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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Helene LaPoint Profile

    I have been diagnose with metastatic breast cancer which spread to the liver they put me on faslodex shots can any body give me some answers on this idc hormone receptor postive her2 neg

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. ...

      more

      Helene,
      I had the same type of breast cancer.... IDC with the same hormone receptive ER+ PR+ Her2- Your tumor feeds off of hormones.... which is good because there are hormone blocking drugs you can take. From what I read, Faslodex is one of those type of drugs for metastatic breast cancer. I am just guessing.... but you will probably be on this type of drug and will have scans to see how the liver tumors shrink. If they don't, they will switch you to another type of hormone blocking drug. Many women are on different types of treatments to shrink tumors before they have surgery. What is your doctor saying about your treatment plan? We have a great big family here on this board. We are always sorry to get more members but it is quite a sisterhood of women who have been there, done that. Each woman's treatment is different from another depending on her particular breast cancer cells. Collectively, we try to help support each other. Hang in there, Helene.... You put on those big girl panties and FIGHT LIKE A GIRL!!!
      Take care, Sharon

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    Could breast cancer be contagious?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      After how some of my friends stayed away from me when I was going through treatment, you would think I had the cancer-plague! No, I don't think so or the people who treat it day in and day out would have a higher than normal rates of cancer. Just my own personal thoughts.... My other thought...

      more

      After how some of my friends stayed away from me when I was going through treatment, you would think I had the cancer-plague! No, I don't think so or the people who treat it day in and day out would have a higher than normal rates of cancer. Just my own personal thoughts.... My other thought is that something triggers normal cells to mutate. There are so many different types of cancer, it is a very difficult disease to treat, much less cure.

      6 comments
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Breast Cancer is not contagious. However, it is hereditary. I would highly recommend you have the BRCA test done. I was adopted and had no idea "why" or "how" i could get breast cancer. I was in denial of course. However, i did have the BRCA test done and was positive for BRCA 2. Hereditary...

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      Breast Cancer is not contagious. However, it is hereditary. I would highly recommend you have the BRCA test done. I was adopted and had no idea "why" or "how" i could get breast cancer. I was in denial of course. However, i did have the BRCA test done and was positive for BRCA 2. Hereditary Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer. I will complete my 6th round of chemo on Friday and am scheduled to have bi-lateral mastectomy and later my ovaries removed to ensure my breast cancer will NOT come back.

      Comment
  • Ryan Nez Profile

    What is HR2 cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 3 answers
  • Briawnna Wagoner Profile

    I'm the same 14 year old who asked the other ? I feel what feels like "cords" and a bump that moves around under my nipple....?????

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 2 years 2 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      It's good you are aware and are doing the self exam. I would think what you are feeling is very normal breast tissue, glands & milk ducts. Your breasts can change as you get older and change with your periods as well. It's best to 'get to know' your breasts & figure out what is normal so you'll...

      more

      It's good you are aware and are doing the self exam. I would think what you are feeling is very normal breast tissue, glands & milk ducts. Your breasts can change as you get older and change with your periods as well. It's best to 'get to know' your breasts & figure out what is normal so you'll notice any change. With your period, they can swell & be sore. It's best to do an exam each month after your period has stopped. If you still have concerns talk with an adult & get checked out. Prayers to you.

      1 comment
    • Penny Walton Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 3B Patient

      Brianna, I started self exams at 16 & wondered how anyone could tell if there was a lump as I felt all kinds of stuff. But as Andre said, continue to do it and in a few months you will understand what's normal for you. If your school has a nurse you can go talk to her or your family doctor. A...

      more

      Brianna, I started self exams at 16 & wondered how anyone could tell if there was a lump as I felt all kinds of stuff. But as Andre said, continue to do it and in a few months you will understand what's normal for you. If your school has a nurse you can go talk to her or your family doctor. A doctor can do an exam and help you understand what's normal and assure you things are ok. You can check with the American Cancer Society where you van get information on self exams & even details on health fairs in your area where you can talk one on one with a professional. Just remember, you are not destined to get cancer. Practice good eating habits, exercise and take good care of yourself, these things do make a difference. You're on the right track, do the self exams & reach out again if you need to talk. It's a scary topic, but education and knowing your body will help you now and in the future. Prayers & Blessings, Penny

      Comment

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