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Breast Cancer

 
Breast Cancer

Chapter: 3 - Breast Cancer

Subchapter: 1 - What is Cancer?

What is Cancer?
Healthy cells are the basic building blocks of all tissue and organs in the body. But when cell DNA (the cell’s wiring) is damaged, mutated cells begin to rapidly reproduce without following the pre-wired plan.

Aggressive cell growth can form a tumor (or mass of tissue) that, like each individual cell, does not function as originally intended. These abnormal cells or groups of cells can progress into the disease known as cancer.

Cancer Origins
Breast cancer usually begins either where the milk is being produced, the lobules, or in the milk ducts.

Lobules
Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) is a pre-cancerous condition that forms and is contained in the lobules. Invasive lobular carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops and breaks through the lobules, with the potential to spread to other areas of the body.

Milk Ducts
Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) is a type of cancer that forms in the milk ducts and is considered non–invasive because it has not spread to any surrounding tissue. Once the cancer has spread beyond the milk ducts, it is known as ductal carcinoma.

Less frequently, breast cancer can originate in the stromal tissue– the fatty and fibrous connective tissue of the breast.

Prognosis
Treating breast cancer as soon as it’s discovered is very important. If left untreated, the cancer cells may invade healthy breast tissue or lymph nodes. Once in the lymph system, cancer can spread more easily to other parts of the body.

Related Questions

  • ivy leahan Profile

    What is a P53 test?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 2 answers
    • Tiffani Warila Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Like Morgan said, it's another type of genetic test. I had it done at the same time as the BRCA 1&2 tests. It can tell if you are at a higher risk for other types of cancer. I had it done since I was diagnosed young (29). I was negative for all 3. Sometimes insurance will not cover the p53...

      more

      Like Morgan said, it's another type of genetic test. I had it done at the same time as the BRCA 1&2 tests. It can tell if you are at a higher risk for other types of cancer. I had it done since I was diagnosed young (29). I was negative for all 3. Sometimes insurance will not cover the p53 test. I was told it would be a couple hundred $ if not covered, although my insurance company did ok it.

      Comment
    • Morgan Moser Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      It's a type of genetic testing, I went for genetic testing today and they touched a little bit about it. They didn't do it today but did test for the BRCA 1&2.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I just had a double mastectomy last week for bilateral breast cancer. My left breast was progesterone and my right breast was HER2 . Do you think I need to have chemo now?

    Asked by anonymous

    over 3 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hey debbie.

      I was triple positive and stage 3 in 2013. I did it all. Chemo and rads.

      Remember, we all do the best we can.

      Be brave as you learn more.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That is a question you need to discuss with your oncologist.

      Comment
  • Jody Feil Profile

    Is it a good idea to do the HCG hormone diet after having breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 7 years Answer
  • Thumb avatar default

    i have stage 1 invasive ductual carcinoma gyn oncoligist recommed my ovaries be removed due to estraogen is making the cancer grow i am 46

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 6 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • jc lin Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I will have my ovaries re,over next year after I complete my treatment. I am stage 3. I have three beautiful kids, remove my ovaries is not an issue, I was told it will cut down the recurrence rate for me. Good luck.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      If you do not feel comfortable with this recommendation, please seek a second opinion. Whenever you receive a diagnosis that is a darn big deal, I think it is always best to have another doctor evaluate a treatment plan. It is difficult to say what should take place without knowing all about...

      more

      If you do not feel comfortable with this recommendation, please seek a second opinion. Whenever you receive a diagnosis that is a darn big deal, I think it is always best to have another doctor evaluate a treatment plan. It is difficult to say what should take place without knowing all about your case. There are so many things that go into making a treatment decision. The type, stage, grade and ER, PR, Her2 status is critical. You may have the type of numbers that just yell "Yatze!" (get those ovaries out of there)
      I would definately get a second opinion. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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An Early Detection Plan (EDP) significantly increases the chances of surviving breast cancer.

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