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Diagnosis

 
Diagnosis

Chapter: 4 - Diagnosis

Subchapter: 2 - Why?

- Why do I have breast cancer?
- What could I have done differently?

There are some questions that cannot be answered; even so, they are not unreasonable questions to ask. Most people ask them. Just remember, doctors almost never pin down a single, precise cause for cancer.

It is very important to educate yourself about what’s ahead. By doing this, you will keep loved ones informed and help ease your own concern.

A support team of your family, friends and other breast cancer patients is extremely important. They will strengthen you through this season and encourage to make the most of your life, today.

You also have your medical team; this will typically include your personal physician, surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiologist and others. Their attention, care, and expertise are aimed at diagnosing and treating breast cancer in a way that is most effective for you.

Related Questions

  • Charles Knisley Profile

    The doctor located a lump in my wife's breast. He said the xrays revealed it was benign, so therefore he did nothing after. Is this correct?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      An x-ray cannot determine if a lump in benign or malignant. Only a biopsy can determine that.

      Comment
    • Surf  Momma Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had the same thing happen to me. 2 years later- I know had cancer! You need her to get a biopsy

      Comment
  • Alysia Krafel Profile

    I just got my diagnosis, Stage 1 invasive ductal tumor. I am overwhelmed with anxiety. Has this happened to any of you folks?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 1 Patient
    over 5 years 13 answers
    • View all 13 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Hi Alysia, Let me say first, if you suffer from anxiety and you don't already take a little pill to help with that, call your doctor and ask for it. I was formally diagnosed with Stage 2A invasive ductal cancer with a 2.7 cm turmor that we all could see and feel in March. When my visit to the...

      more

      Hi Alysia, Let me say first, if you suffer from anxiety and you don't already take a little pill to help with that, call your doctor and ask for it. I was formally diagnosed with Stage 2A invasive ductal cancer with a 2.7 cm turmor that we all could see and feel in March. When my visit to the oncology surgeon for a consultation was ended with core biopsies at the end of the day in his office, I told him I had to have something to get me to the surgery. He asked me what I had used in the past and he smiled and said he could do that and prescribed me 15 mild zanex. BLESS HIS HEART. I too, suffer from anxiety so I know how you feel. Waiting is surreal. I felt like I had awakened in someone else's nightmare. My husband and I had just retired, rekindled our marriage and having a great life-enter cancer. So, stick with us, ask all your questions, read the little learn section on this site and you'll scoot right through this. Hang tough, get your meds, and talk it out if that takes the edge off. Hugs and peace to you tonight. Jo :-D

      2 comments
    • Kansas Girl  Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      I was diagnosed on Sept 6 with IDC - Stage 1. I'm 42 - was found on my annual mammogram. Absolutely no history of any type of cancer in my family. I had a lumpectomy on Oct. 22 and sentinel node biopsy. I fortunately do not have any node involvement. I'm triple positive and have completed 2 of 6...

      more

      I was diagnosed on Sept 6 with IDC - Stage 1. I'm 42 - was found on my annual mammogram. Absolutely no history of any type of cancer in my family. I had a lumpectomy on Oct. 22 and sentinel node biopsy. I fortunately do not have any node involvement. I'm triple positive and have completed 2 of 6 chemo treatments. Then will have radiation. I was completely blindsided and completed overwhelmed with the diagnosis. Still am on many days. We are fortunate -stage 1 is very treatable and very curable. You are very fortunate it was caught early. This is a great site and I thank God that I found it. It has helped tremendously.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have had an ultrasound an it identified that I have a hypoechoic round lesion with solid appearance measuring 6x 5mm. Is this related to having very dense fibroglandular tissue and therefore no worry and nothing else to be done. Thank you

    Asked by anonymous

    about 3 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Betti's right, we don't know. Your doctor or radiologist should be discussing the findings with you. Dense breast tissue can make diagnosis more difficult. Was there any mention of doing a biopsy since this was a solid mass? I would be requesting one if this were my breast. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      You need to discuss the results with your doctor and get some clarification on what it means as we aren't doctors.

      Comment
  • hithere hithere Profile

    How old do you have to be to see an oncologist?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      How old are you?

      Comment
    • Marianne R. Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      It isn't about age it is about need. I needed mine onc at 58.

      Comment

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