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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Gam Nguyen Profile

    What is axillary adenopathy?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Gam,
      As far as I can find, it means basically enlarged lymph nodes.

      Sharon

      Comment
    • Roz Potenza Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I found this online:

      Axillary adenopathy is swelling and disease in the axillary lymph nodes located along the arms, wall of the chest, and breasts. This can be a sign of a serious medical issue, especially when combined with other symptoms like enlargement in neighboring lymph nodes, fever, or...

      more

      I found this online:

      Axillary adenopathy is swelling and disease in the axillary lymph nodes located along the arms, wall of the chest, and breasts. This can be a sign of a serious medical issue, especially when combined with other symptoms like enlargement in neighboring lymph nodes, fever, or fatigue. A doctor can evaluate a patient with axillary adenopathy to determine the cause and develop a treatment plan to address the issue. Treatment options can vary considerably, from a course of antibiotics to chemotherapy for cancer.

      Comment
  • Kebre Woldegiorgis Profile

    It has been two-months and a quarter since I had lumpectomy three weeks since I finished my rad.treatment. I have a 4 x 3cm lump under my armpit. I just completed 10 days antibiotic. Nothing seems to work. Can somebody who have same issue advise me

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 3 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      I had a lump as well. It came from a build up of fluid from lump node removal. My oncologist removed some fluid @ Dr visit & rest went away on its own. I massages the area in shower with hot water & it helped.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I would be calling my doctor's office and getting an appointment to be seen.

      Comment
  • Mary Cordle Profile

    I have stage one of breast cancer in both breasts. My surgery was DEC 31. why am I just now getting radiation started Mar 2. My dr first told me I needed 3 weeks of radation but my other one says 6. Why??

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 2 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My radiation started 2 months after surgery & I had 6 weeks of treatment. Your incisions have to heal before radiation can begin

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Your body does need time to heal from one procedure to the next. As to the 3 vs 6 weeks you should be sitting down and talking with both doctors and see why the difference and if need be seek a 3rd opinion.

      Comment
  • Valerie Rotella Profile

    My grandmother and sister had breast cancer. What kind of cancer is hereditary?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 1 answer
    • Janelle Strunk Profile
      anonymous
      Family Member or Loved One

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one...

      more

      Before you decide that cancer runs in your family, first gather some information. For each case of cancer, look at:

      Who is affected? How are we related?
      What type of cancer is it? Is it rare?
      How old was this relative when they were diagnosed?
      Did this person get more than one type of cancer?
      Did they smoke?

      Cancer in a close relative, like a parent or sibling (brother or sister), is more cause for concern than cancer in a more distant relative. Even if the cancer was from a gene mutation, the chance of it passing on to you gets lower with more distant relatives.

      Breast cancer is a cancer that can be hereditary. A family history of breast cancer does put you at increased risk for breast cancer. A woman who has a first-degree relative (such as a mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer is about twice as likely to develop breast cancer as a woman without a family history of this cancer. Still, most cases of breast cancer, even those in close relatives, are not part of a family cancer syndrome caused by an inherited gene mutation.

      The chance that someone has an inherited form of breast cancer is higher the younger they are when they get the cancer and the more relatives they have with the disease. Inherited breast cancer can be caused by several different genes, but the most common are BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inherited mutations in these genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Along with breast and ovarian cancer, this syndrome can also lead to male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, as well as some others. This syndrome is more common in women of Ashkenazi descent than it is in the general U.S. population.

      This is why it is so important for you to have an early detection plan. You can creaste a plan at www.earlydetectionplan.org. This plan takes into account your risk profile and age. Of course, if you notice any changes in your breasts, you should consult your physician.

      1 comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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