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  • Thumb avatar default

    whats the difference in the risk of developing cancer between DCIS " ductal " and LCIS " lobular "?

    Asked by anonymous

    about 12 hours 1 answer
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      DCIS is considered and treated as early noninvasive breast cancer which may become invasive. Mastectomy or lumpectomy & radiation are needed, and may be followed with anti hormone therapy. LCIS is not considered cancer, but is a factor that increases risk for developing it. Anti hormone therapy...

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      DCIS is considered and treated as early noninvasive breast cancer which may become invasive. Mastectomy or lumpectomy & radiation are needed, and may be followed with anti hormone therapy. LCIS is not considered cancer, but is a factor that increases risk for developing it. Anti hormone therapy and careful screening might be recommended. But, if there is a strong family history of cancer, or BRAC 1 or 2, preventative mastectomies of both breasts might be considered because of increased risk. Every case is individual, and includes factors such as family history. In general, DCIS is treated as early stage breast cancer , and LCIS is usually considered a factor which may increase the risk of developing bc.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can a patient survive if breast cancer has spread to the lymph nodes?

    Asked by anonymous

    about 18 hours 5 answers
    • View all 5 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Absolutely! I am one of many who is alive and well after being diagnosed with breast cancer that had spread to lymph nodes. Seven years.... Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      I feel the need to add a PS....I thought when I was diagnosed with breast cancer seven years ago, I was dead. What I learned going forward is just how survivable breast cancer is. The treatment can be rather gruelling but that being said, most women go on to live full lives. Some women do...

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      I feel the need to add a PS....I thought when I was diagnosed with breast cancer seven years ago, I was dead. What I learned going forward is just how survivable breast cancer is. The treatment can be rather gruelling but that being said, most women go on to live full lives. Some women do have recurrences and a very few number do die from their disease. We have entered a world of available treatment that rids our bodies of cancer. There are many women being diagnosed with Breast Cancer, but the treatment is so targeted to a cell level, there are a whole bunch more survivors than those who die. Hang in there, do not despair. Treatment is tough, but you will find, you are MORE tough. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
  • Marianne Robertson Profile

    Happy Thanksgiving have a great day

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    1 day 3 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      Thanks, Marianne, and happy Thanksgiving to all in this supportive, caring group. Lou.

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      The same to you even though I didn't see this message until the day after. I hope it was a good one.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Can you get a biopsy of a breast lump quickly

    Asked by anonymous

    1 day 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      We wish..... You might be able to get the biopsy done quickly. It is the lab that takes the time. I have always thought THE WAIT is the torture, in the purest sense. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I changed facilities because I was going to have to wait to have a biopsy. Instead, I had a biopsy the following week, and results within three days. The breast surgeon had asked if I wanted to hear the results over the phone, or wait to come in. I wanted the results ASAP.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Have just been diagnosed invasive and in situ ductal carcinoma Have met with general surgeon and plastic surgeon for mastectomy on dec 5 2014 Have not met with oncologist when will that happen

    Asked by anonymous

    1 day 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Norma  Cook Profile
      anonymous
      Stage 1 Patient

      You may not see an oncologist until after your surgery when the pathology report gives more precise details about your cancer. If I understand this correctly, based on my own experience, the surgeons deal with the removal of the tumor(s) to the best of their ability; then the oncologist follows...

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      You may not see an oncologist until after your surgery when the pathology report gives more precise details about your cancer. If I understand this correctly, based on my own experience, the surgeons deal with the removal of the tumor(s) to the best of their ability; then the oncologist follows up with recommendations to completely eradicate any stray cancer cells and/or keep new ones from developing. The surgeons may see you for follow-up visits in relation to your initial healing, but the oncologist will keep an eye on you for a longer period to oversee your ongoing recovery and restore you to good health. You will find that each person's situation is unique, so their exact treatment is unique, as well.

      1 comment
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I believe that I met with my oncologist after surgery. We discussed the chemo treatment that I would have, but when I had a low oncotype score, I did not have chemo. I had hormone positive cancer, so I take Femara. I have been following up with testing and seeing the oncologist every six...

