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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Sandra Allen Profile

    i am having a double mastectomy in jan do you have depression afterwards

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 2 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the...

      more

      Sandra,
      Unless you have a problem with clinical depression it usually doesn't come along with the territory. You could have some problems feeling --down-- because it is kind of a big deal both physically and a bit mentally. Not knowing how important body image is to each and every woman, the realization of the loss of a breast means different things to different women. It is difficult to predict how you will feel. My breasts are small and I didn't particularly have any attachment to them in regards to body image. I just wanted to get rid of the breast cancer and was very happy to get rid of the body part that contained it.
      I chose not to have reconstruction and have done well with a prosthesis. I was 59 when diagnosed and made this decision. It is different if women are diagnosed in their 20's, 30's, 40's etc. A large percentage of them have reconstruction which sounds like it is a long, procedure and not very comfortable. Anyway.... as for depression, if you tend to get depressed or feel down, it may be a problem but I can't say it is as a matter of fact. Hang in there darlin' you are getting rid of a lousy sneaky disease and that IS the most important thing. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and...

      more

      Well said Sharon, as usual. I had a double mastectomy about a year ago and I had very large breasts, it was a bit sad to say goodbye to them as they have been responsible for many free drinks in my life haha. But overall I am so glad I did it. I am going through reconstruction at the moment and you are right Sharon it is long and uncomfortable but I would do it all again. The part of the mastectomy that I found difficult was the recovery and not being to do the things I was used to doing like driving and showering on my own. Good luck to you Sandra, you will be fine and like Sharon said you are getting rid of an awful illness and it is the best way to do it. Let us know are you going as you progress. Cheers

      Comment
  • NancyStradley- Pezzi Profile

    Looking for someone who has had stage 2 Infiltrating lobular carcinoma

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 3 years Answer
  • Krista Locklear Profile

    Hi i am 15 and I am scared I might have breast cancer.one seems bigger one of my nipples has a scally itchy rash my shoulders hurt and I sometimes feel little pain in my breast.call my doctor or not could my breast just be growing?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    8 months 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      Hi Sweetie, I am not a doctor, but I can tell you that you would be too YOUNG to have breast cancer, sounds to me like you have hormonal things going on, and that your breasts are growing. Stay away from processed foods, chemicals and exercise. Get your YEARLY check ups.. and .. Trust in the...

      more

      Hi Sweetie, I am not a doctor, but I can tell you that you would be too YOUNG to have breast cancer, sounds to me like you have hormonal things going on, and that your breasts are growing. Stay away from processed foods, chemicals and exercise. Get your YEARLY check ups.. and .. Trust in the Lord... XO

      2 comments
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Keep track of when they hurt and symptoms if still hurting etc go to your dr. If you are really scared go now( soon). It will make you feel better.

      Comment
  • Naphi Lyngdoh Profile

    i'm 19 and i have lumps in my breast, the mammogram result was normal but the lumps are growing bigger day by day!! can mammogram detect 100% breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 2 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • L S Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      Mine did not show on the mammogram. You have to get a biopsy to be 100% sure.

      1 comment
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Mine didn't show.

      Comment

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