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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Kim Tappe Profile
  • Thumb avatar default

    My first treatment was Wednesday and so far so good. (no sickness or anything) Thank you god. I'm praying the next treatments go good too. Any advice?

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2A Patient
    over 5 years 7 answers
    • View all 7 answers
    • Erin Timlin Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy...

      more

      The steroids and anti-nausea meds work wonders for the first 48 hours or so after treatment. That's the time when the most uncomfortable side effects might occur. Once those are out of your system (by now, maybe, you may start to feel icky, like you're hungover, for example. I just felt heavy and tired and queasy but not enough to make me sick or keep me from doing what I usually do. Hope you're still feeling well!

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope...

      more

      I am hoping and praying your treatments continue like the first one. I also had no sickness except feeling a bit like I had the flu.... felt tired for a couple of days. I thank God, it all went quite tolerable. I did have a reaction to an additive but not to the chemotherapy itself. I hope you will share the positive stories of chemotherapy with anyone who is having that type of treatment. You just don't know how anyone is going to react to that stuff. Continued good luck to you. God's blessings..... Sharon

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    About 7 months ago i went to an urgent care because of what i thought might be IBC. It had the signs of like stage 3. She gave me antibiotics and it went away and she just told me it was a cyst and i still don't believe her. I still dont believe her & im

    Asked by anonymous

    almost 3 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I wouldn't be waiting, I would get to your doctor, and not urgent care right away. I would demand a biopsy, now. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      You can not diagnose by reading on the Internet. You may have 'signs' of cancer (a lump), but you wouldn't have 'signs' of stages. Could you feel a lump? Is that why the Dr said it was a cyst? Cysts don't just go away with antibiotics. Nor does cancer. So if you say whatever the problem you had...

      more

      You can not diagnose by reading on the Internet. You may have 'signs' of cancer (a lump), but you wouldn't have 'signs' of stages. Could you feel a lump? Is that why the Dr said it was a cyst? Cysts don't just go away with antibiotics. Nor does cancer. So if you say whatever the problem you had 7 months ago is gone, you don't have anything to worry about. Once you have your insurance, it sure wouldn't hurt to get a full check up along with a mammogram. If there is suspicion, you would then have a biopsy. That is the only way you would know if something is cancer or not. Any time there are changes in your breast, have it checked out. Prayers to you.

      Comment
  • Airyel Brayerton Profile

    What is the possibility that you would die with breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 6 years 2 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      That is the question that everyone wants to know. Unfortunately, at this time, there is no definitive answer. Yes, some do loose their battle to breast cancer. But with new advancements everyday, more and more women are overcoming their cancer. This is not a one-size-fits-all disease, so each...

      more

      That is the question that everyone wants to know. Unfortunately, at this time, there is no definitive answer. Yes, some do loose their battle to breast cancer. But with new advancements everyday, more and more women are overcoming their cancer. This is not a one-size-fits-all disease, so each diagnosis, each treatment, is different. But with hope and support we can beat this! And all of us are proud to say "I am a survivor!"

      1 comment
    • Tracy Pie Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Breast cancer has a 90% survival rate. Yes, some people do not survive, but with the advances in medicine today, more and more people are surviving. Detecting it early is the key as with all cancers. Doing regular breast exams and getting an annual mammogram are just some of the ways to protect...

      more

      Breast cancer has a 90% survival rate. Yes, some people do not survive, but with the advances in medicine today, more and more people are surviving. Detecting it early is the key as with all cancers. Doing regular breast exams and getting an annual mammogram are just some of the ways to protect yourself.

      Comment

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Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in their lifetime.

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