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      I believe that I met with my oncologist after surgery. We discussed the chemo treatment that I would have, but when I had a low oncotype score, I did not have chemo. I had hormone positive cancer, so I take Femara. I have been following up with testing and seeing the oncologist every six months. But, every case is individualized for each person, depending on your own situation.

      1 comment
  • Tara Medeiros  Profile

    Mastectomy is Monday ....any advice

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    2 days 2 answers
    • Marianne Robertson Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Remind your self you are saving your life. Your breasts do not define you. Breathe and relax which is harder said than done. The cancer is gone out of your body. It isn't easy and the Jp drains suck but think about what you are living for and that will make it easier. God bless your journey

      Comment
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Make some meals ahead so you have food to eat while you heal. Move some plates, cups, bowls etc to the counter. It will be hard to lift your arms for a few days. Invest in a comfy button up shirt or two. The pain is not terrible - you will just need a lot of rest and your range of motion can be...

      more

      Make some meals ahead so you have food to eat while you heal. Move some plates, cups, bowls etc to the counter. It will be hard to lift your arms for a few days. Invest in a comfy button up shirt or two. The pain is not terrible - you will just need a lot of rest and your range of motion can be limited. Tee up some shows to binge on or get some books and mags.

      Comment
  • Rachelle Turney Profile

    I had my reconstruction surgery and they had to make an incision under my arm pretty far back. It itches like crazy!!! Happen to anyone else?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    2 days 2 answers
    • Thumb avatar default
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      The itching was the worst part of the recovery for me after both my mastectomy and exchange! (Besides the drains that it) it Drove me NuTs!! Cortisone 10 helped as did an RX called hydroxyl that I took at night.

      Comment
    • Rachelle Turney Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Did anyone nation to you why there's so much itching?

      Comment
  • Mabel Dominguez Profile

    How you do deal with the chills?

    Asked by anonymous

    Learning About Breast Cancer
    2 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Lou Cam Profile
      anonymous
      Patient

      I agree with Betti, I would ask someone in the doctors office. Are you recovering from surgery? Or having chemo treatment? Maybe try a heating pad?

      Comment
    • sharon s Profile
      anonymous
      Learning About Breast Cancer

      Buy some wool socks

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    My mum has infiltrating duct carcinoma (nos) on left breast, grade 11, perineural invason not seen, vascular invasion not seen, nearest and circumferential resected margins are free . Can u please suggest what should be done

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 4 answers
    • View all 4 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      She needs to have this explained as it pertains to her. That way, any questions that come up can be answered regarding her particular case. Go with her to her appointment and take note for her. She won't be able to take in all that will be told to her. This is a very stressful time and she...

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      She needs to have this explained as it pertains to her. That way, any questions that come up can be answered regarding her particular case. Go with her to her appointment and take note for her. She won't be able to take in all that will be told to her. This is a very stressful time and she will need a lot of support. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Betti A Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2013

      What has her doctor(s) told her? Someone with the same type and factors of your mum will be different than hers. Cancer treatment(s) are individualized.

      Comment
  • Thumb avatar default

    Hi, I had a mammogram and ultrasound done this month. The radiologist just called and said I need to have a mass biopsied! I had this mass biopsied 6 years ago and it was a fibroadenoma. Why would they want to boipsy it again? Can it become cancerous

    Asked by anonymous

    3 days 3 answers
    • Sharon Danielson Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2007

      Somehow this has changed or maybe something else has formed near the other one. Be sure the doctor knows your history. Don't put this off. Take care, Sharon

      Comment
    • Sharon Doria Profile
      anonymous
      Survivor since 2009

      Hi, Fibroadenoma's need to be monitored. They are generally not dangerous but it is a condition that requires monitoring in case of growth or change in shape. Has it been 6 years since your last mammogram and sonnegram? Does the radiologist know you have a fibroadenoma? It's not that it can...

      more

      Hi, Fibroadenoma's need to be monitored. They are generally not dangerous but it is a condition that requires monitoring in case of growth or change in shape. Has it been 6 years since your last mammogram and sonnegram? Does the radiologist know you have a fibroadenoma? It's not that it can turn into BC, however, women with fibroadenoma's have a 1 1/2 to 2 times greater chance of developing BC than women with no breast changes. Please follow the advice of your doctors. They are looking out for your best interests.

      Best, Sharon D

      1 comment