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Introduction

 
Introduction

Chapter: 1 - Introduction

Subchapter: 1 - Introduction

Each of our lives is a story. We journey along a road of experiences and emotions, passing significant milestones along the way. When suddenly, the road beneath our feet takes a sharp turn, breaking from what was once certain.

Breast cancer causes this break. Perspective ruthlessly shifts; you and your loved ones see the road differently than before.

However, we see the road has not ended–it continues on through new hills and new valleys. We know that life has done this before, curiously forcing us into foreign places and down roads that seemed impassable. Yet somehow these challenges become fertile soil where seeds of strength, love, and resilience mature and grow strong.

Remember, this is a road that has been traversed by thousands of women, women with full lives and loved ones. Women whose dreams–whose lives–were threatened by breast cancer. Women who now share stories of endurance and hope.

Beyond the Shock® is first and foremost a resource for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Secondly, it is for their loved ones to gain a better understanding of the disease and to feel a stronger sense of connection. Finally, it is for doctors to reinforce their instruction and advice.

This is the first of a series of videos, divided up into chapters and sub-chapters. These videos will provide information for you to process, share and use to your own benefit. You will learn about breast cancer: it’s types and stages, how it grows, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated. More than anything else, Beyond the Shock® is a place to gain knowledge for today and receive hope for tomorrow.

Related Questions

  • Alexandra Gomez Profile

    What age can girls get breast cancer ?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    about 7 years 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Alice Eisele Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones,...

      more

      • A Women's breast development takes 3 to 4 years and is usually complete by age 14. Once fully formed, breast cells are very immature and highly active until a woman's first full-term pregnancy. While they are immature, a women's breast cells are very responsive to estrogen and other hormones, including hormone disrupters in the environment.

      • As with many other diseases, your risk of breast cancer goes up as you get older. For example, according to the American Cancer Society, about 1 out of 8 invasive breast cancers develop in women younger than 45. About 2 out of 3 invasive breast cancers are found in women 55 or older. In fact, the aging process is the biggest risk factor for breast cancer. That's because the longer we live, there are more opportunities for genetic damage (mutations) in the body. And as we age, our bodies are less capable of repairing genetic damage.

      • About 1 in 8 women in the United States (12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

      • A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. About 20-30% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a family history of breast cancer.

      These steps will help lower your risk:
      • maintaining a healthy weight
      • exercising regularly
      • limiting alcohol
      • eating nutritious food
      • never smoking (or quitting if you do smoke)

      Comment
    • Jessica Worcester Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I'm 20

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    d dimer test values- does anyone know a website where I can read up on the normal to abnormal values for the d-dimer test. Thank you

    Asked by anonymous

    Stage 2B Patient
    almost 5 years 1 answer
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      This has to do with blood clots, not breast cancer specifically. Are you having problems with tamoxifen and clotting? Here is an article. You can "Google" your question too. Take care, Sharon

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21847593

      2 comments
  • Thumb avatar default

    I also had a bone scan of my hips and the raduim what ever they put into my vein also showed bright white and glowing on my hip where I have been having pain...does that mean the cancer has spread to my bones?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    over 5 years 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Tamara Davidson Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 4 Patient

      No matter what keep ur faith,,, with faith it's all possible. I remember ur feeling,the day after my bone scan I met a waiter at chilies that told me he was in remission for stage4 bone cancer so anyway don't fret take whatever cards u givin and fight and make ur case to god ,,, gob less ya:)

      Comment
    • Evelyn Heilbrunn Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2012

      The bright spots are usually areas of bone re-growth. There are several reasons why your bones might be doing this, including a recently fractured bone. In my last bone scan, I lit up like a Christmas tree. I have fallen quite a bit in recent years, and every single spot was where I'd broken a...

      more

      The bright spots are usually areas of bone re-growth. There are several reasons why your bones might be doing this, including a recently fractured bone. In my last bone scan, I lit up like a Christmas tree. I have fallen quite a bit in recent years, and every single spot was where I'd broken a bone! There may also be bone re-growth where cancer is in the bone and is causing some degeneration.
      Please don't get ahead of yourself -- wait to discuss the results with your doctor. Best of luck to you.

      2 comments
  • Mary Anne Babicky-Bouton Profile

    Has anyone found a lump in other breast while going through final radiation treatments? Have 5 more to go and found something/lump in right breast. Had lumpectomy on left side in Jan.

    Asked by anonymous

    stage_4 Patient
    about 5 years 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No, I have not. I had a bilateral mastectomy. But you know your body best. If there are changes - or you feel something, get it checked. Better to be safe than sorry. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2011

      Check with your medical onc or radiation onc. From what I understand it's unlikely that you'll get cancer in the opposite breast. But check for peace of mind!

      Comment

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