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    i had a call back and ultrasound which appeared to be normal but have to go back in 6months why

    Asked by anonymous

    about 18 hours 4 answers
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    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      As Betti said, better to be safe than sorry. Try not to worry. Sounds like you are in good hands. Pray re to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      Sometimes they see something that is most likely benign but they want to check it again in 6 months to make sure it stays stable. I used to do mammograms and at times U/S and that's what it meant then so probably does now. If you have any questions I'd talk with your doctor and see what they say.

      2 comments
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    Yesterday Wednesday, September 2, 2015 my 59 yr. old Mother was diagnosed with Breast Cancer. We have yet to find out what stage she is in but I am certain I am not ready to lose her even at 29 yrs old. I have cried until my eyes are blood shot red.

    Asked by anonymous

    about 20 hours 7 answers
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    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      Like the others said, no one is going anywhere. Yes hearing those words "you have cancer" is horrible, but it is NOT a death sentence. We are all living proof of that! Educate yourself. There are great videos here to learn from, and stay positive. It's going to be a whirlwind of appoints, be...

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      Like the others said, no one is going anywhere. Yes hearing those words "you have cancer" is horrible, but it is NOT a death sentence. We are all living proof of that! Educate yourself. There are great videos here to learn from, and stay positive. It's going to be a whirlwind of appoints, be supportive. She will need some help, so just be there for her. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Hold your horses! I was 59 when diagnosed and the first thing I thought of was this is it.... I am a goner. A breast cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence! I am still here, 8 years later and healthy. I went through treatment and have gone on with my life. You are going to be your Mom's...

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      Hold your horses! I was 59 when diagnosed and the first thing I thought of was this is it.... I am a goner. A breast cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence! I am still here, 8 years later and healthy. I went through treatment and have gone on with my life. You are going to be your Mom's best support. Don't think in a negative way. My cancer was an invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common form. I was diagnose as a 2B and it was an a rather aggressive type of cells. It was also in a lymph node. I chose to have a mastectomy, but I could have chosen a lumpectomy except I would have had to come back and do 6 weeks of daily radiation. With mastectomy, and 4 rounds of chemo, that was it. I also chose not to do a reconstruction..... as it can be a long drawn out process. I chose to wear a prosthetic which works perfect for me. Your Mom will have lots of choices to make and I would advise you to attend to consultations with her and take notes. No doubt, this diagnosis has rocked her world..... and yours. Hang in there, you will be having several appointments before she gets her treatment plan. Every woman's diagnosis is different and so is her treatments. Keep in touch, and just be thankful it was found. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Chemo causes my mouth to feel coated in buttery, yucky Crisco. Anyone else have this & have suggestions?

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 5 answers
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    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I used plastic utensils that helped with my tastes during chemo. You may want to let your team know also as they might have something you can use to help with it. I always had what I called a "furry tongue" as that's how it felt at times.

      Comment
    • Sara G Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      (I didn't intend for my post above to be anonymous, apologies for my Beyond The Shock newbie mistake!)

      1 comment
  • Cha ro Profile

    Anybody had the doc to stop your radiation treatment & go back to doing chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    3 days 3 answers
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      No, sorry, I didn't have radiation, but I'm sure someone will chime in soon. Prayers to you.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      My place took a picture each week of my rads. but didn't do any lab work.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    which is more accurate test MRI or Mammogram?

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 4 answers
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    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      It depends on what type of breast cancer. Unlike Marianne, I had a lump which the MRI clearly showed..... better than the mammogram. If I would have been able to have an MRI at my last mammogram before my actual diagnosis, it would have caught my cancer at a much earlier stage. The breast...

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      It depends on what type of breast cancer. Unlike Marianne, I had a lump which the MRI clearly showed..... better than the mammogram. If I would have been able to have an MRI at my last mammogram before my actual diagnosis, it would have caught my cancer at a much earlier stage. The breast center refused to allow me an MRI because I didn't fit their criteria. Instead they took 15 mammograms! Lesson learned.... be your own best advocate. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • André Roberts Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      It really depends on the individual. I found my lump. It showed on a mammogram. An ultrasound pretty much confirmed it. I then had a biopsy. If your questioning something, get a second opinion. Prayers to you.

      Comment
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    im 26 years old i had my MRI last 2013 it found some benign & malignant lump in my left & right breast. The doctor advise me to undergone mammogram & they found nothing.. But im still experiencing pain in my breast. What shall i do? &

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 4 answers
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    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      I agree, I'd be looking for a new doctor.

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      RUN, don't walk to another doctor for a second opinion. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    How do you stay positive as your family member undergoes chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    4 days 5 answers
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    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I so agree.... many times, I had to be much stronger for my friends and relatives. I had to put on a brave face for them. In my "acting" I did actually make myself feel a lot better mentally and physically. I got so it was no longer an act but I did become my own power-house of positive...

