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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    What is the best clothing to wear after surgery

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I wore a special loose camisole made from really soft cotton. It had two small pockets to hold the small drain resevoirs. It also had a pocket where some soft padding could be place that gave the appearance of having a breast (I had a mastectomy). My insurance paid for it. I wore it until my...

      more

      I wore a special loose camisole made from really soft cotton. It had two small pockets to hold the small drain resevoirs. It also had a pocket where some soft padding could be place that gave the appearance of having a breast (I had a mastectomy). My insurance paid for it. I wore it until my drains were removed. I have heard of other women where something different but this is just my experience. I didn't have any trouble raising my arms but there are some women that do, so you would want something that fastened in front. Others will will check in here and let you know. Hang in there, darlin'
      take care, Sharon

      2 comments
    • Lisa S Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      Also wear button down tops so you don't have to lift your arms.

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Breast Cancer: I have T1cN0Mx and infiltrating ductal carcinoma grade 2 (richardson's Grading). I have undergone mastectomy. Will I still need further treatment? My ER PR and HER2 reports are awaited

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 2 years 2 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Have you seen an Oncologist&/or Radiation Oncologist yet? They should have done the ER, PR, and Her2 status with the biopsy if you had it done, at least that's when mine was done. My first biopsy showed T1cN0M0 and ER+, PR+, and Her2-. I did a mastectomy, chemo., and rads. even though the...

      more

      Have you seen an Oncologist&/or Radiation Oncologist yet? They should have done the ER, PR, and Her2 status with the biopsy if you had it done, at least that's when mine was done. My first biopsy showed T1cN0M0 and ER+, PR+, and Her2-. I did a mastectomy, chemo., and rads. even though the lymph nodes removed were all negative.

      5 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      We breast cancer patients spend a lot of time --- waiting--- for test results. I also knew my hormone status with the biopsy. We can't really say if you need further treatment...it depends on a lot of factors. Hopefully, you will soon get your test results. Take care, Sharon

      4 comments
  • debbie schubert Profile

    Has anyone else experienced not knowing the origin of their cancer? My doctors don't know where mine is but know that it is stage 4.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 5 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      My boyfriend's best friend had stage 4 cancer. He was a highly respected Oncologist no less. And....his physician never found the origin of his cancer. Best wishes Debbie. Yes, Sharon's right...please come back, there are some wonderful supportive women on here. :)

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Debbie, I will be watching for answers you receive because I haven't heard of this before. Good luck to you. This board has a lot of wonderful supportive women.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Is DCIS a pre cancer condition?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 3 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My oncologist calls it a precancer. However, if DCIS is left untreated, approximately 2/3 of the cases become invasive (cancer). As DCIS is treated with radiation & drug therapy (or possibly mastectomy if there are a number of areas of DCIS) it's immaterial as to whether it is cancer or...

      more

      My oncologist calls it a precancer. However, if DCIS is left untreated, approximately 2/3 of the cases become invasive (cancer). As DCIS is treated with radiation & drug therapy (or possibly mastectomy if there are a number of areas of DCIS) it's immaterial as to whether it is cancer or precancer -- it is taken seriously.

      4 comments
    • joan jones Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 0 Patient

      I have dcis - one area .
      When I met with the surgeon - she said it was " cancer"
      My radiology oncologist - said " pre- cancer " as did my medical oncologist.
      My big word to hold onto is " noninvasive". I was an intermediate grade - estrogen positive and clear margins .
      It was recommended that I...

      more

      I have dcis - one area .
      When I met with the surgeon - she said it was " cancer"
      My radiology oncologist - said " pre- cancer " as did my medical oncologist.
      My big word to hold onto is " noninvasive". I was an intermediate grade - estrogen positive and clear margins .
      It was recommended that I have a lumpectomy , radiation and then tamoxifen.
      There is a lot of controversy as to treatment - over treatment / and method to select patients for treatment . Ask lots of questions - ESP your path report and take your time making decisions ....
      There is a lot on Internet ...so do some research- take your time to make decisions / best wishes !'

      1 comment

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