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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Bettyann Rosenthal Profile

    I have Stage III HER2-pos Breast Cancer. I have Medicare, it pays 80%. Is there not good doctors and treatment for people who don't have secondary ins. or cash growing in the backyard?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 3 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      The American Cancer Society has a lot of great information concerning financial matters, support, and so much more. There are offices in most major cities, or you can reach them on their website which includes a toll-free number. Best wishes to you Bettyann on your journey.

      3 comments
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      If a diagnosis of breast cancer isn't already lousy.... then you have to worry about how you are going to pay for the treatment. We had catastrophic coverage because the insurance premiums were so expensive. My husband and I had to buy our own coverage. The premiums were high and so were the...

      more

      If a diagnosis of breast cancer isn't already lousy.... then you have to worry about how you are going to pay for the treatment. We had catastrophic coverage because the insurance premiums were so expensive. My husband and I had to buy our own coverage. The premiums were high and so were the deductable. Diana is giving you a great suggestion. Contact the American Cancer Society. They gave us a gas card so we could get to my appointments. They also had other programs and suggestions to help you out. If you run into expensive prescriptions you can't afford, I found if you contact the drug manufacturers, they sometimes have programs for low cost drugs or free. That was a huge help when I needed a special drug to combat nausea. Our community also had a benefit dinner and auction for us when I was diagnosed.... what a huge blessing that was!!!

      Comment
  • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile

    How do I tell my kids?

    Asked by anonymous

    Survivor since 1996
    almost 4 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Caroline Foster Caubet Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 1996

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered...

      more

      When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, my daughters were between 16 and 6. What could they hear? Obviously the message could not be the same for each one of them. I spoke to each one individually, without pronouncing the word "cancer". Their questions did come with time and I answered with simple words. What I wanted them to understand was that I was very sick, that I was fighting hard and that there was a pretty good chance that I would win the battle. I tried to give a message of hope. 15 years later, we talk about it and they say they appreciated understanding progressively.

      1 comment
    • Elise Merchant Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me...

      more

      Well ive just turned 12 and my mum was diagnosed on January 05 2011 and i was 11 at the time and she came in and said to me- a soon as she got back from the hospital- Ellie theyve found a lump and so we hugged and then i asked is it cancer and she said it was. i was greatful that she told me straight out that it was and that she was going to be fine :)

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    d dimer test values- does anyone know a website where I can read up on the normal to abnormal values for the d-dimer test. Thank you

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    over 1 year 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This has to do with blood clots, not breast cancer specifically. Are you having problems with tamoxifen and clotting? Here is an article. You can "Google" your question too. Take care, Sharon

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21847593

      2 comments
  • Susan Fox Profile

    What are the permanent effects of chemotherapy? Friends and I have experienced lasting changes in body systems and functions.

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 4 years 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2008

      Wow! I just feel like there are so many.
      1. Joint pain and stiffness
      2. Loss of libido
      3. 50 point increase in cholesterol
      4. Severe pain with intercourse.
      5. Sweats - not night sweats. I get hot and sweat more easily now.

      5 comments
    • Mariah Mariah Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2008

      Thanks for sharing. I thought my doctor was just brushing me off when she told me it might be due to the chemo.

      2 comments

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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