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      I so agree.... many times, I had to be much stronger for my friends and relatives. I had to put on a brave face for them. In my "acting" I did actually make myself feel a lot better mentally and physically. I got so it was no longer an act but I did become my own power-house of positive energy. I looked forward to my chemo treatments and appointments because I knew it was one closer to being completed with treatment. I used to wear silly hats to my oncologists office because his office truly had a uplifting feeling. Always something tasty to eat, other patients laughing like we were all in this boat together. I never felt the treatments or appointments were doom and gloom. I think one has to be their own best advocate and set the mood when dealing with others. Lots of people were afraid of me and some of my best friends dropped me. I understood their fear and once I was through treatment, they drifted back. I actually made a whole new set of pals going through treatment. I had people say some very weird things to me.... like "How long do you have to live?" "My aunt died a horrible death from breast cancer back in the 50's." Some woman sent me a series of talks give by a professor who was dying of cancer..... At times, I just wanted to talk to people. I actually did a blog for the horse community I belong to. I wanted other women to know having breast cancer was not a death sentence. Going through treatment.... I had chemo and a mastectomy.... wasn't the end of the world. I wanted them not to be afraid of having regular mammograms. Early treatment is always the best. You can always ask what your relative needs.... a view meals the first couple of day after chemo is really appreciated. Their taste will change and is sometimes a bit eclectic. I wouldn't fix anything spicy, but just ask. You are kind for being sensitive. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Betti, Trisha, and Sharon have it nicely covered. I craved normal conversation. A conversation that was not about about cancer is what I craved. An evening of Wine and chick flicks was a wonderful diversion.

      Comment
  • Cha ro Profile

    The dr has stopped my moms radiation & put her back on chemo. Any of u have experience with the Adriamycin chemo?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    4 days 2 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh yes, very common. It's called "Red Devil" and can be very tough on certain people. I really didn't have that much trouble. It made me ache like I had the flu. After about 4 days, I started feeling a lot better. I was never nauseated and was given a drug called Emend so I wouldn't be...

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      Oh yes, very common. It's called "Red Devil" and can be very tough on certain people. I really didn't have that much trouble. It made me ache like I had the flu. After about 4 days, I started feeling a lot better. I was never nauseated and was given a drug called Emend so I wouldn't be nauseated. My taste changed and some food did not taste good to me. SOmetimes your sense of smell is also effected.... things don't smell good. It can be tough on immune system but they give you an injection of Neulasta to counteract it. Be sure Mom stays hydrated. They will give her a handout with all the common side effects. Take care, Sharon

      1 comment
    • Sara G Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Hi. I completed Cycle 3 of 4 six days ago of Adriamycin & Cytoxan in "dose dense" treatments (aka every 2 weeks instead of 3), and can tell you what I'm experiencing. While the internet is an amazing tool, be wary because as all of us will acknowledge - side effects vary greatly from person to...

      more

      Hi. I completed Cycle 3 of 4 six days ago of Adriamycin & Cytoxan in "dose dense" treatments (aka every 2 weeks instead of 3), and can tell you what I'm experiencing. While the internet is an amazing tool, be wary because as all of us will acknowledge - side effects vary greatly from person to person! Not just biologically, but I believe emotionally.

      Before my chemo, I learned of the "red devil" term as well, and the infusion nurses will want to refer to it as something more adorable like "KoolAid" but the truth is - it's red and potent and for me it is literally shrinking my tumor in real time. The color doesn't bother me at all, and since your Mom has done chemo before, I imagine she just wants to be given something that works for her body.

      Side effect wise, I tend to experience: (1) fatigue, which is intermittent and a bit unpredictable - and sometimes my muscles feel like jelly so I just have to take it slow. (2) my mouth for the first week or so feels like it's coated in butter or Crisco, something I'm not finding others experience, so I plan to Ask about it here shortly. (3) the first 2 cycles I went hoarse and lost my voice for a couple of days. (4) hair loss. (5) taste changes - which requires creative hunting for what is now tasty or at least edible to you.

      Similar to what Sharon noted about Neulasta, on the 3rd->9th day after chemo I inject Neupogen into my belly fat at home, which also boosts white blood cells production in your bone marrow and help counteract your low counts. Since the injection is daily, it's a lesser dose so I thankfully don't feel the achy pains others have endured.

      I feel blessed to have manageable side effects and wish the same to your Mom and all those undergoing chemo. When the side effects weaken as the next Cycle approaches, I find it renews my strength and reminds me that my body is fighting back.

      Adriamycin is used often for breast cancer treatment and I wish your Mom and you the very best. xoxo

      1 comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    I feel numb. Received a phone call the radiologist found a "cluster of calcification". I'm scheduled for more testing this week. Cluster sounds so scary. I'm not sure how I feel about this.

    Asked by anonymous

    4 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Oh my goodness.... do not panic! I have had many, many, friends who have had the same thing. They will do a biopsy, and see the kind of cells are within this cluster. So often, these turn out totally fine. If there are some cancer cells within, there are many, many, ways to treat this. This...

      more

      Oh my goodness.... do not panic! I have had many, many, friends who have had the same thing. They will do a biopsy, and see the kind of cells are within this cluster. So often, these turn out totally fine. If there are some cancer cells within, there are many, many, ways to treat this. This happens very often.... please take a big deep breath, no matter what, you WILL be OK!!! Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      There are several types of calcifications some being benign and others cancerous. That's the reason they've ordered more tests to determine their nature and if need be a biopsy of them.

      Comment
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