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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Thumb avatar default

    Does Taxol work for HER2 negative, ER positive cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • julie s Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      I did TAC and had a complete response! (Tumor entirely gone- NED- no evidence if disease!) Keep a positive attitude and stay optimistic...I'm convinced this played a big part in my results!

      Comment
    • Karen G Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 2A Patient

      Yes I was told it does. I am on the AC portion of the AC-T and I am Er HER2 -.

      Comment
  • Andrea Kay Profile

    How does someone become a recipient of a free mammogram?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 6 years 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Andrea,

      I was able to "google" and find the health department in a woman's small town for a free mammogram. Since this is Breast Cancer Awareness Month it should be relatively easy to find an organization that will fund the payment for a mammogram. You can check with the American Cancer...

      more

      Andrea,

      I was able to "google" and find the health department in a woman's small town for a free mammogram. Since this is Breast Cancer Awareness Month it should be relatively easy to find an organization that will fund the payment for a mammogram. You can check with the American Cancer Society, a Public Health Department in your city or county, Planned Parenthood, Susan G. Komen Org. I just googled FREE MAMMOGRAMS... this is what I came up with... there were many.
      Take care, Sharon
      http://voices.yahoo.com/where-free-mammogram-5009612.html?cat=5

      Comment
    • Traciann brundage Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      My mom called her local hospital and told them what was going on with me and she had no insurance . She filled out a few forms and it was only 20 dollars for her .

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I recently found a lump so I bought health insurance. Am worried that since I have to wait 3mo before its active, the lump & risks will grow. If I get tested before insurance kicks in, it won't pay for treatment. (if cancerous) Any thoughts?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    almost 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Diana Foster Payne Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      I agree with Lysa

      Comment
    • Natalie Grant Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Go get check... Early detection is key to beating this!!! Forget about how you going to pay. If you don't have insurance there are a lot of resources out there like the cancer society that will help you out. MAKE APPOINTMENT ASAP!!!!

      Comment
  • Carol Braunstein Profile

    At what level of output can a drain be removed following axillary lymph node removal for breast cancer?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 4 years 6 answers
    • View all 6 answers
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      That's a decision for your surgeon. Mine could have been removed 5 days post op but she elected to keep them in an additional 5 days to be safe. She said she didn't want to have to put them back in if needed. She did remove 45cc of fluid in another 9 days but said that was very minimal for...

      more

      That's a decision for your surgeon. Mine could have been removed 5 days post op but she elected to keep them in an additional 5 days to be safe. She said she didn't want to have to put them back in if needed. She did remove 45cc of fluid in another 9 days but said that was very minimal for that time frame. A few weeks later the OT thought I had built up some more and 22cc were removed that time but none since.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Mine were also removed 6 days after surgery mastectomy w/immediate reconstruction last Tuesday. 20cc they were removed. You will b a little swollen after drains removed. I was so happy to take a real.shower

      2 comments

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