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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Pankaj Shah Profile

    Gendicine is gene treatment available in China which is supposed to correct P53 gene defect.Is breast cancer related to P53 gene defect only or other genes are also involved?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 1 answer
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That sounds like a question for your doctor(s). We aren't doctors just patients or family members having breast cancer.

      Comment
  • Linda Leist Profile

    How long does treatment last?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 5 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on the type and stage of the breast cancer. We are all different as far as treatment and length of time it takes. Mine took 4 months from start to finish but I was placed on 5 years of hormone treatment. Sharon

      Comment
    • Patricia Stoop Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Hmmm - I've been in treatment for a year now and still have a few months to go. Then maybe 5 years of hormones. Stage 3, grade 3b, her 2 've. Stay strong!

      Comment
  • carmen johnson Profile

    If I have a family member that has died from breast cancer, am I at a greater risk of dying from it also?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Rosanna Wieder Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2B Patient

      That is a good question to ask your doctors. You may even want to do some genetic testing to see if it runs in the genes. Everyone's cancer and treatments are different. Fight like a girl and do what the doctors say. Best of luck.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Carmen,
      HECK NO! There are so many scenario's with breast cancer. As for your relative dying, you have no idea what type of breast cancer, stage, grade, hormone receptor's, genetics, etc. It is almost like asking if my relative was killed in a car crash.... there would be many factors that go...

      more

      Carmen,
      HECK NO! There are so many scenario's with breast cancer. As for your relative dying, you have no idea what type of breast cancer, stage, grade, hormone receptor's, genetics, etc. It is almost like asking if my relative was killed in a car crash.... there would be many factors that go into that car crash.... speed, type of car, type of crash... etc.
      You put your thought and energy into staying positive. You are not your relative, each and every woman's breast cancer is different. No negative thoughts.... Live Strong.
      Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • tracy noblin Profile

    I recently had a lumpectomy for a tumor on my left breast. I now have lobular carcinoma in my right breast and am scheduled for a bilateral mastectomy. Once I have this surgery, what is the liklehood that the cancer will come back somewhere else?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 3 answers
    • Leah Fortune Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      They have to do more tests and check your lymph nodes. That will give you and you doctors more information. Hopefully it hasn't gone anywhere. I hate having to be strong and patient but that is what happens now. You have a lot of women doing the same as you waiting praying being strong and...

      more

      They have to do more tests and check your lymph nodes. That will give you and you doctors more information. Hopefully it hasn't gone anywhere. I hate having to be strong and patient but that is what happens now. You have a lot of women doing the same as you waiting praying being strong and fighting. We do all this for you and with you.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Tracy,
      That is the million dollar question. Your oncologist can show you a website called Ajunctive Treatment Online (or something like that). Your doctor writes in the boxes with your type of cancer, stage, grade, positive lymph nodes and your treatment. It gives you an educated guess purely...

      more

      Tracy,
      That is the million dollar question. Your oncologist can show you a website called Ajunctive Treatment Online (or something like that). Your doctor writes in the boxes with your type of cancer, stage, grade, positive lymph nodes and your treatment. It gives you an educated guess purely on "the numbers". Nobody knows what anybody's chances are of having cancer recur. We all live with that fear forever. The surgery cuts out the primary tumor(s) chemo kills any cells that have escaped the primary tumor or have broken out from lymph nodes, Possibly radiation too, and if you are hormone+ you will receive several years of hormone blocking drugs. You still have a way to go on your complete diagnosis. You really won't know until after your surgery and all the pathology reports are back in. It is a long process but you do finally get through all of it.... just like we all have. Hang in there, darlin. Take care, Sharon

      Comment

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