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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Is it possible to donate your hair and make a wig for a friend?

    Asked by anonymous

    Family Member or Loved One
    over 3 years 2 answers
    • Alice Klobukowski Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I'm not sure if you can do this as you describe. There are groups that take donated hair for children's wigs. Your friend might find that the man-made wigs are more comfortable and easier to care for. If you decided to donate, check first for the length needed and how it is to be handled.

      Comment
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Wigs for kids is a great place to donate hair.. As for donating for a particular wig, from the research I've done it takes more than 1 head if hair to make a wig... Why I'm not sure.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How do you know if a lump is cancerous?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 2 answers
    • Kelly Smith Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3B Patient

      A biopsy will be able to determine of a lump is malignant.

      Comment
    • Nikol Vega Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      They will usually do a biopsy to determine if it's cancerous

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I have eczema pretty bad. Will it get worse with chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 3 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • laura  bailey Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hi Traci, I also have eczema (legs, back and face). If yours reacts like mine, then it will go away during chemo. I had a complete secession of that condition. That was one positive during chemo, completely clear of eczema! (It does come back after). Good luck! Laura

      1 comment
    • Alice Klobukowski Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I have a tendency to get eczema. I think the steroids you take before, during, and after might help. I did get a bad rash on my scalp after one chemo. The doctor prescribed an antibiotic for that, so that wasn't eczema. Do you have any allergies to tape? If so, ask the nurses to use gauze...

      more

      I have a tendency to get eczema. I think the steroids you take before, during, and after might help. I did get a bad rash on my scalp after one chemo. The doctor prescribed an antibiotic for that, so that wasn't eczema. Do you have any allergies to tape? If so, ask the nurses to use gauze and paper tape instead their usual supplies.

      Comment
  • Sue Rice Profile

    Stage 4 HER2+ ER+ --> Treatment is taking forever. Others finish, but I keep going. Do any others feel lonely, frustrated and depressed while watching others finish? I'm stable, but only if I continue treatment.

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 4 Patient
    over 4 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Donna Ginnings Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2001

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives...

      more

      Sue, I'm stage 4 and have been since 2007. I was able to stop treatment for 3 years because of no sign of disease after first year of treatment. A miracle from God for sure. Currently I have been on chemo since July 2010. I just look at it as a small inconvenience and enjoy every day God gives me with my daughters. Trust in the Lord, he will see you through. So many good treatment options out there that let you carry on a normal life. God never promised us life would be easy, but he did promise nerver to leave us or forsake us. may God bless you!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. ...

      more

      Sue, I sure can understand how it could be very depressing to watch the other types of breast cancer women walk out the door. Your oncologist's office probably has some recommendations for support groups in your area where you could meet a pal who is dealing with the same issues you are having. When I was going through treatment, there was a young woman on the other side of the states who was a horse-gal, just like me. We had a great time emailing each other even though she was young enough to be my daughter. It was so welcome to find somebody else who was in the "same leaky boat" as I was. It made the treatment time much easier to take. You just need a "chemo-pal." This has become a way-too-common disease to there are lots of us out there. I would try to find a support group and maybe one person who you just click with. . Be sure and talk to your doctor and Onco. nurses about how you are feeling. Ask them if they can point you in the direction of a support group. You sound like a very social person and needs some buddies. Take care and big healing hugs. Sharon

      Comment

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