and a year out from surgery enjoying life :)))

      Comment
    • Nancy Ries Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Eleven millimeters is small and caught early. I was stage 1a breast cancer when diagnosed three years ago. My cancer was 3 millimeters. I did radiation and I am on medication for five years because the cancer was hormone positive.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just turned 40, have always had lumpy breasts. I had previously been diagnosed with fibrocystic disease. I set up my first mammogram for this Friday. After my breast exam, my dr gave me a referral for a surgeon as well. Should this concern me?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • terri best Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Don't worry yourself about it. Get your mammogram and the results and go from there. Your doctor doesn't know anything until after you get your results if your doctor was that worried you would think they would've addressed their concerns. Please keep up informed. We care about what you're going...

      more

      Don't worry yourself about it. Get your mammogram and the results and go from there. Your doctor doesn't know anything until after you get your results if your doctor was that worried you would think they would've addressed their concerns. Please keep up informed. We care about what you're going through.

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I agree with what Terri said. He may be wanting to remove the lumps. Don't worry yourself. Prayers to you.

      Comment

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